Location: Eatonton Georgia

Bird-Shaped Stone Tumult in Putnam County, Georgia

The existence of curious effigy-mounds in the southern counties of Wisconsin was noted by Mr. Lapham in 1836. Subsequently, Mr. Taylor, Professor Locke, and Messrs. Squier and Davis furnished additional information in regard to the distinctive characteristics of these unusual structures. It was reserved, however, for the Smithsonian Institution, in the seventh volume of its “Contributions,” to furnish, from the pen of Mr. Lapham, the most complete account of these interesting remains. They were quite numerous along the great Indian trail or war-path from Lake Michigan, near Milwaukee, to the Mississippi above the Prairie du Chien. Generally representing men,...

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Slave Narrative of Rachel Adams

Interviewer: Sadie S. Hornsby Person Interviewed: Rachel Adams Location: 300 Odd Street, Athens, Georgia Age: 78 Rachel Adams’ two-room, frame house is perched on the side of a steep hill where peach trees and bamboo form dense shade. Stalks of corn at the rear of the dwelling reach almost to the roof ridge and a portion of the front yard is enclosed for a chicken yard. Stepping gingerly around the amazing number of nondescript articles scattered about the small veranda, the visitor rapped several times on the front door, but received no response. A neighbor said the old woman might be found at her son’s store, but she was finally located at the home of a daughter. Rachel came to the front door with a sandwich of hoecake and cheese in one hand and a glass of water in the other. “Dis here’s Rachel Adams,” she declared. “Have a seat on de porch.” Rachel is tall, thin, very black, and wears glasses. Her faded pink outing wrapper was partly covered by an apron made of a heavy meal sack. Tennis shoes, worn without hose, and a man’s black hat completed her outfit. Rachel began her story by saying: “Miss, dats been sich a long time back dat I has most forgot how things went. Anyhow I was borned in Putman County ’bout two miles from Eatonton, Georgia. My Ma...

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Biography of Hon T. A. Sherwood

Thomas Adiel Sherwood was born at Eatonton, in Putnam county, Georgia, June 2, 1834, where he spent his early life. His father, Rev. Adiel Sherwood, D.D., was a Baptist clergyman of great learning and prominence, who was born and reared at Fort Edward, in the State of New York. The family were of English extraction. Dr. Thomas Sherwood, and Andrew, his brother, immigrated to this country during its colonial period, from Nottinghamshire, England, and settled in Connecticut. Dr. Thomas Sherwood was the grandfather of Major Adiel Sherwood, who served in the war of the Revolution under Gen. George Washington, and was present with him at Valley Forge, and in several of the battles of that memorable war. Major Adiel Sherwood was the father of Rev. Doctor Adiel Sherwood, and grandfather of the subject of this sketch. In 1852 Rev. Doctor Sherwood, for several years president of Shurtleff College, and the author of several theological works, removed from Alton, Illinois, whither he had removed from Georgia, and settled at Cape Girardeau, in the State of Missouri, and with him came his son, Thomas Adiel, then a young man about 18 years of age. Young Sherwood had already acquired a good education at Mercer University, Georgia, which he completed at Shurtleff College, Alton, Illinois. After leaving college be studied law, occasionally teaching school, until he graduated at the Cincinnati, Ohio, Law...

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