Location: Charlotte North Carolina

Charlotte North Carolina High School Yearbooks

These are a variety of  Charlotte NC High School yearbooks for Mecklenburg County, North Carolina. If your ancestor attended high school during the years of 1909-1962 in Charlotte North Carolina then the following yearbooks may have a photograph of them. This is part of a collection of free yearbooks being scanned and placed online by the North Carolina Digital Heritage Center. Yearbooks provide a window into student life. From sports teams to clubs, fashions to hairstyles, these volumes document the changing attitudes and culture of students year by year. The North Carolina Digital Heritage Center is a statewide digitization...

Read More

Slave Narrative of Annie Groves Scott

Person Interviewed: Annie Groves Scott Place of Birth: Lyonsville, South Carolina Date of Birth: March 18, 1845 Just before the war broke out I was fifteen year old and my mistress told me I was born March 18, 1845, at a little place she called Lyonsville, South Carolina. Maw (that’s all the name she ever called her mother) was born at Charlotte, N.C., and father was born at Lyonsville, same as me, and his name was Levi Grant, which changed to Groves when he was sold by Master Grant. That was when I was a baby and I wants to tell you about that on down the line. I had a brother name of Robert. How old my folks was I never know, but I know their folks come from Africa on a slave boat. One of my uncles who was done brought here from that place, and who was a slave boatman on the Savannah river, he never learned to talked plain, mostly just jabber like the Negroes done when they first get here. Maw told about how the white people fool the Negroes onto the slave boat; how the boatmen would build pens on the shore and put red pieces of cloth in the pens and the fool Negroes would tear the pen down almost getting them ownselves after the cloth and then getting caught. Then they...

Read More

Slave Narrative of Dan Smith

Interviewer: W. W. Dixon Person Interviewed: Dan Smith Location: Winnsboro, South Carolina Place of Birth: Richland County SC Date of Birth: January 11, 1862 Age: 75 Occupation: Construction Dan Smith lives in one room, rent free, of a three-room frame house, the property of his son-in-law, Jim Cason. It is situated on the southeast corner of Garden and Palmer streets in the town of Winnsboro, S.C. He is tall, thin and toothless, with watery eyes and a pained expression of weariness on his face. He is slow and deliberate in movements. He still works, and has just finished a day’s work mixing mortar in the construction of a brick store building for Mr. Lauderdale. His boss says: ‘The spirit is willing but the flesh is weak.’ There is nothing organically wrong with Dan but he appears, in human anatomy, as Doctor Holmes’s One Horse Shay must have looked the day before its final collapse. “You been here once befo’ and now here you is again. You say you wanna git additions? Well, I’s told you dat I was born in Richland County, a slave of Marse John Lever and on his plantation, January de 11th day, 1862, when de war was gwine on. How I know? ‘Cause my mammy and pappy told me so. They call my pappy Bob and my mammy Mary. Strange as it seem, my mistress...

Read More

Slave Narrative of Alexander Robertson

Interviewer: W. W. Dixon Person Interviewed: Alexander Robertson Location: White Oak, South Carolina Age: 84 Ex-Slave 84 Years Old Alexander Robertson lives as a member of the household of his son, Charley, on the General Bratton plantation, four miles southeast of White Oak, S.C. It is a box-like house, chimney in the center, four rooms, a porch in front and morning glory vines, in bloom at this season, climbing around the sides and supports. Does Alexander sit here in the autumn sunshine and while the hours away? Nay, in fact he is still one of the active, working members of the family, ever in the fields with his grandchildren, poke around his neck, extracting fleecy cotton from the bolls and putting it deftly into the poke. He can carry his row equally as well as any of the six grandchildren. He has a good appetite at meal time, digestive organs good, sleeps well, and is the early riser in the mornings. He says the Negro half of his nature objects to working on Saturday afternoon, and at such times his tall figure, with a green patch cloth over the left eye, which is sightless, may be seen strolling to and fro on the streets of Winnsboro. “Well, well! If it ain’t de youngun dat use to sell me sugar, coffee, fat back and meal, when he clerk for Calvin...

Read More

Slave Narrative of Aleck Woodward

Interviewer: W. W. Dixon Person Interviewed: Aleck Woodward Location: South Carolina Age: 83 “You knows de Simonton place, Mr. Wood? Well, dats just where I was born back yonder befo’ de war, a slave of old Marster Johnnie Simonton. Five miles sorter south sunset side of Woodward Station where you was born, ain’t it so? My pappy was Ike Woodward, but him just call ‘Ike’ time of slavery, and my mammy was name Dinah. My brother Charlie up north, if he ain’t dead, Ike lives in Asheville, North Carolina. Two sisters: Ollie, her marry an Aiken, last counts, and she and her family in Charlotte, North Carolina; sister Mattie marry a Wilson nigger, but I don’t know where they is. “Us lived in a four-room log house, ’bout sixteen all told. Dere was pappy and mammy (now you count them) gran’pappy, Henry Davis, Gran’mammy Kisana, Aunt Anna, and her seven chillun, and me, and my two brothers and two sisters. How many make dat? Seventeen? Well, dat’s de number piled in dere at night in de beds and on de floors. They was scandlous beds; my God, just think of my grands, old as I is now, tryin’ to sleep on them hard beds and other folks piled ‘scriminately all over de log floors! My Gran’pappy Henry was de carpenter, and old marster tell him ‘if you make your...

Read More

Slave Narrative of Herndon Bogan

Interviewer: Mary A. Hicks Person Interviewed: Herndon Bogan Location: State Prison, Raleigh, North Carolina Place of Birth: Union County, South Carolina Age: 76 (?) Occupation: Houseboy, Night Watch Railroad Tracks An interview with Herndon Bogan, 76 (?) of State Prison, Raleigh, N. C. I wus bawned in Union County, South Carolina on de plantation o’ Doctor Bogan, who owned both my mammy Issia, an’ my pap Edwin. Dar wus six o’ us chilluns; Clara, Lula, Joe, Tux, Mack an’ me. I doan’ member much ’bout slavery days ‘cept dat my white folkses wus good ter us. Dar wus a heap o’ slaves, maybe a hundert an’ fifty. I ‘members dat we wucked hard, but we had plenty ter eat an’ w’ar, eben iffen we did w’ar wood shoes. I kin barely recolleck ‘fore de war dat I’se seed a heap o’ cocks fightin’ in pits an’ a heap o’ horse racin’. When de marster winned he ‘ud give us niggers a big dinner or a dance, but if he lost, oh! My daddy wus gived ter de doctor when de doctor wus married an’ dey shore loved each other. One day marster, he comes in an’ he sez dat de Yankees am aimin’ ter try ter take his niggers way from him, but dat dey am gwine ter ketch hell while dey does hit. When he sez dat he...

Read More

Slave Narrative of Amsy O. Alexander

Interviewer: Samuel S. Taylor Person Interviewed: Amsy O. Alexander Location: 2422 Center Street, Little Rock, Arkansas Age: 74 Occupation: Track laborer, Track foreman, Railroad builder [HW: Helps Build Railroad] “I was born in the country several miles from Charlotte in Macklenberg, County, North Carolina in 1864. “My father’s name was John Alexander and my mother was Esther McColley. That was her maiden name of course. “My father’s master was named Silas Alexander and my mother belonged to Hugh Reed. I don’t know just how she and my father happened to meet. These two slaveholders were adjoining neighbors, you might say. “My father and my mother married during the war. I was the first child. I had three half brothers and three half sisters from the father’s side. I didn’t have no whole brothers and sisters. I am the only one on my mother’s side. My father was not in the war. “I don’t know that the pateroles bothered him very much. My father and mother were well treated by our master and then both she and my father were quiet and their masters were good to them naturally. “During slavery times, my father was a farmer. My mother farmed too. She was a hand in the field. They lived in a little log cabin, one room. They had a bed in there, a few chairs and a homemade table....

Read More

William M. Hannon

Sergeant, First Class, Q. M. C., Charlotte, N.C. Enlisted July 25, 1917, New Haven, Conn., 26th Division. Sailed for France September 9, 1917. Returned to States April 4, 1919. Discharged April 19, 1919. Served with 102nd Infantry and Division Headquarters, Q. M....

Read More

Ralph W. Hood

Was called into limited service in the medical department at Rock Hill, S. C., Sept. 4, 1918, and sent to Camp Greenleaf, Ga. On Sept. 24, 1918, he was dispatched with a body of men to duty at USA General Hospital No. 16, New Haven, Conn. Private Hood served three months at duty in the medical department and because of physical disability was placed in the hospital for three months for observation and treatment. On April 1, 1919, he was returned to duty and immediately attached to the Quartermaster Corps, and two months later he was promoted to Sergt. and made Finance Sergt. for that Army Post. He received his discharge Aug. 29, 1919, and was retained in a civilian capacity at that Hospital to close out the finance features of that post, the hospital having been taken over by the United States Public Health Service. Sergt. Hood arrived in Charlotte about the middle of November last, after having completed his work at the...

Read More

Miss Willie Ramsey Young

Daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A. M. Young, of Charlotte, N.C. Is a graduate of Elizabeth College, Charlotte, and of Smith, Northampton, Mass.; also of the National Training School, New York. She taught at Virginia College, Roanoke, Va., for two years, and was then elected one of the two Field Directors of the South Atlantic States for the Student Body of the Y. W. C. A. While filling this office the National Board of the Y. W. C. A. sent her to France as a war worker for the Red Cross nurses. Upon her arrival at Paris she was sent to Chaumont to take charge of the hut at the Compound over which General Pershing had charge. Her’s was a noble work, and a great compliment was paid her when, at a conference of the Board after the war was over, the Board said, “We could not have done without her.” Miss Young spent a year in France, and upon her return, after the war was over, resumed her work as Student Body Secretary of the Y. W. C. A., with headquarters at Richmond, Va., which position she still...

Read More

Monroe L. Robinson

Private. Enlisted April 15, 1917, 5th Co., C. A. C., Charlotte, N.C. Later transferred to 10th Anti-Aircraft Battery. Sailed for France July 8, 1918. Served in Argonne Forest and St. Mihiel drives. Returned to U. S. January 1, 1919. Discharged January 8, 1919. Home address, Charlotte,...

Read More

John Bethea Mallard

Entered service as 2nd Lieutenant in 323rd Infantry, on August 15, 1917. Transferred to 52nd Pioneer Infantry on January 24, 1918. Left the United States for service in France on August 3, 1918. In the Verdun sector from September 20th to September 22nd. In Malancourt-Vanguois sector from September 23rd to 25th. In Argonne-Meuse offensive from September 26th to November 11th, 1918. Returned to the U. S. April, 1919, and discharged April 13th. Was located in Charlotte, N.C., with Presbyterian Standard Publishing Co. as commercial artist until his death, Dec. 27, 1920. Author of “In the A. E. F. With an...

Read More

Guy R. Hinson

Sgt. Co. F, 105th Engineers; son of Mr. and Mrs. Z. A. Hinson, of Charlotte, N.C. Enlisted at Charlotte, N.C., May 7, 1917. Sailed for France May 27th, 1918. Appointed Sgt. 1st class, July 12, 1918. Was in all actions with his regiment and for conspicuous and meritorious bravery in action was awarded the American D. S. C., Nov. 20, 1918. On Nov. 22, 1919, in New York, was decorated by the Prince of Wales with the British Military Medal for the same act. The citation is as follows: For extraordinary heroism in action on August 27, 1918, Sgt. Hinson was in charge of a platoon, delivering a highly concentrated gas cloud attack against the enemy, when the cloud unexpectedly flared back. After leading the men to a place of safety, this soldier went back into the cloud four times at imminent peril to his own life, collecting and rescuing others who had been overcome. Conducting his platoon through heavy machine-gun fire, he put them in charge of another sergeant with instructions to resume their mission, while he again returned to search for gassed men and found all but two. His excellent leadership and unusual courage prevented many casualties and at the same time effected the completion of an important mission. Home address, Mrs. Della Hinson, 610 E. 7th St., Charlotte, N.C. He is now engaged with the Globe...

Read More

Hollie Clyde Giles

Entered service Y. M. C. A., Jan. 1, 1918. Sailed overseas Aug. 15, 1918. Arrived in France Sept. 2, 1918. Assigned to Motor Transport Duty, visiting various battle fronts and canteens in the interest of the soldiers. Some of the fronts he served at were Soissons, Rheims, Chateau Thierry, Toul Sector and others; the last duty performed was to drive a Packard Twin-Six, which belonged to Lt. Col. Goodrich, from Genoa, Italy to Paris, by the way of Monte Carlo and Nice, crossing the Alps Mountains; driving time thirty-one hours; one thousand seven hundred and fifteen kilometers. Landed in New York May 20, 1919. Mustered out May 21, 1919. Now holds responsible position with the Ford Motor Co., which he held before entering the service at Charlotte,...

Read More

John James Gifford

Enlisted in the United States Naval Reserve Force on June 6th, 1918, and called to active duty at Norfolk, Va., August 10th. Detailed as seaman, second class, on transport Pastores in September and after one trip to St. Nazaire, France, rated Yeoman, 3rd class. Promoted to Yeoman, 2nd class, and placed in charge of entertainment of troops on board. Discharged at Newport News, Va., after completing five trips to France. Mr. Gifford’s patriotic poems, written while in service, brought forth much favorable comment from government officials. His home is in...

Read More


Free Genealogy Archives

It takes a village to grow a family tree!
Genealogy Update - Keeping you up-to-date!
101 Best Websites 2016

Pin It on Pinterest