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Location: Bristol County MA

Osborn Family of Fall River Massachusetts

During the latter half of the century but recently closed and on into the present one, during the period of the great growth and development as an industrial center of Fall River, the name Osborn has stood out conspicuously in the business life of the city. Reference is made notably to the Osborn brothers — the late Hon. Weaver and James Munroe Osborn — for many years among the most prominent mill promoters and bankers of Fall River; and they have been followed by a generation now representative of the name and family, Mr. James E. Osborn, the son...

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Descendants of Captain Michael Pierce

The Pierce family is one of the ancient Colonial families of the Commonwealth, the forerunners of the name playing a conspicuous part as masters of vessels bringing hither emigrants from England. For several generations there has lived in New Bedford a branch of the old Rehoboth and Swansea Pierce family, descendants of Capt. Michael Pierce, who have been leading-spirits in the community — names especially conspicuous in the industrial life of the town and vicinity. Reference is made particularly to some of the descendants of the late Otis Norton Pierce, whose son, the late Hon. Andrew Granville Pierce, was...

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Descendants of John Ames of West Bridgewater MA

The Ames surname is of early English origin, and the family living at Bristol bore the following coat of arms: Argent, on a bend cotised sable, three roses of the field. Motto: Fama Candida rosa dulcior. Crest: A white rose. (I) John Ames was buried at Bruton, Somersetshire, England, in 1560. (II) John Ames (2), son of John, died in 1583; married Margery Crome. Children: John Ames. Launcelot Ames. William Ames. (III) John Ames (3), son of John (2), born in 1560, died in 1629, married Cyprian Browne. Children: William Ames. John Ames, went to New England, settling first...

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Descendants of Richard Borden of Fall River MA

The Borden family is an ancient one both here in New England and over the water in old England, as well as one of historic interest and distinction. The New England branch has directly or indirectly traced the lineage of the American ancestor, Richard Borden, many generations back in English history. His first English forbear went over to England from Bourdonnay, Normandy, as a soldier under William the Conqueror, and after the battle of Hastings — A.D. 1066 — was assigned lands in the County of Kent, where the family afterward became useful, wealthy and influential, the village where...

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Descendants of Peter Crapo

Through the greater part of the last century and up to the present writing, the name of Crapo has stood in and about New Bedford as a synonym for useful citizenship. Here have lived during that period Henry Howland Crapo and William W. Crapo, father and son, of whom a recent biographer says: “Among the many citizens of New Bedford and Dartmouth who have achieved high honor, and whose names are held in respect wherever they are known, are Henry H. Crapo and his son William W. Crapo. Born on a Dartmouth farm, from the sterile soil of which...

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Biography of David Arthur Brown

David Arthur Brown, Manager and Treasurer of the Concord Axle Company of Penacook, an ex-member of the New Hampshire legislature, and a veteran of the Civil War, was born in Attleboro, Mass., May 14, 1839, son of Henry H. and Mary Ann (Daggett) Brown. His parents were natives of Attleboro. On the father’s side he is descended from an Englishman who settled in Massachusetts in the year 1624. His great-grandfather was John Brown, and his grandfather was David Brown. On the mother’s side his genealogy is traced through her father, Otis Daggett, of the seventh generation, Joab of the sixth, John of the fifth, Ebenezer of the fourth, John of the third, and Thomas of the second, to the first John, of Martha’s Vineyard, who, born in England, came to this country in 1630 with Governor Winthrop, of whom he is said to have been a relation. David Arthur Brown was educated in the public schools of Penacook and at the academy in New London, N.H., completing his studies at the age of nineteen. At intervals in the period of his school life he worked with his father in the cotton-mill at Penacook. Later he entered the repair shops, where he remained until the outbreak of the Civil War. In August, 1861, being a proficient band musician, he enlisted as a leader of the band connected with the Third...

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American Baker Genealogies

The following page consists of short genealogies of American Baker families. Genealogy of Daniel Baker Genealogy of Eber Baker of Marion Ohio Genealogy of Edward Baker of Saugus Massachusetts Genealogy of Edward D. Baker of Salem Massachusetts Genealogy of Elleazer Baker of Dutchess County NY Genealogy of George Baker of Pownal Vermont Genealogy of Howard Baker of Solon Maine Genealogy of Joseph Baker of Marshfield Massachusetts Genealogy of Nicholas Baker of Scituate Massachusetts Genealogy of Thomas Baker of East Hampton Connecticut Genealogy of Alexander Baker L156 ALEXANDER BAKER: b. 1607; d. ?; came to America in 1635 and settled in Boston. Later the family moved to Conn. L157. JOSHUA BAKER: b. 1642; d. 1717; m. Hannah Minturn. L158. JOSHUA BAKER: b. 1677; d. 1740; m. Marion Hurburt. L159 JOSHUA BAKER: b. 1706; d. 1770; m. Phoebe Wilkwire. L160 JARED BAKER: b. 1746; d. 1822; m. Phoebe Harris. L161 ANIEL BAKER: b. 1770; d. 1851; m. Sarah Raymond. L162 DANIEL ALBERT: b. 1810; m. Harriet Vander Cook; moved to Ohio. Daniel Albert: m. Arabella Benson. Annie Louise: b. 1870; m. Charles Pearsall. Charles. Marion; m. Emerson Goodrich. Arabella; b. 1920. Joeleen; b. 1923. James. Isabel; m. John Fike. Amos. Anna L. Marion S.: b. 1872; d. 1927; m. Dr. Eugene Beodles. Howell N.: b. 1877; m. 1907 to Maude Jessup. Carolyn S.: b. 1909. Howell North; b. 1910. George R.:...

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Biography of James E. Barnard

James E. Barnard is a lawyer of prominence at Franklin, N.H., his native place. He was born on January 29, 1863, son of the Hon. Daniel and Amelia (Morse) Barnard. His father, Daniel Barnard, was born January 23, 1827, in Orange, N.H. Naturally of a studious turn of mind, as a youth he attended the academy in winter, and worked on his father’s farm in the summer months. He subsequently taught school in different counties of New Hampshire. In 1851 he began to read law with the Hon. George W. Nesmith, and in 1854 he became junior partner in a law firm with the Hon. Austin F. Pike. Mr. Nesmith retired from active business in 1863; and Mr. Barnard withdrew from the connection he had formed, and started out for himself at Franklin, where he had a large practice for over thirty years. In 1860-62 he was State Representative, in 1865-66 President of the State Senate, 1870-71 member of the Governor’s Council, in 1872 he was a member of the Republican Committee that met in convention at Philadelphia, Pa., in 1867 he was County Solicitor, and in 1872 he was re-elected to that position. He was a Trustee of the Franklin Savings Bank, and was a Director and also Vice-President of the Franklin National Bank of Franklin Falls. He was appointed Attorney General in 1887, and held the office...

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Dighton Rock Inscriptions

An in-depth look at the Dighton Rock inscriptions, including a descriptive analysis of the petroglyphs by the Iroquioan Meda, Chingwauk, in 1839 at the behest of Henry Schoolcraft. Included with the article are Henry’s own deductions based on several decades of research into the early North American petroglyphic arts. Photographs of the rock, as well as drawn replications of both the petroglyph and the inscriptions upon it.

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Biography of Chancey Adams, M.D.

Chancey Adams, M.D., a successful medical practitioner of Concord, was born in North New Portland, Me., March 15, 1861, son of Benjamin and Eliza Briton (Sawyer) Adams. He belongs to a branch of the famous old Massachusetts family of the same name. Henry Adams, the founder of the Massachusetts family, was an English emigrant, who came over to this country in the year 1630, with his eight sons, and settled in Braintree, in the Colony of Massachusetts. Of these eight sons, one subsequently returned to England. The names of the others, according to the records of Massachusetts, were: Peter, Henry, Thomas, Edward, Jonathan, Samuel, and Joseph. Samuel was the father of two sons, one of whom was Joseph Adams, who lived in North Chelmsford, Mass. Joseph was the father of Benjamin Adams, who was the father of William Adams, who was the father of Solomon Adams, who was the great-grand-father of Dr. Adams. Solomon Adams migrated from North Chelmsford, Mass., his native town, to Farmington, Me., at the close of the Revolutionary War. The record shows that he had served his country during that war from May 15, 1777, to May 15, 1780, in Captain James Varnum’s company, of Colonel Michael Jackson’s regiment; but his active military service actually extended beyond these dates. William Adams, son of Solomon and grandfather of Dr. Adams, was a native of Farmington, Me....

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Biography of James Humphrey

James Humphrey, as lawyer, editor, judge and state official, firmly established his position throughout a period of half a century as one of the ablest and most popular citizens of Central Kansas. He was born in Nottinghamshire, England, March 8, 1833; came to New England in 1854, and during the succeeding three years was a resident of Fall River, Massachusetts. There he became interested in the Kansas agitation for free statehood and in April, 1857, reached Manhattan. His first employment in connection with the shrievalty was a good test of his pluck, and he so arose to the occasion that he was afterward elected mayor. In 1859 and 1860 he served as assistant county treasurer and in 1861 was head of the office. He also served as justice of the peace, and his trial of the cases brought before him brought so much commendations from the lawyears of both sides that he decided to study law. He was admitted to the bar in 1863. He has previously broken into journalism by editing the Manhattan Express in the absence of C. F. DeVivaldi, who was serving abroad as consul to Brazil. After the Civil war Mr. Humphrey established a large practice, and handled it with such ability that in the spring of 1867 he was appointed judge of the Eighth Judicial District. In the fall of that year he was...

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Biography of Charles Wood Davis

A significantly varied, distinguished and interesting career was that of the late Charles Wood Davis, and fortunate it was for the State of Kansas that he early established his residence within its borders, for his splendid initiative and executive powers came most effectively into play in the furtherance of the eivic, industrial and general material development and progress of this commonwealth. He was one of the famous argonauts of the year 1849 in California, was long and prominently identified with railway interests, was a recognized authority in all matters pertaining to the basic industry of agriculture, was a pioneer in the exploiting of the coal-mining industry in Kansas, and there seemed to be no bounds set about his constructive energy and broad-minded public spirit. By very reason of his two personal names he became widely known and highly honored throughout the Middle West by the sobriquet of “Cotton Wood Davis.” He was one of the venerable and honored pioneer citizens of Sedgwick County, Kansas, at the time of his death, and it is signally fitting that in this history of the state and its people be entered a tribute to the memory of this strong, resourceful and noble man. Charles Wood Davis was born at South Dartmouth, Massachusetts, on the 17th of April, 1832, and was a scion of the staunchest of colonial stock in New England, where his...

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Biography of Alger, William Rounseville

Alger, William Rounseville, son of Nahum and Catherine Sampson (Rounseville) Alger, was born in Freetown, Bristol County, December 28, 1822. He attended the common schools from the age of four to ten, then began to work for a livelihood; he worked five years in a cotton mill at Hookset, N. H., studied attentively in all available house, educating himself in the various branches of an academic course. He attended an academy in Pembroke, N. H., two years, and one year at Lebanon, N. H. He entered the divinity school of Harvard University in 1844, and was graduated in the class of 1847. He was pastor of the Unitarian church in Roxbury, from 1847 to 1855; then settled in Boston until 1873; then four years minister of Church of the Messiah in New York City. He is now engaged in preaching, lecturing and literary work. Mr. Alger was married in Roxbury, in September 1847, to Anne Langdon, daughter of Giles and Abigail Harris (Langdon) Lodge. Of this union were seven children: Henry Lodge, Abby Langdon, Caroline Rounseville, Arthur Martineau, William Ellerton, Philip Rounseville and Anne Langdon. He has held many offices and delivered many addresses in Masonic bodies and lectured for twenty-five years very extensively through the country before lyceums and literary societies. When chaplain of the Massachusetts House of Representatives in 1863, the prayers he offered were so much...

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