Location: Clay County MS

The Chickasaw War of 1739

Through the instigation of The French the war was continued between the seemingly infatuated and blinded Choctaws and Chickasaws during the entire year 1737, yet without any perceptibly advantageous results to either. A long and bitter experience seemed wholly inadequate to teach them the selfish designs of the French. No one can believe the friendship of the French for the Choctaws was unassumed. They were unmerciful tyrants by whatever standard one may choose to measure them, and without a redeeming quality as far as their dealings with the North American Indians go to prove; and their desire for the good of that race of people utterly out...

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Slave Narrative of Jim Allen

Interviewer: Mrs. Ed Joiner Person Interviewed: Jim Allen Location: West Point, Mississippi Age: 87 Jim Allen, West Point, age 87, lives in a shack furnished by the city. With him lives his second wife, a much older woman. Both he and his wife have a reputation for being “queer” and do not welcome outside visitors. However, he readily gave an interview and seemed most willing to relate the story of his life. “Yas, ma’m, I ‘members lots about slav’ry time, ’cause I was old ‘nough. “I was born in Russell County, Alabamy, an’ can tell you ’bout my own mammy an’ pappy an’ sisters an’ brudders. “Mammy’s name was Darkis an’ her Marster was John Bussey, a reg’lar old drunkard, an’ my pappy’s name was John Robertson an’ b’longed to Dr. Robertson, a big farmer on Tombigbee river, five miles east of Columbus. De doctor hisself lived in Columbus. “My sister Harriett and brudder John was fine fiel’ hands an’ Marster kep’ ’em in de fiel’ most of de time, tryin’ to dodge other white folks. “Den dere was Sister Vice an’ brudder George. Befo’ I could ‘member much, I ‘members Lee King had a saloon close to Bob Allen’s store in Russell County, Alabama, and Marse John Bussey drunk my mammy up. I means by dat, Lee King tuk her an’ my brudder George fer a whiskey debt....

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Slave Narrative of Clara C. Young

Person Interviewed: Clara C. Young Location: Mississippi Age: 95 Place of Residence: Monroe County, Mississippi Clara C. Young, ex-slave, Monroe County, is approximately 95 years old, about five feet two inches tall, and weighs 105 pounds. She is a frail, dark skinned Negro, with the typical broad nose and the large mouth of the southern Negro. Her physical condition is especially good for a woman of her age. She is very talkative at times, but her memory appears to come and go, so that she has to be prompted at intervals in her story-telling by her daughter or granddaughter, with whom she lives. Familiarly known as “Aunt Classie,” she is very proud of her age and more especially of her long line of descendants. “Law, Miss, I doan know when I was born, but I do know dat I’se sebenteen years old when I was fust sol’. Dey put me an’ my brudder up on de auction block at de same time. He brung $1400 but I dis’members zactly what dey paid far me. Wa’nt dat much, tho’, fer big strong mans brung mo’ dan wimmens an’ gals.” Long pauses accentuated the quavery voice of the old Negro, whose head resembled a nappy patch of cotton, and who was so enthusiastic over reminiscing about the days when she was young and carefree. “I was born in Huntsville, Alabamy, an’...

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Biography of Charles R. Freeman

Since 1902 Charles R. Freeman has been practicing law in Checotah, and he is numbered among the representative members of the legal profession in the state. He was born in Clay county, Mississippi, on the 8th of November, 1875, a son of John P. and Anna (Lyon) Freeman, the former a native of North Carolina and the latter of Mississippi. For some time the father followed agricultural pursuits in his native state and upon the outbreak of the Civil war continued to reside there until the last year of the war, when he enlisted for active service. At the close of the war he went to Mississippi where he bought some land and previous to his death he owned several plantations. His demise occurred in February, 1902. Mrs. Freeman died in May, 1883. Charles R. Freeman received his early education in the common schools of Clay county, Mississippi, and later enrolled in the Iuka Normal Institute at Iuka, that state, graduating from that institution in 1898, with the A. B. degree. Subsequently, determining upon a legal career, he entered the University of Mississippi at Oxford and he received his LL. B. degree in 1901. For the following year he practiced in Starkville, Mississippi, and in October, 1902, came to Checotah. He has built up an extensive and lucrative practice and handles much important litigation before the courts. He has...

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