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Location: Brunswick Maine

Jackson Family of Fall River, MA

Here in this article it is the purpose to treat of but one branch or family of the Massachusetts Jacksons – the family of John Jackson, who was a descendant of the Middleboro settler of the name, one John Jackson, and who in time removed to the State of Maine, the home State for several generations of the Fall River Jacksons in question. The first John Jackson came from England to New England and settled in Middleboro, where in May, 1714, he was married to Mary Smith. They had two children (if not more), John and Cornelius, the latter of whom was born in Middleboro Sept. 11, 1716. The father died in 1731.

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John Gyles Captivity Narrative – Indian Captivities

John Gyles captivity narrative provides a stunning display of Abenaki culture and lifestyle, as it was in the 1690’s. John was 10 years old when he was taken captive in the attack on Pemaquid (Bristol Maine) and his narrative provides an accounting of his harrowing treatment by his Indian captors, as well as the three years exile with his French owners at Jemseg New Bruswick. His faith in Christ remains central in the well-being of his mind throughout his ordeal.

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Biography of Chancey Adams, M.D.

Chancey Adams, M.D., a successful medical practitioner of Concord, was born in North New Portland, Me., March 15, 1861, son of Benjamin and Eliza Briton (Sawyer) Adams. He belongs to a branch of the famous old Massachusetts family of the same name. Henry Adams, the founder of the Massachusetts family, was an English emigrant, who came over to this country in the year 1630, with his eight sons, and settled in Braintree, in the Colony of Massachusetts. Of these eight sons, one subsequently returned to England. The names of the others, according to the records of Massachusetts, were: Peter, Henry, Thomas, Edward, Jonathan, Samuel, and Joseph. Samuel was the father of two sons, one of whom was Joseph Adams, who lived in North Chelmsford, Mass. Joseph was the father of Benjamin Adams, who was the father of William Adams, who was the father of Solomon Adams, who was the great-grand-father of Dr. Adams. Solomon Adams migrated from North Chelmsford, Mass., his native town, to Farmington, Me., at the close of the Revolutionary War. The record shows that he had served his country during that war from May 15, 1777, to May 15, 1780, in Captain James Varnum’s company, of Colonel Michael Jackson’s regiment; but his active military service actually extended beyond these dates. William Adams, son of Solomon and grandfather of Dr. Adams, was a native of Farmington, Me....

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Biographical Sketch of Allen, William

Allen, William, son of William Allen, was born at Brunswick, Cumberland County, Maine, March 31, 1822. He is a grandson of the Rev. Thomas Allen, the “fighting parson” of the noted Berkshire militia, who performed such conspicuous service under General Stark of Revolutionary fame. His father was a clergyman of Pittsfield, a scholar of eminence, and at one time president of Bowdoin College. After obtaining his preliminary education at the public schools, Mr. Allen fitted for college at Phillips Academy, Andover, and at the North Yarmouth Academy, in Maine, and entered Bowdoin College in 1834. After a few months spent at Bowdoin he went to Amherst, where he graduated in 1842. He began the study of law at the Yale law school, continuing it later at Northampton, where he was admitted to the bar in 1845, and where he has since resided. In 1880 Mr. Allen was made associate justice of the superior court, which high office he now holds, abundantly justifying the judicious selection of Governor Long, to whom he was indebted for the...

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Biographical Sketch of Allen, Horace G.

Allen, Horace G., son of Stephen M. Allen, was born at Jamaica Plain (Boston), July 27, 1855. His preparatory studies were pursued in the common schools. He was graduated L.L.B. from the Harvard law school in 1876; then became associated with Nathan Morse, Boston. He was admitted to the Suffolk bar in 1877. Later, he became law partner with Mr. Morse, under the firm name of Morse & Allen, with whom he still remains in practice of the law. Mr. Allen was married in Brunswick, Me, April 28, 1881, to Grace D., daughter of Gen. Joshua L. Chamberlain. Mr. Allen is a member of the Boston Art Club, Boston Athletic Association, and Curtis Club. In 1888 and ’89 he was elected a member of the Boston common council, and in the latter year, after a protracted contest, was chosen president of that body, January 11th. In this responsible position he has displayed marked ability, and has already acquired a reputation for tact and fairness greatly to his credit. His residence is in...

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Biography of William E. Leighton, M.D.

Dr. William E. Leighton, who is devoting his time to the practice of surgery in St. Louis, was born in Portland, Maine, May 9, 1892, a son of the late George W. Leighton, who was a descendant of an old Massachusetts family which was founded in Cohasset in the early part of the seventeenth century by one of the name who came from England. One of the ancestral lines is traced back to the Packard family of Boston. Later descendants participated in the Revolutionary war. George W. Leighton, the Doctor’s father, was in the granite business and during the Civil war was employed by the government in the lighthouse department on construction work. At one time he served as alderman of Portland and at all times was a stanch supporter of republican principles. He was also a thirty-second degree Mason and ever loyally followed the teachings and purposes of the craft. He married Alexina Drinkwater, a native of Maine, whose family originally came from Aberdeen, Scotland, the ancestral line being traced back to the early part of the sixteenth century. One of the name was knighted by an English king. To Mr. and Mrs. George W. Leighton were born four children, three daughters and a son, the latter being second in order of birth. The father departed this life in 1900, at the age of sixty years. The mother...

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Biographical Sketch of Seth Eastman

Seth Eastman, born in Brunswick, Maine, January 24, 1808; died in Washington, D. C., August 31, 1875. Was appointed to the Military Academy, West Point, at the age of 16, and was graduated June, 1829. Served at Fort Crawford and Fort Snelling, where he had ample opportunities for studying the Indians who frequented the posts. In November, 1831, he was detailed for duty at the Academy and retired from active service December, 1863. From 1850 to 1855 he was engaged in the preparation of the illustrations used in the work mentioned above, evidently under the supervision of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs. View Dakotah Village, Dakotah...

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Biography of C. B. Mitchell

Although one of the more recent additions to the Miami bar, Charles B. Mitchell has already demonstrated his ability to cope with the intricacies of the law and is building up a good practice. He is also well known as a writer of ability and has contributed many interesting articles to leading magazines. He was born at Brunswick, Maine, on the 9th of October, 1870, his parents being George E. and Agnes E. Mitchell, also natives of the Pine Tree state, the former born at Brunswick, August 3, 1850, while the birth of the latter occurred at Oldtown in 1854. The father was employed in various shoe factories in Maine and is now living at Lewiston; that state, but the mother passed away in 1890. C. B. Mitchell was accorded limited educational opportunities, attending the public schools of his native city to the age of eighteen years, and working part time in a shoe factory from the age of twelve years. For a time after leaving school he was a reporter on the Lewiston (Me.) Gazette and then read law in the office of Hon. J. W. Mitchell at Auburn, that state, being admitted to practice in 1892. Three years later he became private secretary to James F. McElroy, of Albany, New York, a construction engineer with a national reputation in 1899 he entered Princeton (N. J.) Theological Seminary...

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Biographical Sketch of Dr. Horace P. Downs

DR. HORACE P. DOWNS. – Doctor Downs is one of those highly educated gentlemen who have deliberately chosen a new country in which to exercise abilities that are ever in demand in the older communities. He was born in Freedom, New Hampshire, in 1840. The family made a number of removals. It was at great Falls that he received his first comprehensive instructions; and at Exeter he pursued his academic course, and graduated from the medical department of Bowdoin College in 1865. Entering at once upon the practice of his profession, he chose a location at Tamworth, New Hampshire, and three years later secured a lucrative practice at Charlestown, which has since been incorporated with Boston, Massachusetts. In 1878 he determined to transfer his interests to the Pacific coast, and selected a home in that part of Whatcom county which has now been delimitated and named Skagit. In 1880 he was elected commissioner of the old county, and in the autumn of 1883 was appointed by the legislature as one of the three commissioners to segregate and organize the new county. At the special election following, he was chosen auditor, and by re-election still holds this office. He also served on the committee to make a settlement of affairs relating to the two counties. He is a Republican in politics. In business relations Doctor Downs has been prosperous, and...

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Biography of Hon. L. F. Grover

HON. L.F. GROVER. – Governor La Fayette Grover was born in Bethel, Maine, November 29, 1823, of ancestry on both sides distinguished in the early and late history of Massachusetts. He is a brother of Major Abernethy Grover, a man of distinction in the politics of Maine and in the war of the Rebellion; of Professor Talleyrand Grover, an eminent classist; and of General Cuvier Grover, a skillful commander in the war of the Rebellion. He was educated at the Classical Academy of Bethel, and at Bowdoin College, Maine. He studied law in Philadelphia under the instruction of the late Asa I. Fish, and was admitted to the bar there in March, 1850. Late in the autumn of that year, he took passage on a merchant vessel bound round Cape Horn to San Francisco, where he arrived in July, 1851, and in the next month reached Portland by the old steamer Columbia. He at once proceeded to Salem, where he established himself as a layer. The first regular term of the United States district court was held at Salem in the following month; and on the invitation of Chief Justice Nelson, who presided over the court, Mr. Grover became the clerk, stipulating that he would accept the position temporarily, and until a suitable successor could be appointed. He held the office six months, obtaining an excellent acquaintance with local...

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