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Location: Carroll County NH

Atkinson Family Genealogy of Saco Valley

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now The Atkinsons were English, and the ancestors of the New England families came from Bury, in County Lancaster, in 1634. Theodore Atkinson, the emigrant, settled in Boston and was owner of a good estate there. Atkinson street, where he had land, was named for him, and Berry street, for the place of his nativity. Hon. Theodore Atkinson, a grandson, settled on Great island, in Portsmouth harbor, and engaged in trade and fishing. He was appointed clerk of the Superior Court of Judicature for the province; was a man of great fidelity, held in high esteem. John Atkinson, son of the first Theodore, b. in Boston in 1636, m. Sarah Myrick, Apr. 27, 1664, and lived on the side of the “Upper Green,” in Newburyport, Mass. His son, John Atkinson, m. Sarah Woodman, in 1693, and had Thomas, b. Mar. 16, 1694, who m. Mary Pike, of Salisbury, Aug. 5, 17 19. He was the father of: Humphrey Atkinson, b. June 12, 1720; m. Sarah Hale, of Newburyport, May 25, 1743, and lived in that town until 1760, when he came to Buxton. He had purchased land in the township previously; was a shipwright. He d. in 1775, and with his wife was buried at Pleasant Point. Children named as follows, being born in Newbury: Sarah Atkinson,...

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Biography of John W. Severance

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now John W. Severance, a prominent resident of Chichester, Merrimack County, and an ex-member of the New Hampshire legislature, was born February 3, 1822, in Sandwich, Carroll County, which was also the birthplace of his parents, Asa and Rhoda (Webster) Severance. His greatgrandfather, Ephraim Severance, was one of the pioneer farmers of that town, having gone there from Deerfield, N.H. John Severance, son of Ephraim and grandfather of the subject of this sketch, was a lifelong resident of Sandwich. He was an able farmer and possessed considerable mechanical ingenuity, which he applied to various kinds of handicraft. He took a leading part in public affairs as a supporter of the Whig party, and served as Tax Collector for sixteen consecutive years. He married Lydia Jewell, and had twelve children. The only survivor of the family is James M., who resides in Boston. His wife, Adeline Randall, died leaving four children-Eliza, Nancy, Alonzo, and Waldo. John Severance died at the age of seventy-three, but his wife lived to be eighty years old. They were members of the Methodist Episcopal church. Asa Severance, son of John and father of John W. Severance, was reared to agricultural pursuits; and when a young man he bought a farm adjoining the parental homestead. He displayed an ability which foreshadowed a successful future;...

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Biographical Sketch of H. Q. Sargent

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Sargent, H. Q.; merchant; born, Tampworth, N. H., Sept. 28, 1838; son of Joel and Hannah K. Boyd Sargent; studied in public school in Tampworth, and went to New Hampton Literary and Scientific Institute, graduating in 1858; poor health prevented a college course at Yale; married, Boston, Mass., June 28, 1860, Eliza E. S. Drew; issue, two daughters, Mabel, now Mrs. Alfred A. Guthrie, of Albany, N. Y., and Grace C., the wife of Rev. Arthur Dumper, of Norwalk, O., taught school for several years, and in 1862, entered the army as private in the 12th Regiment, N. H. Vol. Infantry; appointed 2nd lieut.; served till close of war in 1865; mustered out as senior capt., of regiment; in business in new Hampshire until 1869; in the Treasury Dept., at Washington, D. C., until 1870; came to Cleveland, and established the H. Q. Sargent Co.; in 1907, business incorporated as the Sargent Photo Supply & Mnfg, Co.; pres. of he Co.; school director, 1892 to 1900; interested in educational affairs; member Chamber of Commerce. Loyal Legion, Grand Army of the Republic, Mason, Knights of Pythias, Tippecanoe Club; member Trinity...

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Pequawket Tribe

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Pequawket Indians (a name of disputed etymology, the most probable rendering, according to Gerard, being ‘at the hole in the ground,’ from pekwakik). A tribe of the Abnaki confederacy, formerly living on the headwaters of Saco River and about Lovell’s Pond, in Carroll County, New Hampshire, and Oxford County, Maine. Their principal village, called Pequawket, was about the present Fryeburg, Maine. The tribe is famous for a battle fought in 1725 near the village, between about 50 English under Capt. Lovewell and 80 Indians, the entire force of the tribe, under their chief, Pangus. Both leaders were killed, together with 36 of the English and a large part of the Indian force. By this loss the Pequawket were so weakened that, together with the Arosaguntacook, they soon after withdrew to the sources of Connecticut River. After being there for a short while, the Arosaguntacook removed to St Francis in Canada, while the Pequawket remained on the Connecticut, where they were still living under their chief at the time of the Revolution. Some of them seem to have found their way back to their old home some time after the Lovewell fight. Pequawket Synonmy Pâgwâki. Kendall, Trav., III, 173, 1809 (correct form). Paquakig. Gyles (1726) in Me. Hist. Soc. Coll., III, 358, 1853. Peckwalket. Sullivan in N. H....

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Carroll County, New Hampshire Cemetery Records

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now New Hampshire Cemetery records are listed by county then name of cemetery within the New Hampshire county. Most of these are complete indices at the time of transcription, however, in some cases we list the listing when it is only a partial listing. Carroll County Following Cemeteries Hosted at Carroll County NHGenWeb Archives Freewill Baptist Church Cemetery Gowdy Family Cemetery Cotton Mountain Cemetery Following Cemeteries Hosted at Interment Simon Hill Road Cemetery Following Cemeteries Hosted at Lane Memorial Library Hampton Every Name Index Batchelder Cemetery Bride Hill Cemetery Elkins Cemetery Landing Cemetery Pine Grove Cemetery Ring Swamp Cemetery Sanborn Yard Shaw Cemetery “Ye Old Neighborhood” Cemetery Hampton Falls Veterans Interred in Hampton Falls North Hampton Center Cemetery Dearborn Family Cemetery Lamprey Family Cemetery Post Road Cemetery Veterans Interred in North Hampton Cemeteries Following Cemeteries Hosted at Lane Memorial Library Albany Cemetery Search Conway Conway Cemeteries Cemetery Search Eaton Cemetery Search Following Cemeteries Hosted at Carroll County, New Hampshire USGenWeb Beede Cemetery (West Sandwich) Bickford Family Plot (North Sandwich) Chicks Corner (West Sandwich) Stephen Fellows Cemetery (East Sandwich) George Cemetery (West Sandwich) Gilman/Hall Cemetery (Sandwich Notch) Nathaniel Fry Family Plot (East Sandwich) Mason Cemetery (North Sandwich)...

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Biographical Sketch of Dr. Horace P. Downs

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now DR. HORACE P. DOWNS. – Doctor Downs is one of those highly educated gentlemen who have deliberately chosen a new country in which to exercise abilities that are ever in demand in the older communities. He was born in Freedom, New Hampshire, in 1840. The family made a number of removals. It was at great Falls that he received his first comprehensive instructions; and at Exeter he pursued his academic course, and graduated from the medical department of Bowdoin College in 1865. Entering at once upon the practice of his profession, he chose a location at Tamworth, New Hampshire, and three years later secured a lucrative practice at Charlestown, which has since been incorporated with Boston, Massachusetts. In 1878 he determined to transfer his interests to the Pacific coast, and selected a home in that part of Whatcom county which has now been delimitated and named Skagit. In 1880 he was elected commissioner of the old county, and in the autumn of 1883 was appointed by the legislature as one of the three commissioners to segregate and organize the new county. At the special election following, he was chosen auditor, and by re-election still holds this office. He also served on the committee to make a settlement of affairs relating to the two counties. He is...

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Biography of Abel E. Eaton

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now ABEL E. EATON. – The extensive reputation and wide influence of Mr. Eaton bespeak for him a candid notice in any work touching upon the lives of our responsible men. The seventh son in a family of eleven children, he was born May 30, 1834, at Conway, New Hampshire. The father, Simeon Eaton, a lawyer from Maine, and the mother from the same state, whose maiden name was Bessie Paine, made their home upon a farm. During the first eight years of his life, the boy Abel found opportunity for but seven weeks’ schooling. This was his annual stipend of educational advantages until his eighteenth year, when he secured eleven weeks in the South Conway Seminary. Nevertheless, having an active New England brain, he eagerly imbibed ideas and information from all sources, utilizing the evening hours by the torchlights and fireplace to peruse books. At the age of twenty, he obtained the consent of his parents to go to Ohio, and in this then somewhat remote region experienced the many adventures, and tried the numerous shifts and turns of the youth away from home, realizing his greatest profit in a business way form a pair of calves purchased with money that he had hoarded as a boy from the proceeds of his bean patch. In 1854...

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Biographical Sketch of Jay F. Neal

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Jay F. Neal, dealer in groceries and provisions, Charleston; was born in Tuftonborough, Carroll Co., N. H., June 24, 1835; he is a son of Nathaniel Neal, a farmer of that town; his early life was passed in farm labor among the granite hills, but at the age of 19 years he went to Great Falls, and engaged in teaching just across the river in New Berwick Me.; he continued teaching during a portion of the year for twelve years. He graduated at the New Hampshire Conference Seminary at Tilton, N. H., in 1859, and entered the Sophomore class of the Wesleyan University in Middletown, Conn. At the end of a year, however, his health becoming impaired, and an opportunity presenting itself to engage in teaching in the South, he left college, and, going to Bourbon Co., Ky., taught in the Millersburg high school until 1861. He then came to Charleston and taught two years in the public schools, after which he engaged in clerking for Henry Weiss in the hardware business, and afterward as bookkeeper for the Charleston Woolen-Mill, engaging in his present business in 1870. He was married by the Rev. W. B. Anderson on the 25th of March, 1863, to Miss Sarah E. Blakeman, of Charleston Tp., a daughter of Even Blakeman, now...

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Biography of Hon. H. A. Neal

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Hon. H. A. Neal, attorney at law, Charleston; is a native of’ New Hampshire; he was born in Tuftonborough, Carroll Co., Dec. 13, 1846; he was raised on a farm until he was ten years of age, and then his parents removed to Great Falls, N. H.; he attended the public schools of that city until 1863, when the family returned to the farm; in the fall of 1864, he entered the army as a member of Co. K, 18t N. H. Heavy Artillery, and served till the close of the war; on his return, he attended one term in the Academy at Effingham, N. H., and the following winter taught a country school; in the spring of 1866, he went to Poughkeepsie, N. Y., and pursued a commercial course of study in Eastman’s Business College, where he graduated in September following; he at once came West, and engaged in teaching in Coles Co.; the next year, he became Principal of the Grammar School in. Paris, and, in 1868, went to Watseka, Iroquois Co., Ill., where he had charge of the public schools for three years; the winters of 1871 and 1872, he spent in the law department of the University of Michigan, at Ann Arbor, reading during vacations in the office of Wiley & Parker,...

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