Location: Bristol County MA

Biography of Allen, Nathaniel Topliff

Allen, Nathaniel Topliff, son of Ellis and Lucy (Lane) Allen, was born in Medfield, Norfolk County, Sept. 29, 1823. His native homestead farm has been owned and tilled by seven generations of Allens, noted for longevity, sterling common-sense, and rugged worth; and there, during his boyhood, the subject of this sketch followed the pursuits of his ancestors, and laid the foundation of a vigorous constitution. Three years of his minority were spent in a Waltham cotton mill, where he acquired a knowledge of textile manufacture; he also received a good common-school education in the public schools, a family school kept by Rev. Joseph Allen at Northborough, and Northfield Academy. Having chosen to become a teacher, he continued his studies in the Bridgewater state normal school, and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute at Troy, N. Y. He afterwards taught in the various public schools of Mansfield, Northborough, Northfield and Shrewsbury, until the spring of 1848, when he was appointed by Horace Mann, of the state board of education, to take charge of the model department of the normal school at West Newton. This position he filled with marked ability for nearly six years, when he established in connection with Rev. Cyrus Pierce, father of American normal schools, the institution of which he is now principal—the West Newton English and classical school. Mr. Allen has been one of the most progressive and successful...

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Biographical Sketch of Ames, Oliver

Ames, Oliver, son of Oakes and Eveline (Gilmore) Ames, was born in Easton, Bristol County, February 4, 1831. He passed the usual public school course of his native town, and prepared for college in the academies at No. Attleborough and Leicester. His college course—a special one – was taken at Brown University, Providence, R. I. He began business life as an employee in the shovel works of Oliver Ames & Sons. He afterwards went on the road as traveling agent for the firm, of which he soon became an active partner. While engaged in the never-ceasing round of cares that are incident to the carrying on of immense manufacturing establishments, Olive Ames has always found time in which to serve his fellow-citizens in public matters, whether state, county, municipal or social. He has been twelve years a member of the Easton school board; two years in the state Senate (1880 and ’81); four years lieutenant-governor (1883 to ’86), and governor of the Commonwealth three years, 1887, ’88, and ’89. Governor Ames has served in the Massachusetts volunteer militia as 2d lieutenant, adjutant, major and lieutenant colonel. He has been for many years president and director of various railroad, manufacturing and mining corporations and banking institutions. He is actively connected with a number of benevolent societies and has a membership in many social and political clubs. Governor Ames was married...

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Biographical Sketch of Aldrich, James Mott

Aldrich, James Mott, son of Arnold and Dollee Lang Aldrich, was born in Smithfield, Providence County, R. I., October 30, 1817. He attended the common schools and the academy at Union Village. He studied medicine in the office of Dr. J. A. Brown, Providence, R. I., Harvard medical school, and in the Botanic Medical College, Cincinnati, Ohio; and commenced regular practice in Fall River in 1843, in which city he has ever since lived. Dr. Aldrich was married in Dedham, May 24, 1844, to Mary A. Allen, who died in 1857. He was again married, September 23, 1862, to Louisa G., the daughter of Hon. Nathaniel B. and Sarah (Gray) Borden, of Fall River. They have two children; Mary L. and Nathaniel B. Aldrich. From 1846 to ’47 he was editor of the “Medical Enquirer.” He has been for many years president of the Children’s Home; was a member of the school board fifteen years; and is president of the Barnard Manufacturing Company. Dr. Aldrich was a strong abolitionist, and has been a life-long advocate of total abstinence from all intoxicants; was a member of the Society of Friends, but left them when their New England yearly meeting forbade the opening of their meeting-houses for anti-slavery gatherings. He has been connected with the Unitarian society since...

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Biographical Sketch of Allen, Frederick Slocum

Allen, Frederick Slocum, son of Holden and Mary Devoll (Slocum) Allen, was born in Westport, Bristol County, December 25, 1837. His early educational advantages were limited to the district schools of Fairhaven. Before he was quite seventeen years of age, he shipped on a whaling voyage to the Arctic Ocean, and sailed from New Bedford, November 3, 1856, in the ship “Saratoga”–Frederick Slocum, master. He was connected with the whaling business some three years and a half. This business he left in 1860. As his father held a commission as pilot for the ports of Buzzard’s Bay, he then assisted him in that business as boat-keeper for about ten years, as also previous to his whaling voyage, some five years. He then spent considerable time and money in improving windlasses. Several models were on exhibition at the National Museum at Washington. For several years he has been quite actively engaged in town affairs, and for fourteen years he has held a commission as justice of the peace. He has given special attention to the saving of life from shipwreck, and in 1887, at the International Maritime Exposition at Havre, France, he was awarded a silver medal for a reversible lifeboat. Mr. Allen was married in Martha’s Vineyard, November 1860, to Florencia C. Austin. They have one son; Frederick Allen. His residence is Cuttyhunk Island, Dukes...

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Biographical Sketch of Ames, Frank M.

Ames, Frank M., son of Oakes and Eveline (Gilmore) Ames, was born in North Easton, Bristol County, August 14, 1833. He was educated at Leicester and Andover academies. Upon leaving school he entered into the employ of the well-known firm of Oliver Ames & Sons, where he remained several years, and became practically acquainted not only with the mechanical part of manufacturing shovels, but also with the details of an extensive business. In 1858 he removed to Canton to take control of the business of the Kinsley Iron & Machine Company. At the present time he is one of the chief owners in the corporation. He is also president of the Lamson Consolidated Store Service Company. He has, in addition to the other business, been largely interested in railroads, and was for several years sole trustee and manager of the New Orleans, Mobile & Texas Railroad. He also owns and manages a large plantation of about twelve thousand acres, on the Mississippi River, directly opposite the city of New Orleans, where he has each year from thirteen hundred to fifteen hundred acres of land cultivated with sugar-cane, and a large area with rice, while the remaining portion is used for grazing purposes. He has been active in public life. He was sergeant major and quartermaster of the 2d battalion infantry, which afterwards became the 4th regiment, of which he...

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Biography of Capt. Isaac Barker

Capt. Isaac Barker, came from New Bedford, Massachusetts, to the northwestern territory in the autumn of 1788. For several years he lived in the Belpre settlement on the Ohio river, about fifteen miles from Marietta, and his name is preserved as one of the heads of families who, in the year 1792, took refuge in the block house called “Farmers’ Castle,” where he and his family remained till the violence of the Indian war was spent. In 1798 he removed with his family of five sons and three daughters to Athens township, and settled near the village of Athens, where he passed the remainder of his life. Capt. Barker was a sea-faring man in early life, being supercargo and captain of an East India vessel, and, during the revolutionary war, took an active part in the privateering service. His sons were Michael, Isaac, Joseph, William, and Timothy. Michael Barker, son of Capt. Isaac Barker, born in 1776 at New Bedford, Massachusetts, came with his father’s family to Marietta in the autumn of 1788. During the Indian war, from 1792 to 1795 while they lived in Farmers’ Castle at Belpre, Michael served as a scout or spy against the Indians in a company raised under the authority of the Ohio Company. He came to Athens county and settled near the town of Athens in April, 1798, where he spent the...

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Biography of Judge E. F. Howcroft

JUDGE E. F. HOWCROFT. Not without justice, Judge E. F. Howcroft is conceded to hold an enviable position among the prominent and successful men of Christian County, for he has not only rendered it valuable service as a reliable public official, but as an industrious farmer and law-abiding citizen. He is a native of the Old Bay State, born at Fall River, November 18, 1838, to the marriage of David and Ruth (Bindley) Howcroft, and like other British-American citizens, has done good stalwart work in the cultivation and development of this section. His father, David Howcroft, who for many years was a seaman on a whaling vessel, was born in England and came to this country with his father, John Howcroft, who settled in Massachusetts. After growing to mature years, the father of our subject moved to Dover, N. H., and there lived for many years. He was a Republican in politics. Mrs. Howcroft died in 1838, when our subject was only six months old. The latter was the younger of two children. Sarah, the other child, is now residing in Massachusetts, the wife of Andrew Waldren. Until about sixteen years of age, our subject remained in his native State. He then went to Penobscot County, Me., where he remained until twenty-four years of age, and then returned to Massachusetts, where he remained until 1876. He married, in Maine,...

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Biographical Sketch of Charles B. Murray

Murray, Charles B.; chemist and metallurgist; born, Worcester, Massachusetts, April 6, 1866; son of Peleg F. and Mary Prince Murray; educated, common schools at Worcester; took B. S. degree at Polytechnic Institute, at Worcester, Mass., in 1887; married, Attleboro, Mass., Jan. 29, 1890; Ellen Lincoln Robinson; issue, two children, Philip F., and Mildred A.; after leaving school, asst. chemist at Joliett Steel Co., Joliet, Illinois; spent a year in Buena Vista, Virginia, as chemist, and a year with the Minnesota Iron Co.; January, 1893, was appointed chief chemist and metallurgist at the Eliza Johnson Works, of the Carnegie Steel Co.; remained with this company until 1904; then started a commercial laboratory in Pittsburgh; in March, 1907, sold out and came to Cleveland, forming partnership with Benedick Crowell, as Crowell & Murray, chemists, metallurgists and mining engineers; member National Geographic Society, Engineers Society, Western Penn., American Institute of Mining Engineers, American Chemical Society, and Society of Chemical Industry; member Emmanuel Lodge, No. 605, F. & A. M., Cleveland Chapter, No. 148, R. A. M.; member Athletic and Tennis Clubs. Recreations: Tennis, Squash and...

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Biographical Sketch of Samuel D. Latty

Latty, Samuel D.; sec’y and gen. mgr. The Kirk-Latty Mnfg. Co.; born, Boston, Mass., Sept. 12, 1864; educated in the public schools; began career in the tack business with A. Fields & Son, Taunton, Mass., 1881-1883; Tack Dept., Cincinnati, O., 1883-1885; came to Cleveland and worked for the W. Bingham Co., 1885-1887; took charge of the Sales Dept. of the National Screw & Tack Co., 1887-1895; one of the organizers of the Kirk-Latty Mnfg. Co., and when the Company was incorporated, was elected sec’y and gen. mgr.; still serving; pres. the Buckeye Box Co., and interested in other corporations; member Chamber of Commerce, Century, Euclid, and Bedford Glens Country Clubs;...

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Leonard Enos Todd of Oakville CT

Leonard Enos Todd9, (Dwight E.8, Leonard7, Ely6, Jonah5, Stephen4, Samuel3, Samuel2, Christopher1) born May 10, 1880, in Woodbridge, New Haven County, Conn., baptised Nov. 24, 1881, in Christ Church Parish, Bethany, Conn., married May 24, 1917, Grace Lavinia Ingraham, in Christ Church, Bethany, the same Parish Church where he had been baptised, confirmed and ordained. He received his early education in the district schools of Woodbridge. Prepared for college at Hopkins Grammar School, New Haven, Conn., from which he graduated in 1900. Graduated from Yale in 1906. Entered Berkeley Divinity School, Middletown, Conn., in the Fall of 1906 and graduated in 1909. Was ordained Deacon in the Episcopal Church by Bishop Brewster, June 2, 1909, in the Church of the Holy Trinity, Middletown, Conn. Was ordained Priest in Christ Church, Bethany, Conn., by Bishop Brewster, of Conn., Sept. 19, 1910. From Aug. 1, 1909 to Aug. 1, 1911 he was Curate in church of the ascension, Fall River, Mass. On Sept. 15, 1911 he took up the work in Oakville, Conn., at that time being a mission under St. Johns Church, Waterbury, Conn. After having been there for a few years, the mission became an independent parish and he became its first Rector, it being named All Saints Church. Since 1911 he has resided in Oakville, Conn., and helped build up the Parish. Children: 2559. Catherine Emma, b. Oct....

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Frances Adelaide Todd Treloar of Fall River MA

TRELOAR, Frances Adelaide Todd8, (Orrin K.7, William6, Simeon5, Joel4, Ithamar3, Michael2, Christopher1) married Charles Elmer, son of John Treloar, who is an independent manufacturer of hardware at Yalesville, where they reside. Mrs. Treloar spent all her years until 18 at school and had the special advantage of the State Normal at New Haven. She then spent a couple years in the home of her brother, the Rev. Wm. E. M. Todd, a former well known minister of New England, in Rhode Island and at Fall River, Mass. While at the latter place a large number of young people united with the church and among them she received the rite of Baptism and was admitted into the communion of Broadway–now Pilgrim–Congregational church of which her brother was then the installed pastor. Spending some three more years with her mother, she was then married at the home, her brother, then in the west, returning expressly to officiate at the wedding. Many people in all the walks of life, from Watertown, North Haven, Meriden and Wallingford were in attendance. Fannie, as she is called by her intimates, was always of a most amiable nature, winning the esteem and affection of a wide circle of those about her age in the three towns in which she had lived, Wallingford, Bristol, R. I. and Fall River, Mass., where she was a prime favorite with...

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Biography of George M. Skinner

George M. Skinner, was born in Easton, Massachusetts, in 1833, son of Harrison G. O. Skinner, a native of Massachusetts, and now a resident of Riverside. His mother, Betsey Holmes, was also a native of Massachusetts. Mr. Skinner was reared and schooled in his native place, and given the advantage of a common-school education until seventeen years of age. He then located in Brockton, Massachusetts, working in the boot and shoe manufactories until 1863. In that year he responded to the call of his country for troops, and enlisted in Company F, Fifty-Eighth Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry. His attention to duty and soldierly bearing was soon recognized, and he was promoted to be Sergeant. Mr. Skinner served gallantly throughout the war, and was not discharged from the service until August, 1865. During his service he participated in some of the most arduous campaigns and the hardest-fought battles that are chronicled in our history. His regiment was attached to the Ninth Army Corps, under the command of General Burnside, in the Army of the Potomac. He was engaged in the battles of the Wilderness, Spottsylvania, North Anna, South Anna, Cold Harbor, and the siege of Petersburg, mine explosion in front of Petersburg. He was wounded and compelled to leave the field, and did not return to duty until the fall of 1864: from that time he was actively engaged in the...

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Biography of J. Herbert L. Smead

J. HERBERT L. SMEAD – A well known figure in business circles in Erving, and in social and civic interests in Orange, is J. Herbert L. Smead, whose lifelong activities have been of a practical nature and whose present success as the manager of the Heywood-Wakefield Company in Erving, places him among the thoroughly outstanding men of the day. Mr. Smead is a son of J. Henry Smead, who died, March 17, 1924, at the age of eighty-five years and who throughout the greater part of his lifetime was an employee of the New Bedford Post Office. The mother, Sarah Adell Smead is also now deceased and both these families are prominent ones in this State. J. Herbert L. Smead was born in Greenfield, November 8, 1870. Receiving his education in the local public schools, he removed to New Bedford, Massachusetts, with the family as a lad and there learned the printer’s trade. In 1886, he became a resident of Gardner where for twenty-eight years he was associated with the chair industry. He started as a bookkeeper with the old Heywood plant and remained with the Heywood interests permanently. When he was detailed to his present responsibilities a few years ago, he was serving as treasurer of the Washburn & Heywood Chair Co., and assistant secretary of the parent plant in Gardner. When the Heywood-Wakefield Company established their new...

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Biography of Frederick Bridgman Shaw

FREDERICK BRIDGMAN SHAW, farmer, of South Amherst, Massachusetts, was born April 16, 1876. The family to which he belongs is one of the oldest and most noted in New England. (I) The immigrant ancestor was Abraham Shaw, who came from Yorkshire, England, in 1636. He was admitted as a freeman, March 9, 1636-37, and at the time was a proprietor of Watertown. When his house there was burned down in October, 1636, he moved to Dedham. He signed the famous compact, and was elected, September 6, 1638, a constable of Dedham. Abraham Shaw moved to Cambridge, where he became a town officer. He received a grant of “Coal or iron ore which may be found in any common land in this country’s disposing.” The grant was dated November 2, 1637, and it is presumed he made a search for minerals at a time when the earth in New England was expected to yield great mineral wealth. He was permitted to erect a corn mill, February 12, 1636-37. He married Bridget Best. He died in 1638, and left a will bequeathing to his children, through his eldest son, Joseph. His son John, with Joseph, received his lot at Dedham. He also owned coal mines in Halifax, England. Edward Allen administered the estate. Children of Abraham Shaw: Joseph, who settled in Weymouth; John, of further mention; Mary, born about 1638; Martha,...

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Biography of Dr. John Baptiste Philip Sainte-Marie

City physician of Pittsfield, who was reelected to that office in 1924, he is a native of Chicago, Illinois, son of Elie Andrew and Rose Anna (Cyr) Sainte-Marie. When John Baptist Philip was two and one-half years old, the family moved to the city of Montreal, Canada. He was given a finished classical education at the Jesuits’ College of Quebec, and then entered the medical department of La Val University, from which he was graduated in the class of 1896 with the degree of M. D. Dr. Sainte-Marie was appointed house physician, at different times, of three hospitals in Montreal. He entered upon the practice of medicine in Montreal and had an active career in that city. He was president for five years of the St. John the Baptist Society of Montreal, Western Division; was vice-president of the Montreal Literary Society; vice-president of the Union Catholic Society, founder of a branch of the Artisans of Francois Society of Montreal. Dr. Sainte-Marie moved, in 1916, from Montreal to Taunton, Massachusetts, where he practiced his profession until December, 1921, when he moved to Pittsfield. In 1923 he was elected city physician, and reelected in February of the current year, 1924. He is also a member of Hillcrest Hospital staff. Dr. Sainte-Marie is a member of the Massachusetts Medical Society, the St. John the Baptist Society, of which he is the medical...

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