Location: Dunbarton New Hampshire

Biographical Sketch of David Sargent

David Sargent, a well-known farmer and cattle dealer of Dunbarton, Merrimack County, N.H., was born in this town in 1833, son of Eliphalet R. and Lydia (Wells) Sargent. His paternal grandfather, Thomas, was a native of Goffstown, N.H., in which place, also, he died. He was a farmer by occupation. Eliphalet R. Sargent was born in Goffstown, Hillsborough County, N.H. He acquired a common-school education in his native town, after which he engaged in farming during the rest of his active life. In politics he was a Republican; and he served as Selectman and as Representative to the legislature two years, besides filling other Lydia Wells Sargent, reared nine children. Mr. Sargent died at the age of eighty-two years. David Sargent, who was the next to the youngest of his parents’ four sons, was educated in the schools of Dunbarton and Derry, N.H. He then went to work on the farm, where he still remains. His enterprising spirit has led him to engage in the manufacture of lumber, and he has also dealt extensively in cattle. Some time ago he made a tour through the West, visiting Salt Lake City and many other important places, including some in California. Mr. Sargent married Mary Ann, daughter of John and Mehitable (Smith) Woodburn, of Londonderry, N.H.; and they have reared five children, namely: Fred D. Sargent, born February 5, 1858; Mary...

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Biography of Charles F. M. Stark

Charles F. M. Stark, a wellknown resident of Dunbarton, Merrimack County, was born in this town, February 18, 1848, son of John and Caroline J. (Morris) Stark. He is a great-great-grandson of General John Stark, the famous victor of Bennington. John Stark, the father, was a lawyer, who practised his profession in Galena, Ill., and in New York City. He died in Washington, D.C., at the age of forty-two years. His wife, Caroline, was the youngest daughter of Thomas Morris, and a grand-daughter of Robert Morris, signer of the Declaration of Independence and first Secretary of State of the United States. Charles F. M. Stark was a student at St. Paul’s School in Concord. After leaving school, he resided for a number of years in New York City, and for a time was interested in insurance in New York and Boston. He finally returned to the family homestead in Dunbarton, where he has since resided, it having become his property through inheritance. The house was built by his great-grandfather, Major Caleb Stark, a son of General John Stark, and who did good service to his county in the Revolutionary War. It was built after the model of an English manor house, and is a quaint and interesting piece of architecture. Every room it contains is replete with historic memories. Heirlooms and relics both of the Stark and Morris families...

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Biography of Samuel Smith Page

Samuel Smith Page, who for more than forty years was one of the most esteemed residents of Hopkinton, was born September 30, 1822, in Dunbarton, N.H. He is a descendant of Benjamin Page, who was born in 1640, in Dedbam, fifty-seven miles north-east of London, England. In 1660, on account of religious differences, Benjamin came to America, locating in Haverhill, Mass., where on September 21, 1666, he married Mary Whittier, who belonged to the family from which the poet, John G. Whittier, sprung. Their son, Jeremiah, the eldest of a family of sixteen, born September 14, 1667, was the next ancestor. He married Deborah Hendrick, of Newburyport, Mass., July 2, 1696; and they reared seven children, Caleb and Joshua. He died in 1752. Caleb Page, the next in line of descent, was born August 16, 1705, and died in 1785. He married in 1728 or 1729 Ruth Wallingford, of Boston, who died in 1738. In 1740 he married a widow Carleton, of Newburyport, who weighed three hundred and fifteen pounds. She, together with a huge arm-chair, now in the possession of the Stark family, had to be carried to meeting on an ox sled. In 1749 Caleb Page removed from Haverhill, Mass., to Atkinson, N.H., where he is said to have owned land measuring one mile in opposite directions from the site of the present academy. In 1751 he...

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Biography of Edward Plummer Paige

Edward Plummer Paige, a former legislative Representative of the town of Dunbarton, was born in Bradford, N.H., in 1857, son of Bayard P. and Louisa S. Paige. The father of Edward Plummer, who was born in Dunbarton, subsequently removed to Hopkinton, N.H., where he acquired his education. At the age of fourteen years he returned to Dunbarton, and entered the general merchandise store of his brother Jeremiah as clerk. Three or four years later they moved the business to Bradford, where he continued to work for some time. He next engaged in stove-making, turning out some of the first stoves used in this part of New Hampshire. Later Mr. Paige went to Boston, Mass., where he was associated with the well-known firm, Leach & Gilmore, wholesale dealers in groceries. Messrs. Leach & Gilmore also owned and controlled a line of steamboats running between Boston and Bangor, which was a financially successful undertaking until William K. Vanderbilt put on a steamer in opposition. The cut rates for passengers and freight rendered the enterprise almost profitless, and they were glad to dispose of their interest to Mr. Vanderbilt. Mr. Paige also sold his interest in the grocery, after which he removed to Montreal, Canada, where for thirty years he was successfully engaged in the manufacture of all kinds of farming implements. He then returned to Dunbarton, and remained there during the...

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