Location: Buchanan County MO

Biography of George W. Buck

GEORGE W. BUCK. – The subject of this article is at the head of one of the largest industrial institutions of the county of Union, being proprietor and manager of the large sawmilling and lumbering establishment, where he has been enabled to turn out from three to four million feet of fine lumber annually, and in this capacity he has displayed an excellent ability and enterprise which have commended him to the esteem and confidence of the entire community, while he has also manifested a stanch character and maintained an untarnished reputation. George W. was born on March 22, 1848, in Hancock county, Illinois to Roger and Maria (Smith) Buck, natives of Virginia. The father was a farmer in Illinois, having come thither when Chicago was a stockade and he remained in Hancock county until his death, in 1853, and his remains are buried at Quincy, Illinois. In 1880, the mother died and beside her life’s companion she also sleeps. In the spring of 1864, although but a lad our subject enlisted for one hundred days in the One Hundred and Thirty-seventh Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and he was stationed to guard Memphis. After being mustered out in the fall of the same year, he went with his mother and sister to Clinton county, Missouri, and engaged in raising and selling the Osage orange hedge tree, where he was employed...

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Biography of Homer C. Bidwell

HOMER C. BIDWELL. – The well known and enterprising businessman, of whom we now have the pleasure of speaking is one of the substantial citizens of Union, & has by dint of hard effort, wise management and considerate treatment of patrons built up a fine business in the livery and transportation line. Having as fine stables and his rigs are among the most comfortable and well kept to be secured anywhere. Homer C. was born in Galesburg, Wisconsin on January 25, 1871, being the son of Charles C. & Mary A. (Gilbert) Bidwell. The father was one of those brave men who hazarded their lives in the defense of the Union and during the entire war he served participating in many skirmishes as well as heavy battles, among which may be mentioned those adjacent to Chattanooga. At the close of the war he was honorably discharged and settled down to industrial life. While our subject was a child the family removed to Virginia, whence they went to the vicinity of St. Joseph, Missouri, and from there to Orleans, Nebraska, during a portion of which time Homer was occupied with his father in the livery business. In 1884 they migrated to Union county and after some time our subject entered upon an apprenticeship to the miller’s trade, which he learned and followed for five years. After this period he took...

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Biography of James M. Parker

JAMES M. PARKER. – There is no more worthy subject for the pen of the writer than the sturdy, faithful pioneer. Little will ever be said concerning that life compared with the amount that might really be mentioned in praise of this noble class of individuals. We are pleased to announce that the man whose name appears at the head of this article belonged to that number of praiseworthy men who opened this country, doing work here before the middle of the last century, and from that time until the present maintaining an upright demeanor, displaying good ability to properly fill the stations of life where he has wrought, and constantly laboring for the development of the country and for the welfare of all, while his priceless qualities of moral worth and intrinsic value have been a light to many on the pilgrim road. James M. Parker was born in Surry county, North Carolina, on September 20, 1826, being the son of John Parker, a noted farmer of that region, and a prominent citizen of his state. There our subject was educated and at the tender age of fourteen years his adventurous spirit led him to begin the journey to the west, landing in Buchanan county, Missouri, in that year. He at once set to work for wages and six eyars were spent in steady employment in that county....

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Biographical Sketch of Samuel Rockwell

Rockwell, Samuel; civil engineer; born, Brooklyn, N. Y., Feb. 20, 1847; son of William and Susan Lawrence Prince Rockwell; educated, Yale College and Sheffield Scientific School, 1873; Ph. B.; married, St. Joseph, Mo., June 7, 1881, Cordelia Ann Geiger; issue, four sons and one daughter; business career, 1873-1877, resident engineer D. L. & W. R. R., Hoboken, N. J.; built tunnel through Bergen Hill and other changes of line and separation of grade work; 1877-1881, contractor; 1881-1882, asst. city engineer, Kansas City, Mo.; 1882-1884, principal asst. engineer, St. Paul Water Works; 1884-1887, locating and constructing engineer, St. Paul & M. & M. R. R.; 1887-1890, chief engineer, Eastern Minnesota By. Co.; 1890, chief engineer, extension of A. T. & S. F. R. R. to San Francisco; 1891, chief engineer, Duluth & Winnipeg R. R.; 1891-1899, engineer M. S. Division, L. S. & M. S. R. R., at Toledo; 1899-1904, principal asst. engineer, L. S. & M. S. R. R. at Cleveland; 1904-1905, asst. chief engineer, L. S. & M. S. R. R. Co.; 1905-1913, consulting engineer, L. S. & M. S. R. R., Cleveland, O.; member American Society of Civil Engineers, and American Railway Engineering Ass’n; Mason; member Athletic and Mayfield Clubs. Recreations: Hunting and...

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Biography of Wilfrid Cavaness

Wilfrid Cavaness, who had been a Kansas newspaper man for over twenty years, was born at Chetopa November 24, 1875. He attended the public schools there, graduating from high school in 1892, and for two years was a student in Baker University. In 1895 he became connected with the Chetopa Advance under his father, and remained there until 1899. For the following two years he was with the Columbus Courier, and in 1901 came to Chanute and is now treasurer and manager of the Chanute Tribune. The Chanute Tribune was established April 8, 1892, by George M. Dewey. It had always been published as a republican paper, and is now both a daily and weekly and had a large circulation and influence over Neosho and surrounding counties. The officers of the Tribune Company are: Herbert Cavaness, president; Wilfrid Cavaness, treasurer and manager; George L. Barcus, vice president; and Fletcher Maclary secretary. The Tribune plant is thoroughly equipped with all the modern machinery for printing and typesetting, and it is a very successful newspaper. The plant and offices are located at 14 North Lincoln Avenue, and Cavaness Brothers own the building. Wilfrid Cavaness is a republican, is affiliated with Cedar Lodge No. 103, Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons, Cedar Chapter No. 21, Royal Arch Masons, Cedar Commandery No. 44, Knights Templar, Mirza Temple of the Mystic Shrine at Pittsburg, Fort...

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Biography of Fred C. Gardner

Fred C. Gardner, a Kansas educator of wide experience and exceptional qualifications, is now superintendent of the city schools of Howard, Kansas. Though a native of Missouri he had spent most of his life in Kansas and is a product of Kansas institutions of higher learning. He was born at DeKalb in Buchanan County, Missouri, August 25, 1888, and as he is still a young man much may be expected of him from the work that he had already accomplished. He represents a branch of the Gardner family that was established in Kentucky during the pioneer days and is of Scotch-Irish ancestry. His great-grandfather, John Gardner spent all his life as a farmer in Kentucky. Professor Gardner’s grandfather, Isom Gardner was born in Kentucky in 1814, and died in Buchanan County, Missouri, in 1890. He was one of the very early settlers in Northwestern Missouri, locating on a farm not far from St. Joseph and paying $10 an acre for land that is now worth many times that price. He married Mary Therman, who was born in 1817 and died in Buchanan County, Missouri, 1903. A record of their children is briefly as follows: James, deceased, who spent most of his years as a farmer and merchant at Carthage, Missouri; Elizabeth, who died at Kansas City, Missouri, married James Hillix, deceased, who was a farmer and later a carpenter;...

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Biography of Fred C. Hall

One of the alert and enterprising business men of Nowata is Fred C. Hall, secretary and manager of the Henderson Gasoline Company, with offices in the First National Bank building. He was born in Galt, Illinois, on the 15th of October, 1883. His father, William Boyd Hall, was a native of New York and removed to Illinois at an early day, where he followed farming. His death occurred in 1885. William B. Hall married Miss Alice Buck, a native of Illinois. Her death occurred in Nowata in 1919. In the acquirement of an education Fred C. Hall attended the schools of St. Joseph, Missouri, until he completed the eighth grade, after which he went to work, furthering his education by attending night school. In that way he contributed to the support of his mother, while he was getting an education, and in 1894 he went with her to Coffeyville, Kansas. At that place he conducted a shop where he sold all Kansas City papers and he likewise operated pop corn wagons, achieving substantial success in both connections. In 1900 he entered railroad service, becoming an employee in the clerical department of the Missouri Pacific road, and his conscientious performance of every duty assigned him won him constant promotion from one position to another, until he had been active in every position from yard clerk to chief clerk in both...

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Biography of John Caleb Storr

John Caleb Storr, a native son of Oklahoma and a member of one of the oldest families of the state, has resided in Vinita for the past twenty-three years and has become well known as an attorney, farmer, stock raiser and oil operator, being a man of versatile talents whose efforts are resultant factors in whatever he undertakes. He was born in the Flint district of the Cherokee Nation, near Stilwell, Indian Territory, October 15, 1870, and his parents were James and Emma Jane (Rider) Storr, the former born in Tennessee in 1832, while the latter was a native of the Cherokee Nation. In 1837 the father accompanied his parents on their removal to Indian Territory, settlement being made in the Cherokee Nation, and from 1878 until his demise James Storr followed the occupation of farming in Delaware County. He was very successful in his agricultural operations, accumulating large holdings in land, and he also devoted a large part of his attention to the breeding of fine driving horses. He was one of the leading men of his community and passed. away at Grove, Delaware County, in 1901, in the faith of the Catholic Church. The mother survives and is still a resident of Grove. After completing the work of the grammar and high schools John C. Storr entered the Tahlequah Male Seminary, from which he was graduated in...

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Biography of Mansfield M. Sturgeon

One of the most brilliant and astute attorneys practising at the Rock Island County Bar is Mansfield M. Sturgeon, senior member of the legal firm of Sturgeon. Stelck & Sturgeon, a man whose great ability and profound learning as an attorney has been demonstrated in the trial of many important suits, as well as in sound counsel and legal advice. He was born September 10, 1843, at Letart Falls, Ohio, his parents, being Oliver Hazard Perry Sturgeon and Mary Ellenor (Summers) Sturgeon. The father was born March 14, 1818, at Sistersville, Virginia, the date of the marriage of the senior Mr. and Mrs. Sturgeon being December 25, 1839. The death of the father occurred at Windom, Kansas, in 1902, he being then in his eighty-fifth year. The mother was born in Morgantown, Virginia, June 11., 1819. She is still living, and is in her eighty-eighth year. The grandfather of our subject, William Sturgeon, was a soldier in the war of 1812, and was with the land forces at Lake Erie when Commodore Perry won the memorable naval battle there. Hence when his son was born he bestowed upon him the somewhat lengthy name of Oliver Hazard Perry Sturgeon, in honor of his hero. This rather cumbrous cognomen was abbreviated by his boyhood companions to simply “Perry “, and by this name he was known throughout his life. The Sturgeons...

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Biography of Hon. Charles Miner Bradshaw

HON. CHARLES MINER BRADSHAW. – The present efficient collector of customs of the Puget Sound district, a portrait of whom appears in this work, is a gentleman who has worked his way from the lowest rung of the ladder until he now stands at the front rank in his chosen profession, as well as having acquired a recognized position among the men who lead public opinion and form institutions and states. Mr. Bradshaw was born in Bridgewater, Susquehanna county, Pennsylvania, August 9, 1831, – the son of Salmon and Sarah F. Schurz Bradshaw, and is a lineal descendant of John Bradshaw, who presided at court at the time of the trial of Charles I. when that usurping king was executed by Oliver Cromwell; and now, as relics of great interest, he has in his home some of the effects of the old regicide. Mr. Bradshaw resided in his birthplace until 1839, when his parents removed to Dryden, Tompkins county, New York, where he was educated at the Dryden High School. On the completion of his school life in 1852, the ambitious young man started west, coming to St. Joseph, Missouri. He then fitted out, with another of his own age, an ox-team, and crossed the plains to Oregon, making the journey hither in the year 1852, when the pestilence of cholera, often joined with famine, was abroad. The thousands...

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Biography of Solomon Emerick

SOLOMON EMERICK, – Some time before Horace Greeley gave his advice, “Go West, young man, go West,” there were hardy young Americans making tracks across the Rocky Mountains, and pushing into the fastnesses towards the pacific Ocean. “Ribs of brass and hearts of steel” had these young fellows; and they were without fear or even caution. One of these was Solomon Emerick, who was born in Ohio in 1820. He moved to Buchanan county, Missouri, in 1830, and in 1843 was on the way to the rendezvous on the border. Falling in with the pioneer Gilmore, he accepted of him an outfit and took the job of driving oxen to Oregon, writing to his father that he was going to the pacific coast with Burnett’s expedition, as the emigration of 1843 was frequently called. When the one hundred and twenty-five wagons and loose stock were well under way, a division was made to accommodate all the hands; and Emerick was in the company that was under Captain Martin, with Gilmore, James Hayes, T. Reeves and others. Upon their arrival, after the arduous trip fully described elsewhere, at Walla Walla, they disposed of their oxen to McKinley at the fort, taking an order for an equal number in the Willamette valley from the Hudson’s Bay Company, and, embarking in canoes, completed their journey by the swift waters of the Columbia....

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Biographical Sketch of William Pentland

WILLIAM PENTLAND. – This town-builder and founder of Lexington was born December 26, 1825, in Fleming county, Kentucky, and removed with his parents in 1831 to Platt county, Missouri, and three years later made a new location in Buchanan county. He was there engaged in agriculture. In 1847 he made the great journey with ox-teams across the plains to Oregon, and located near the present site of Corvallis. He remained with his people in that neighborhood until 1867, receiving a good, practical education during his early days at the common schools of Corvallis. he was married in 1860 to Miss Jane Nordyke, and afterwards engaged successfully in farming and stock-raising in Benton county. In 1867 he came to Willow Creek, in Eastern Oregon, and has been identified with the stock interests of that section ever since. He has become the owner of an immense flock of sheep, having twenty thousand head, owning also a small band of horses. For the sustenance of this truly patriarchal flock, he owns fourteen thousand acres of land. In 1885 he laid out the townsite of Lexington, Oregon, and is therefore the father of that most vigorous, active prosperous and moral young city. The large agricultural section and immense grazing region tributary to that town is sufficient guarantee of its future prosperity. It is now supplied with a gristmill of a capacity of fifty...

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