Location: Chattahoochee County GA

Native American History of Chattahoochee County, Georgia

Chattahoochee County is located in west central Georgia and is part of the Columbus, GA Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area. It was named after the Chattahoochee River. Most of Chattahoochee County is occupied by Fort Benning, one of the U. S. Army’s largest facilities. The county seat of Chattahoochee County is the town of Cusseta. Cusseta is the anglicized version of the name of an important division of the Creek Indian Confederacy, the Kvse-te; pronounced Ka(u-jzhe(-te-. Kvse-te is an Itza Maya word, written as Kaax’i-te in Mexico, which means “People of the Forested Mountains.” When Savannah was settled in 1732, the British Colonists called the Kvse-te, the Kashita. The popular explanation of the meaning of Chattahoochee is that it is Creek word meaning, “River with the shining rocks.” This is probably not accurate. Until the late 1700s, there was a large Creek town with several mounds, where Six Flags Over Georgia is now located. In the Itsate (Hitchiti-Creek) language, it was named Cata-hvci (pronounced Chata-hawchee,) which literally means “Red River” in Itsate-Creek. The river at this town site is often clay red and contains no visible stones. When most of the Creeks were forcibly deported to the Indian Territory (Oklahoma,) they called a principal river through their lands, the Red River. Chattahoochee County is bounded on the north by Muskogee County, GA. On the northeast, it adjoins Talbot County, GA....

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Hitchiti Indians

Hitchiti Tribe. Perhaps from Atcik-hata, a term formerly applied to all of the Indians who spoke the Hitchiti language, and is said to refer to the heap of white ashes piled up close to the ceremonial ground. Also called: At-pasha-shliha, Koasati name, meaning “mean people.” Hitchiti Connections. The Hitchiti belonged to the Muskhogean linguistic family and were considered the mother town of the Atcik-hata group. (See Apalachicola) Hitchiti Location. The Hitchiti are oftenest associated with a location in the present Chattahoochee County, Georgia, but at an earlier period were on the lower course of the Ocmulgee River. (See also Florida and Oklahoma.) Hitchiti Villages Hihaje, location unknown. Hitchitoochee, on Flint River below its junction with Kinchafoonee Creek. Tuttallosag, on a creek of the same name, 20 miles west from Hitchitoochee. Hitchiti History. The Hitchiti are identifiable with the Ocute of De Soto’s chroniclers, who were on or near the Ocmulgee River. Early English maps show their town on the site of the present Macon, Georgia, but after 1715 they moved to the Chattahoochee, settling first in Henry County, Alabama, but later at the site above mentioned in Chattahoochee County, Georgia. From this place they moved to Oklahoma, where they gradually merged with the rest of the Indians of the Creek Confederacy. Hitchiti Population. The population of the Hitchiti is usually given in conjunction with that of the other confederate...

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Muskogee Indians

Muskogee. Meaning unknown, but perhaps originally from Shawnee and having reference to swampy ground. To this tribe the name Creeks was ordinarily applied. Also called: Ani’-Gu’sa, by the Cherokee, meaning “Coosa people,” after an ancient and famous town on Coosa River. Ku-û’sha, by the Wyandot. Ochesee, by the Hitchiti. Sko’-ki han-ya, by the Biloxi. Muskogee Connections. The Muskogee language constitutes one division of the Muskhogean tongues proper, that which I call Northern. Muskogee Location. From the earliest times of which we have any record these people seem to have had towns all the way from the Atlantic coast of Georgia and the neighborhood of Savannah River to central Alabama. (See also Florida, Louisiana, Oklahoma, Tennessee, and Texas.) Muskogee Villages It is difficult to separate major divisions of the Muskogee from towns and towns from villages, but there were certainly several distinct Muskogee tribes at a very early period. The following subdivisional classification is perhaps as good as any: Abihka (in St. Clair, Calhoun, and Talladega Counties): Abihka-in-the-west, a late branch of Abihka in the western part of the Creek Nation, Okla. Abihkutci, on Tallassee Hatchee Creek, Talladega County, on the right bank 5 miles from Coosa River. Kan-tcati, on or near Chocolocko, or Choccolocco, Creek and probably not far from the present “Conchardee.” Kayomalgi, possibly settled by Shawnee or Chickasaw, probably near Sylacauga, Talladega County. Lun-ham-ga, location unknown. Talladega,...

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