Location: Dayton Oregon

Alderman, Charlotte Ruth Odell – Obituary

Mrs. Charlotte Ruth Odell Alderman was born in Carroll County, Indiana, in 1842. Her father crossed the plains in 1851, bringing his wife and nine children. They settled in Webfoot near Dayton, where the family grew to maturity. Charlotte attended school at Lebanon, Lafayette and Willamette University, besides her home school. She taught school in Lincoln County, and in 1866, she married Albert Lockwood Alderman. They lived north of Dayton a number of years and then moved to Dayton so the children could better attend school. To them five children were born: Edwin who died in 1908; Ennis who lives near Dayton; Lewis who is a teacher in the state university; George who died in 1893; and Eva, now Mrs. Ora Powell of Corvallis. Mrs. Alderman was a most devoted wife and loving mother, a consistent Christian and a constituent member of the First Baptist Church of Dayton, Ore. She was strongly allied with the temperance work, being a member of the W. C. T. U. She was always sympathetic with those in need and had an abiding faith in the goodness of people. Her friends and relatives loved her in response to her strong affection on her part. She died at the home of her son Ennis May 30, 1910, being 68 years, 1 month and 14 days old. Rev. A. J. Hunsaker of McMinnville, who was her...

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Biography of Gen. Joel Palmer

GEN. JOEL PALMER. – There have been few men in Oregon more universally respected, or whom the people have more delighted to honor, than General Palmer. A plain, unpretentious man, who assumed absolutely nothing, he was nevertheless conscious of his superior abilities, and had no hesitancy in assuming commensurate responsibilities. For natural capacity and sagacity in great affairs, he ranks with the first men of our state, such as General Lane, Colonel Cornelius, Judge Kelly or Governor Gibbs. He reckoned himself as a New Yorker, both parents having been natives and residents of that state, although at the time of his birth they were on a temporary sojourn in Canada. His boyhood and youth were spent at the old home in the Empire state; and he early assumed the responsibilities of life, marrying, when but nineteen, Miss Catherine Caffey. Of their two children, Miss Sarah subsequently came to Oregon with her father and became the wife of Mr. Andrew Smith; and the other died in infancy, the mother not long surviving. Mr. Palmer was married again to Miss Sarah A. Derbyshire of Bucks county, Pennsylvania. That was in 1836. Soon afterwards he moved to Indiana, and, having become accustomed to the management of large works, took a contract to build portions of the White Water canal, and to complete the locks at Cedar Grove. During his stay in Indiana...

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Biography of John McClellan

John McClellan, one of the earliest pioneers of Boise, Idaho, is a native of Ohio, born in Licking County, March 16, 1827, of Irish and English extraction, his paternal ancestors being Irish, his maternal, English. John McClellan, his father, was born in Ireland in 1777, and in the year 1820 came to America, landing at New York, where he remained for some time and where he was married to Miss Amanda Reed, a native of New York and a daughter of English parents. From New York they removed to Dresden, Ohio, where they resided until 1850 in which year he and his wife and seven children crossed the plains to Oregon, John, the subject of this sketch, at that time being twenty-two years of age. That year many of the overland emigrants died of cholera, and several of the company with which the McClellan family traveled were victims of that dread disease and were buried by the wayside, among them an aunt of our subject. His immediate family, however, made the trip in safety, and stopped first at Milwaukee, on the Willamette River, six miles above Portland. Later they removed to Yam Hill County and settled on a farm, where the father spent the rest of his life and died at the age of eighty-eight years. Of his family of seven who crossed the plains in 1850, only four...

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Biography of Joel B. Harper

History has long since placed on its pages the names of those who, coming to the Atlantic coast, planted colonies in the New World and opened up that section of the country to civilization. As the years passed, and the population of that region rapidly increased, brave pioneers made their way into the wild districts farther west. The names of Daniel Boone and Simon Kenton were enduringly inscribed upon the records of Kentucky, that of John Jacob Astor upon the history of Michigan and other states of the upper Mississippi valley. Later Kit Carson and John C. Fremont made their way into the mountainous districts west of the “father of waters’ and subsequently the explorers penetrated into the vast wildnesses of the Pacific slope. The development of the northwest, however, is comparatively recent, but when time shall have made the era of progress here a part of the history of the past, the names of men no less brave and resolute than those who came to the shores of New England or made their way into the Mississippi valley will be found illuminating the annals of this section of the Union, and on the list will be found that of Joel Beauford Harper, who is numbered among the early settlers of both California and Idaho. Mr. Harper was born in Georgetown, Scott County, Kentucky, October 15, 1837. His father,...

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Odell, Sarah Holman – Obituary

Her maiden name was Holman, and she was born in Kentucky, December 10, 1803. When she was about eight years of age, her parents moved to Indiana and settled in Wayne County. Here she grew up to womanhood; and there, on March 30, 1820, she was united in marriage to John O’Dell. In 1825 she and her husband moved to Tippecanoe County and in March 1826, they moved to Carroll County. Theirs was among the first white families settling in this county, and for a time the only white family in the township in which the town of Camden is situated. Their doors were thrown open wide to the pioneers who were seeking homes in that county and many availed themselves to their hospitality. In childhood she gave her heart to God and early in their married life she and her husband united with the Methodist Episcopal Church, under the ministry of Russel Bigelow. Their home was a Christian home, and they endeavored to bring up their children in the nurture and admonition of the Lord; and, as a result, their ten children who grew to manhood and womanhood were all converted early in life and united with the Methodist Episcopal Church. In the spring of 1851 they left their home in Carrol County for Oregon, by the overland route; and the last of September they reached Yamhill County,...

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Alderman, Albert Lockwood – Obituary

A. L. Alderman died at the home of his son near Dayton on Christmas Eve [December 24, 1908], aged 88 years. The funeral took place on Saturday, conducted by Rev. A. J. Hunsaker of this city an old-time friend and neighbor. Mr. Alderman was a Yamhill County pioneer of 1846. He was born at Old Bedford, Connecticut, December 16, 1820. The family home for most of his boyhood was near Warsaw, N.Y. He was 25 years old when he crossed the plains. His party came by way of Southern Oregon and lost their wagons in the Rogue River. Mr. Alderman took up a land claim near Dayton, and when the rush to California occurred in the summer of 1849 he went to the gold fields and stayed three months. He brought back some bags of gold dust with which he had a sawmill built on his place. Some of the oldest houses in Yamhill County were made from the lumber of this mill. In 1852 he was married to Mary Jane Burns of Polk County. She died in 1864, leaving four children. They are Mina (Mrs. F. K. Hubbard), William Alderman, Maritta, (Mrs. McCowan), all of whom live at Falls City, Polk County, and Medorum Alderman, now in California. In 1866 Mr. Alderman married Miss Charlotte Ruth Odell of Dayton. They had five children: Edwin, who died a year...

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Lambert, John A. – Obituary

John A. Lambert was born in Nashville, Tenn., Feb. 10, 1845, and died July 28, 1917, making him 72 years, 5 months and 18 days old. From Nashville he went with his parents to Illinois, and from there to Missouri.. In 1864 his parents died and he with an older brother crossed the plains, arriving in Oregon in December, 1869. He was converted and joined the Methodist Church of which he was a lifelong member. He was united in marriage to Miss Mary Ellen Coovert, March 13, 1870. Their home was on a farm four miles south of Dayton until 1904, when they moved to McMinnville, Ore. He leaves to mourn his death, three sons, Charles Lambert of Ritzville, Wash., Arthur Lambert of North Powder, Ore., Chester Lambert of McMinnville, and one daughter, Mrs. Juanita May Palmer of McMinnville, Ore. The cause of his death was hardening of the arteries from which he was a long-time sufferer. The funeral was held on Monday at the Methodist Church conducted by Rev. Lester D. Fields with burial in Masonic Cemetery. The pallbearers were Arthur McPhillips, M. F. Corrigan, O. D. Scott, Frank Odell, Sylvester Robinson and Ivan Daniels. [Interment Odell Cemetery] Contributed by: Shelli...

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Lambert, Arthur E. – Obituary

A. E. Lambert Passes Life Arthur E. Lambert, 52, cost accountant for the Portland bureau of water works, died Sunday at the United States veterans hospital in Portland. His parents were pioneers of Yamhill county, his mother having crossed the plains in 1852. Mr. Lambert was born near Dayton, February 13, 1876. He was educated at Corvallis and at the University of Oregon. At the outbreak of the Spanish-American war he enlisted in the Second Oregon regiment and was in numerous engagements in the Philippine islands, serving throughout the war as corporal of company A. For a number of years Mr. Lambert lived in Pendleton, where he was assistant cashier of the Pendleton Savings bank. He moved to North Powder to become cashier of the North Powder State bank. In 1903 he married Mae Smyth of Dayton, and is survived by his wife, a son Eldon, a daughter, La Valle, his mother, Mary E. Lambert, a brother, C.Q. Lambert, a sister, Mrs. J.O. Palmer, all of Portland, and a brother, Chester Lambert, of Umatilla. Mr. Lambert was prominent in civic affairs and last year he was senior vice-commander of the Scout Young camp, Spanish War Veterans. Funeral services were held at the Edward Holman & Sons parlors at 2:30 P.M. and Spanish War Veterans were in charge. Oregon Trail Weekly North Powder News Saturday, July 11,...

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Pratt, Zona Marie Taylor Mrs. – Obituary

North Powder, Union County, Oregon Zona Marie Pratt, 64, of Dayton Ore., and a former North Powder resident, died Monday, June 13, 2005, at Willamette Valley Medical Center. Memorial Service will be held today, June 16, 1 p.m. at Church on the Hill, McMinnville, Ore., with Pastor Lon Eckdahl officiating. A private family burial will take place. A potluck reception will follow the service at the Palmer Creek Lodge, 606 4th Street in Dayton. Zona was born Jan. 1, 1941, at Klamath Falls to William Thomas and Mary Lucille Cutshall Taylor. She was the second daughter in a family of eight children. She came from a large family that was proud of their Native American Heritage and was a member of the Madesi Band of the Pit River Tribe. She was raised in North Powder, where she met and married Larry Pratt in 1957 in Haines. They were later divorced. In 1975, she moved to Dayton. She attended the Church on the Hill in McMinnville. The family said, “The joy she found in life was her children and grandchildren, and she came from a very strong and close-knit supportive family.” She loved music and played the piano and accordion by ear. Survivors include her sons, Ken “Scott” Pratt of McMinnville, Jim Pratt of Melba, Idaho, Curtis Pratt of Dayton, Ray Pratt of McMinnville, and Shawn Pratt of Dayton; daughter,...

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Chambers, Archie B. – Obituary

Archie B. Chambers, 81, died this morning at St. Charles Memorial Hospital. He had been a Bend resident eight months, coming here from Fall City. He made his home at 133 1/2 Broadway Avenue. Mr. Chambers was a native of Dayton, Oregon. He is survived by a cousin, Mrs. Retta L. Montney of Fall City. The funeral is tentatively scheduled for Dallas, at a time to be announced later. The Niswonger-Winslow Chapel is in charge of local arrangements. The Bend Bulletin, March 18, 1958 Contributed by: Shelli...

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Humphreys, Sarah Lulu Odell – Obituary

Humphreys, Sarah L.-Age 80, November 5, 1962 of Vancouver, Wash. Born November 5, 1882 at Dayton, Ore. Lived in Vancouver since 1948. Resided at 1012 West Twenty-first St. Formerly of California and member of a pioneer family of Willamette Valley in Oregon. Son Norman Humphreys, Vancouver, Wash.; Daughter, Lois M. Humphreys, Vancouver, Wash. There are two grandchildren and three great grandchildren. Brother, Albert L. Odell, Portland, Ore. Funeral services at 3 p.m., Thursday, November 8 at the Vancouver Funeral Chapel with the Rev. Edward Hastings officiating. Vault interment in Brush Prairie Cemetery. Vancouver Funeral Chapel is in charge of arrangements. Contributed by: Shelli...

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Farnsworth, Jesse Elmer – Obituary

Jesse E. Farnsworth, a former resident of 620 S.E. 2nd Ave. in Canby, died at a Canby nursing home early Thursday [April 10] morning at the age of 84. He was born to Levi and Annie Farnsworth at Dayton, Ore. June 11, 1895. As a child, he moved to Multnomah County and attended Gilbert School for eight years and then spent two years at Washington High School. He worked in a furniture store in Portland for 10 years, and later owned and operated a grocery store at Lents. He was a World War I veteran. He married Hazel M. Mason at Portland on August 21, 1920 and she died March 29, 1976. Mr. Farnsworth was a charter member of the American Legion Post #122 at Canby and a member of the World War I Veterans Champoeg Barracks #205 at Molalla. Surviving are two sons, Ray Farnsworth of Canby and Bert Farnsworth of Jennings Lodge; five grandchildren and eight great grandchildren. Funeral services were held at 11 a.m. Saturday, April 12, at the Canby Chapel of Everhart and Kent. Interment followed at Zion Memorial Park. The Canby Herald, April 16, 1980 Contributed by: Shelli...

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Biography of Albert L. Alderman

ALBERT L. ALDERMAN. – The pioneer experiences of Mr. Alderman are not exceeded in interest by those of any of the early settlers. Born at Old Bedford, Connecticut, and taken as a child to Wyoming county, New York, where he lived until twenty-one years of age, he set out at the age of twenty-four upon the career that did not end except upon the Pacific coast. He was at Bradford, Pennsylvania, for a time with an uncle, and in 1845 came out to Quincy, Illinois, and that same winter made up an outfit for coming to the mythical Oregon. At St. Louis, in March, he met a Mr. Good and Judge Quinn Thornton, who were also on the way to our state. At the rendezvous he found a large company assembling, aggregating five hundred wagons. An organization, the most complete that had ever been attempted, was here made. The wagons and outfits were inspected; and none unfit for the journey were allowed to proceed. A legal tribunal was established, having a judge and a jury, which was composed of six men. The military organization was also fully equal to the requirements. On the way to Fort Hall no more serious trouble was experienced than crossing swollen streams; and this was effected by using two large canoes lashed side by side into which the loaded wagons were run, with the...

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Biography of Hon. John B. Allen

HON. JOHN B. ALLEN. – “I think Walla Walla is destined to be the central and commercial city of that large area of country in Eastern Washington lying south of the Snake river, and of much of Eastern Oregon. Probably no city of its population in the Northwest equals it in wealth. It is just now emerging from years of transportation extortions, which few other regions could have borne. Competitive systems will infuse new life to every industry, and stimulate the developments of resources heretofore lying dormant.” This is the horoscope of the young city as cast by Mr. Allen; and his opinions are certainly of great weight. He has been a resident of the territory since 1870; and, as United States attorney for Washington under Grant, Hayes and Garfield, he has visited nearly every locality within the field of his labors; and his opportunities for forming correct judgment have been very extensive. While a citizen of Dayton or Pendleton could not be expected to agree with him fully, and Spokane Falls and North Yakima would naturally demur from his opinion that the Blue Mountain slopes are the finest in the territory, the unbiased mind will, at least, regard his view with interest. Mr. Allen is one of the territory’s most prominent citizens. As delegate to the United States Congress, he has achieved a lasting fame, and will leave...

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Biography of Daniel Chaplin

DANIEL CHAPLIN. – The subject of this sketch was born in Niagara county, New York, in 1823. He was educated in his native place, and became a surveyor, removing to Michigan. Honest, upright and much respected, he was one of those men of broad ideas and indefatigable energy who create prosperity for any community in which they settle. Having heard much of Oregon, its boundless resources and delightful climate, he crossed the plains in 1854, settling near Champoeg in Marion county. From there he moved to where Sheridan, in Yamhill county, now stands, and thence to Dayton, Yamhill county. In the spring of 1862, he located in La Grande, Union county, and built the first house in that place. Through his efforts, he succeeded in having the land-office for Eastern Oregon located there, and for fifteen consecutive years held the position of receiver of the land-office, when he resigned on account of the accumulation of other business on his hands. The arduous duties of this office were conducted by him with admirable promptness and honesty; and the settlers who came to transact business with the office were always treated with great consideration. In 1864 he was elected to the legislature of Oregon, and gave entire satisfaction to his constituents. In 1865 he, in conjunction with Green Arnold, established the present water system of La Grande, and laid the first...

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