Location: Concord New Hampshire

News from New England – King Phillip’s War

Being a true and last account of the present Bloody Wars carried on betwixt the infidels, natives, and the English Christians, and converted Indians of New England, declaring the many dreadful battles fought betwixt them: As also the many towns and villages burnt by the merciless heathens. And also the true number of all the Christians slain since the beginning of that War, As it was sent over by a factor of New England to a merchant in London. Licensed Aug. 1. Roger L’Estrange. London. Printed for J. Corners, at the sign of the Black Raven in Duck-Lane, 1676. 1The following tract is of exceeding rarity; so much so that, not long since, but one was known to be in this country. This is reprinted from a copy of one in the library of John Carter Brown Esq., of Providence. To the politeness of this gentleman we are indebted for permission to make a transcript. The original is, without exception, one of the worst printed tracts of the day in which it appeared. The type on which it was printed was wretched, especially the Italic; some of the letters in many of the words not being distinguishable, and others entirely wanting. I have adhered, in this reprint, as closely to the original, in respect to orthography, capitals, and italics, as possible. Of its comparative value, in an historical point...

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Narrative of the Captivity of Frances Noble – Indian Captivities

Narrative of the captivity of Frances Noble, who was, among others, taken by the Indians from Swan Island, in Maine, about the year 1755; compiled by John Kelly, Esq. of Concord, New Hampshire, from the minutes and memoranda of Phinehas Merrill. Esq. of Stratham, in the same state; and by the Former Gen. Tleman communicated for publication to the editors of the Historical Collections of New Hampshire.

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Narrative of the Captivity of Mrs. Isabella M’coy – Indian Captivities

Narrative of the Captivity of Mrs. Isabella M’coy, who was taken Captive at Epsom, N. H., in the Year 1747. Collected From the Recollections of Aged People who knew her, by the Rev. Jonathan Curtis, a Minister of that Town, about Seventeen Years ago, and by Him Communicated to the Publishers of the New Hampshire Historical Collections. The Indians were first attracted to the new settlements in the town of Epsom, N. H., by discovering M’Coy at Suncook, now Pembroke. This, as nearly as can be ascertained, was in the year 1747. Reports were spread of the depredations of the Indians in various places; and M’Coy had heard that they had been seen lurking about the woods at Penacook, now Concord. He went as far as Pembroke; ascertained that they were in the vicinity; was somewhere discovered by them, and followed home. They told his wife, whom they afterwards made prisoner, that they looked through cracks around the house, and saw what they had for supper that night. They however did not discover themselves till the second day after. They probably wished to take a little time to learn the strength and preparation of the inhabitants. The next day, Mrs. M’Coy, attended by their two dogs, went down to see if any of the other families had returned from the garrison. She found no one. On her return, as...

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Narrative of the Captivity of Nehemiah How

A Narrative of the captivity of Nehemiah How, who was taken by the Indians at the Great Meadow Fort above Fort Dummer, where he was an inhabitant, October 11th, 1745. Giving an account of what he met with in his traveling to Canada, and while he was in prison there. Together with an account of Mr. How’s death at Canada. Exceedingly valuable for the many items of exact intelligence therein recorded, relative to so many of the present inhabitants of New England, through those friends who endured the hardships of captivity in the mountain deserts and the damps of loathsome prisons. Had the author lived to have returned, and published his narrative himself, he doubtless would have made it far more valuable, but he was cut off while a prisoner, by the prison fever, in the fifty-fifth year of his age, after a captivity of one year, seven months, and fifteen days. He died May 25th, 1747, in the hospital at Quebec, after a sickness of about ten days. He was a husband and father, and greatly beloved by all who knew him.

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Biography of Oscar F. Richardson

Oscar F. Richardson, a wellknown citizen of Concord, was born at Southbridge, Vt., January 2, 1835, son of Hazen and Zilby (Whitcomb) Richardson. Hazen Richardson was a native of the State of New Hampshire, and was a carpenter by trade. He removed to Whitehall, N.Y., quite early in life, and passed most of his 1860, at the age of about seventy years. He and his wife, Zilby Whitcomb Richardson, had eight children; namely, Delilah, Dequesna, Lillian, Cornelia, Oscar F., Henrietta, Jeffers O., and Alice, of whom Delilah, Dequesna, Lillian, Jeffers O., and Alice are now deceased. Oscar F. Richardson, after being educated in the district schools of Stockbridge, Vt., first found employment in the woollen-mills of that town, where he continued for the next five years. He then went to Massachusetts, where he remained for about two years. At the end of that time he came to Concord, to take charge of the finishing-rooms in the mills of Messrs. B. F. & D. Holden, which have since been incorporated as the Concord Manufacturing Company; and he remained in their employ some seven years. He was subsequently appointed a station agent for the C. & C. Railroad, which position he held for more than six years. He was then employed at the Concord Water Works at West Concord, and was also appointed superintendent of Penacook Park. He was also connected...

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Biography of John Evans Robertson

John Evans Robertson, a wellknown ice dealer of Concord, was born May 9, 1843, in Warner, N.H., son of Harrison D. and Sarah C. (Evans) Robertson, both of Warner. The families of both parents were old residents of Merrimack County, New Hampshire. The maternal ancestors originally came from Newburyport, Mass., where Grandfather Benjamin Evans officiated as Sheriff, being also a prominent business man. John E. Robertson attended the public schools of Warner, and subsequently fitted for college in the academy at Henniker, N.H. However, after leaving school at the age of eighteen, he did not go to college. In 1864 he went to Montreal, and there engaged in the produce business, under the firm name of Buck, Robertson & Co. Six years later, on account of ill health, he returned to Warner, where he conducted a country store until 1874, when he came to Concord. Here he was assistant cashier of the National Savings Bank for eight years. Beginning in 1882 he dealt in coal, wood, and ice until 1888, when he sold out on account of failing health. Three years later he resumed the ice business, which he still carries on. He is a trustee and the assistant treasurer of the National Savings Bank. When the institution went into liquidation in 1877, he was appointed assignee by the court. He is also a trustee of the Guarantee Savings...

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Biography of Charles M. Rolfe

Charles M. Rolfe, a well-known manufacturer of Concord, is a native of this city, born August 18, 1841, son of Nathaniel and Mary J. (Moody) Rolfe. His paternal grandfather, also named Nathaniel, was one of the pioneer settlers of Concord, and came here from Haverhill, Mass. He secured the first water-power operated on the Merrimack River, and carried on a considerable lumbering business besides being engaged in farming. This water-power is still in possession of the family, and has been for the past seventy-five years. Grandfather Rolfe died in 1829, full of years and honor, and left to his sons the valuable water privilege above mentioned, besides a large tract of timber land. Nathaniel Rolfe, Jr., father of Charles M., was also a farmer and lumberman. He carried on a large trade, and furnished lumber for the frames of many of the great mills at Lawrence and Lowell, Mass. He is still living, a hale and hearty man, at the age of eighty-three years. His wife was Miss Mary J. Moody, a daughter of Joseph Moody, of Canterbury. She became the mother of six children-Charles, Joseph, Abial, John, Mary, and Arthur. Mary died at the age of nine years. Joseph was a New Hampshire sharpshooter in the Civil War, and saw much active service. He is now a resident of Minneapolis, Minn., where he deals in real estate and...

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Biographical Sketch of Robert H. Rolfe

Robert H. Rolfe, the courteous and efficient cashier and advertising manager of the Republican Press Association at Concord, N.H., was born here, October 16, 1863, and is the son of Henry Pearson and Mary Rebecca (Sherburne) Rolfe, of this city. In his boyhood he attended the public schools of Concord, and, after graduating from the high school, entered Dartmouth College, where he was graduated in the class of 1884. He then for a short time engaged in the study of law; but, feeling more inclination for a business career, he abandoned the thought of a profession, and entered the employ of the Boston & Lowell Railroad as an accountant. He afterward served the Boston & Maine Railroad in the same capacity. In 1889 he went to North Adams, Mass., as assistant superintendent of the Zylonite Manufacturing New Jersey. He then returned to Concord, and soon after was offered his present position of cashier and advertising manager of the Republican Press Association, which he fills with great acceptance to all concerned. After graduating from college, he entered the New Hampshire National Guard as a private in Company C of the Third Regiment of New Hampshire, and has been rapidly promoted until three years ago he attained the rank of Colonel in the regiment, and has held it ever since. Colonel Rolfe makes a fine officer; and not only is he...

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Biography of Daniel B. Sanborn

Daniel B. Sanborn, a successful farmer of East Concord, Merrimack County, was born in Webster, N.H., April 12, 1840, son of Daniel and Sally (Batchelder) Sanborn. Mr. Sanborn’s grandfather, Tristam Sanborn, came to Webster with his wife and her parents, and took up land on what is now known as Sanborn and Clough’s Hill. He lived to be quite an old man, and remained in this place until his death. He had a large family of children, of whom Daniel, father of the subject of this sketch, was the youngest but one. Daniel Sanborn moved to Canterbury when his son Daniel B. was but an infant. He bought a farm there, but later came to East Concord, and spent his last days here, dying at the age of seventy-two years. During his early life he worked for a time as a stone cutter, but subsequently devoted himself to farming. While living in Canterbury he served as Selectman. His wife, Sally Batchelder Sanborn, was a daughter of Samuel Batchelder, of Northwood, N.H. Their family consisted of four children, including the subject of this sketch: Ann is the wife of Charles L. Brown, and resides in Concord; Frank, the youngest son, married Hattie Blanchard, and has two sons; Mary Etta is unmarried. Daniel B. Sanborn, the eldest child of his parents, received his education in the district schools of Canterbury and...

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Biography of Charles Eastman Staniels

Charles Eastman Staniels, a prominent life insurance agent of Concord, N.H., was born in Lowell, Mass., December 27, 1844, son of Edward L. and Ruth Bradley (Eastman) Staniels. The father, born in Chichester, N.H., for many years was interested in the drug business, successively in Lowell and Boston, Mass. Toward the latter part of his life he removed to Roxbury, Mass., then a suburb of Boston, and died there at the age of sixty-five years. He was twice married. By his first wife there were three children, all of whom are now dead. His second marriage was made with Ruth Bradley Eastman, now over eighty-five years old, whose only child is the subject of this sketch. A daughter of General Isaac Eastman, of Concord, N.H., she is a direct descendant, in the sixth generation, of Captain Ebenezer Eastman, the first settler of Concord, and of Captain Edward Johnson, the historian of Woburn, Mass., one of the commissioners appointed by the General Court of Massachusetts Bay Colony to fix the northern boundary of that colony in 1652. In 1833 a large boulder was discovered at the entrance of Lake Winnepesaukee at Weirs, N.H., bearing the initials of Governor John Endicott, with those of the commissioners, Captain Edward Johnson and Captain Symon Willard, which had remained unnoticed and subject to elemental conditions for one hundred and eighty-one years. The State of...

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Biography of Charles F. M. Stark

Charles F. M. Stark, a wellknown resident of Dunbarton, Merrimack County, was born in this town, February 18, 1848, son of John and Caroline J. (Morris) Stark. He is a great-great-grandson of General John Stark, the famous victor of Bennington. John Stark, the father, was a lawyer, who practised his profession in Galena, Ill., and in New York City. He died in Washington, D.C., at the age of forty-two years. His wife, Caroline, was the youngest daughter of Thomas Morris, and a grand-daughter of Robert Morris, signer of the Declaration of Independence and first Secretary of State of the United States. Charles F. M. Stark was a student at St. Paul’s School in Concord. After leaving school, he resided for a number of years in New York City, and for a time was interested in insurance in New York and Boston. He finally returned to the family homestead in Dunbarton, where he has since resided, it having become his property through inheritance. The house was built by his great-grandfather, Major Caleb Stark, a son of General John Stark, and who did good service to his county in the Revolutionary War. It was built after the model of an English manor house, and is a quaint and interesting piece of architecture. Every room it contains is replete with historic memories. Heirlooms and relics both of the Stark and Morris families...

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Biography of Albert Stevens

Albert Stevens, a farmer of Concord, was born at Canterbury, N.H., January 24, 1833, and is a representative of the third generation of the Stevens family born in this town. His paternal grandfather, whose name, it is believed, was Simeon Stevens, was a farmer and lifelong resident of Canterbury. He attained an advanced age, and was the father of six sons and four daughters. Three of the sons-Moses, John, and Thomas -went West, and settled in Princeton, Ill., where they grew prosperous and married. John Stevens had a son who became extremely wealthy, and two of the sons of Simeon Stevens became members of Congress. Jesse Stevens, father of Albert, remained in his native town when his brothers went West, and in course of time became one of its leading citizens. Early in life he began to teach, and he followed that occupation for some years. He lived to be sixty-one years old, and at the time of his death had been Selectman of the town for many years. He married Abigail Sherborne, of Epsom; and they had seven children-Harriet, Mary A., Sylvester, Caroline, Susan T., Nancy, and Albert. Mary is the wife of Rufus Virgin, a sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this work; Sylvester lives in East Concord; Caroline, who is the widow of Stephen Clark, resides at Littleton, Mass.; Nancy, who lives in Concord, is the...

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Biography of Rev. John Vannevar

Rev. John Vannevar, born in South Malden, now Everett, Mass., on June 23, 1857, was the youngest of three children of Aaron B. and Dorothy G. Vannevar, both of whom were born in Amherst, Mass. He lived in the place of his birth until twelve years of age, when the family moved to Summer Street, Malden. He was educated in the public schools, completing the college course in the Malden High School and graduating in 1876. He then entered Tufts College, graduating with the degree of Bachelor of Divinity in 1880, and taking a post-graduate course of one year. He was ordained to the work of the Christian ministry of the Universalist church in the home church of that faith in Malden on November 23, 1880. Called to the pastorate of the Universalist society in Amesbury in the summer of 1881, he remained there two years, during which period he was married to Gertrude F. Swasey, of Malden. Because of impaired health the winter of 1883 and 1884 was spent in Florida. Soon after returning, he accepted a call to the pastorate of the First Universalist Society of Canton, Mass., where were born a son and a daughter. In the winter of 1887, because of a bronchial affection, a leave of absence was granted him; and he spent a portion of the cold season in Southern California, but was...

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Biography of Rufus Virgin

Rufus Virgin, a prosperous farmer and well-known citizen of Concord, was born on the Virgin homestead, where he now resides, January 7, 1818, son of Isaac and Susan (Batchelder) Virgin. He is a descendant of Ebenezer Virgin, second, one of the old proprietors of New Hampshire. The Virgin family has been closely identified with the history of Concord since the town was first settled. Jonathan Virgin, grandfather of Rufus, took up new land here, cleared it, and became the owner of a large farm. He died at about sixty years of age. His wife, in maidenhood Sarah Austin, was the mother of four sons and one daughter. Isaac Virgin was brought up to agricultural pursuits, and received his education in the district school. The school-house was a long distance from the farm; but, not discouraged by that, he was a regular attendant as well as a diligent student. When he came into possession of the farm, which he did previous to the War of 1812, he built a substantial set of buildings, which are standing to-day, but little the worse for the ravages of time. He died June 12, 1870, Susan, was born March 4, 1790, and died in 1876. She was the mother of four children-Susan C., Eliza J., Rufus, and William H. Susan C. married the Rev. Caleb Fales, a Methodist minister, and died not long after...

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Biography of Irving Allison Watson, M.D.

Irving Allison Watson, M.D., of Concord, born at Salisbury, this State, September 6, 1849, is a son of Porter Baldwin, born at Corinth, Vt., July 13, 1825, and Luvia E. (Ladd) Watson; grandson of Ithamar Watson, born at Weare, N.H., September 17, 1784; and great-grandson of Caleb Watson, born at Hampstead, N.H., December 6, 1760, who was a soldier in the Revolution. Having received his preliminary education in the common schools of New Hampshire and at the Newbury (Vt.) Seminary and Collegiate Institute, he commenced the study of medicine in 1868 with Dr. Cochrane, of Newbury, Vt., and continued it successively with his uncle, Dr. H. L. Watson, and Dr. A. B. Crosby, of New York. Then he attended lectures at Dartmouth Medical College and at the medical department of the University of Vermont, graduating a Doctor of Medicine from the latter institution in 1871. Afterward, in 1885, Dartmouth College conferred on him the degree of Master of Arts. Immediately after graduating in medicine, Dr. Watson commenced practice at Groveton (Northumberland), N.H., where he remained ten years. In that period he was Superintendent of Schools for some years, in 1879 and 1881 he was in the State legislature, and he was surgeon to the Grand Trunk Railway. In the legislature he was largely instrumental in securing the passage of the act creating the State Board of Health. Of this...

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