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Location: Blackfoot Idaho

Bingham County

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now While not one of the most populous nor one of the most wealthy counties in the state, Bingham county does not by any means stand at the foot of the list. In 1891 the Idaho Register, published at Idaho Falls, in giving a description of Bingham County, stated that it was the largest county in the state. Its length was one hundred and seventy-six miles, its width ninety miles, and it contained about fourteen thousand square miles, or about eight million acres of land; it extended from the Montana line on the north to within about twenty-one miles of the Utah line on the south. By an act approved March 6, 1893, a strip of about fifty-six miles was taken from the south end of the county and a new county formed, called Bannock county, and by an act approved March 4, at the same session of the legislature, a strip of about seventy-five miles was taken from the north end, forming a new county, called Fremont. This left Bingham county about ninety miles east and west and about forty-five miles north and south. The central portion of the county is traversed by the Snake River, and what is known as the great Snake River valley composes a large part of the central portion of the...

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Biography of C. W. Wernicke

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now The County treasurer of Lincoln County, Idaho, C. W. Wernicke, is also the pioneer hardware merchant of Shoshone, and throughout the eighteen years of his residence here has been prominently connected with the various interests which have contributed to the growth, prosper-ity and advancement of town and County. He belongs to that class of progressive German citizens who have severed the ties binding them to the old world in order to seek homes in the land of the free. He was born in Goldburg, Germany, on the 13th of January, 1847, and in the land of his nativity acquired his literary education and learned the tinsmith’s trade. He was a young man of nineteen years when he decided to come to America. Hearing of the advantages afforded by the United States to young men of energy, diligence and ambition, he crossed the Atlantic resolved to try his fortune among new scenes. He had only money enough to pay his passage, and landed in New York city almost penniless, ignorant of the language and customs of the people among whom his lot was to be cast. With resolute heart, however, he started out to seek work and secured employment at his trade in Lyons, New York. Later he worked as a tinsmith in Jackson and in Paw...

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Biography of Henry W. Curtis

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now There is a sprinkling of English blood in Idaho which adds to the moral and financial vitality of the state. One of the leading citizens of Blackfoot of English birth is ex-County Treasurer Henry W. Curtis, who was also the pioneer hardware merchant of that city. Mr. Curtis was born in London, England, August 9, 1854. His father, Joseph H. Curtis, of an old English family, married Miss Sarah Morrell, a native of London. They had seven children born to them in England, and in 1860 they came to the United States, to found a home in the New World. Mr. Curtis was a silk-weaver by trade and for about a year was employed at stocking-weaving in Philadelphia. In 1861 the family moved to Utah, and there the father died in 1877, aged sixty-four years. His wife has attained the age of eighty-four, and their children are all living. Henry W. Curtis, the youngest of the seven, was educated in public schools of Utah and began to earn his living at the early age of nine years. He has not only depended on himself since that time, but has helped others, and may be called a self-educated man. In his early efforts to get on in the world he engaged four years in freighting from Corinne,...

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Biography of James M. Stevens

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now In a new state like Idaho the really prominent men who are native to the soil are comparatively few, for the reason that few men are able to attain prominence young enough to take this distinguished position. James M. Stevens, junior member of the firm of Detrich, Chalmers & Stevens, of Blackfoot, one of Idaho’s law firms, has the distinction of being one of Idaho’s native sons. He was born January 30, 1873, at his father’s home on the bank of the Snake river, in what was then Oneida county, near where the city of Blackfoot has since come into being. He is of Scotch-English ancestry, and his forefathers settled early in New England, where four generations of the family were born, at Lynn, Massachusetts, and was there reared and educated. While yet a young man, he went to California. Not long after his arrival there, the war of the states being in progress, he enlisted in the United States army, with the expectation that the regiment would be sent south to take part in aggressive fighting. To the bitter disappointment of Judge Stevens and his comrades-in-arms, the regiment was, instead, sent into Utah to keep the Indians in subjection and defend emigrants and settlers against their attacks. At the expiration of his term of service...

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Biography of N. P. Nielson

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now N. P. Nielson, treasurer of Bannock County, and a pioneer grocer of Pocatello, is a native of Denmark, his birth having occurred in that country, September 17, 1852. He was the second in order of birth in a family of two sons and two daughters, whose parents were Peter and Mary (Henson) Nielson, also natives of the same country. The subject of this sketch came to America in 1868, and four years later the rest of the family also crossed the Atlantic, taking up their residence in Utah, where the father died at the age of sixty-four years, the mother passing away several years previously. The brother of our subject is also deceased, but the two sisters are still living. N. P. Nielson acquired his education in the schools of his native land, and after coming to the United States took up his residence in Salt Lake City, Utah, where he secured a position as clerk in the old Townsend House. Later he occupied a similar position in the Keeney House, in Ogden, Utah, and in 1880 he came to Blackfoot, Idaho, where he assisted in opening a hotel, also known as the Keeney House. There he remained until 1885, when he took up his residence in Pocatello. Here he served as clerk in the Pacific...

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Biography of Hon. George B. Rogers

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Some men achieve success almost instantaneously, some by slow accretion, others only after long and patient working and waiting. The experience of men who are willing to work persistently and intelligently and wait calmly goes to prove that success may surely be attained during an ordinary lifetime, and no man not cut off at an untimely age need work and wait in vain. These reflections have been suggested by a consideration of the career of Hon. George B. Rogers, receiver of the United States land office at Blackfoot, Idaho, who is one of the most prominent and successful citizens of the state. He was born in Dodgeville, Iowa County, Wisconsin, February 22, 1842. His father, John Rogers, was born in England and there married Miss Hannah Bailey. They came to the United States in 1837, bringing with them two daughters, named Susan and Elizabeth, and located at Mineral Point, Wisconsin, where Mr. Rogers engaged in lead-mining and later became a farmer. He died in 1880, aged seventy-six years, and his wife passed away in 1882, aged seventy-three. They were lifelong members and supporters of the Methodist Episcopal church. Six more children were born to them in Wisconsin, of whom George B. Rogers was the second in order of nativity and of whom two others are living....

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Biography of John C. Millick

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now The large steam roller-process flouring mill at Blackfoot, Idaho, represents one of the prominent business interests of that city. It is the property of Mr. John C. Millick, and it is to give some account of Mr. Millick’s career that these paragraphs are presented. Mr. Millick is a very modest and unassumingman, but he is very busy and successful. He is of German descent and was born in Dodge County, Wisconsin, August 4, 1854, a son of Joseph Millick, who had come to that part of the country from Germany, accompanied by his wife and children. Joseph Millick died in Dodge county, Wisconsin, in 1876, aged seventy-eight years, his wife also having died there, in 1863. They had ten children, all but one of whom are living. Of these John C. was the seventh in order of birth, and he was only nine years old when his mother died. Though he began to earn his own living when he was thirteen, he found some time to attend such schools as existed in that part of Wisconsin at that time. When he was eighteen years old he went to northern Kansas, when he found employment as a farm hand and later farmed on his own account, on rented land. From Kansas he came, in 1880, to the...

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Biography of Robert V. Cozier

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now On the roll of Idaho’s statesmen and eminent representatives of the bar is found the name of Hon. Robert V. Cozier, who has left the impress of his individuality upon the legislation and public progress. He is a man of strong mentality, of marked patriotism and broad humanitarian principles, and is therefore well fitted for leadership in the public movements which affect the welfare of the commonwealth. He is now acceptably filling the position of United States attorney for Idaho, and his comprehensive knowledge of the principles of jurisprudence and his ability in handling intricate legal problems make him a most competent official. Robert V. Cozier is a native of Ohio, his birth having occurred in the town of Wapakoneta, October 20, 1867. He is of German and Irish lineage, but for several generations the family has been represented in America. His father, Rev. B. F. W. Cozier, was born in Pennsylvania in 1836, on what is now the battlefield of Gettysburg, and is a prominent minister in the Methodist Episcopal church, having devoted his entire life to preaching the gospel of peace and righteousness among men. In 1870 he removed to Iowa, where the greater part of his ministerial labor has been performed. For years he was a presiding elder, connected with different conferences in...

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Biography of William H. Stufflebeam

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now There is not a more popular man in Idaho either as Elk or “landlord” than William Herman Stufflebeam, proprietor of the Blackfoot Hotel, at Blackfoot; there is not a man better liked on purely personal grounds; and there is not a man to whom the citizens of Idaho would more confidently entrust the unraveling of a difficult problem or the settlement of important monetary interests than to Mr. Stufflebeam, who is a business man of careful and comprehensive training. William Herman Stufflebeam was born at Whitehall, Washington county, New York. His paternal great-grandfather and his grandfather fought together in the patriot cause during the Revolutionary struggle, the former as captain and the latter as private in his father’s company. After peace and American independence were established, these two patriot soldiers became prosperous farmers in Hudson County, New York, and upon the death of the father the old homestead descended to the son. William G. Stufflebeam, father of the subject of this review, was born in 1834 and married Miss Olive Mosher, a native of Washington County. He was long superintendent of the New York & Lake Champlain Transportation Company. In 1883, in company with his son, William Herman Stufflebeam, he came west on a prospecting tour, and bought a stock ranch twenty-five miles south of Blackfoot....

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Biography of Frank Sigel Dietrich

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now The day of the lawyer who depended upon inspiration, and whose chief preparation for forensic victory was the acquisition of alcoholic stimulants, is past. The lawyer of today depends not alone upon inspiration, but also upon hard work in preparing his cases for trial, and upon their careful presentation and handling in the courts. Usually he has to convince hard-headed business men of the merits of his case, which involves nothing of sentiment or of sensationalism and much of pecuniary interest and of commercial right and wrong, pure and simple. He goes before a judge and jury cool, collected, alert, bristling with business, equipped with a thorough knowledge of principles and decisions applicable to his case, ready for emergencies, and with the persuasive oratory of reason and precedent clearly expressed and logically arrayed, but having little need for mere theatrical display. Thus equipped, thus discharging his duty to his client, to the court, and to himself, he wins upon the law and the evidence, ably interpreting the one and bringing out the full force of the other. Such a modern, successful lawyer is the subject of this sketch, concerning whose life we have gathered the following facts. Frank Sigel Dietrich was born near Ottawa, Kansas, January 23, 1863, and came of German ancestry. Both his father...

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Biography of W. H. Puckett

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now The junior member of the well known law firm of Hawley & Puckett is the gentleman whose name forms the caption of this sketch. He is still a young man, but has attained a position of distinction at the bar that many an older practitioner might well envy. He was born at Herndon Place, Ballard County, Kentucky, on the 8th of August 1869. His father, W. J. Puckett, was a native of Jackson, Mississippi, and became one of the prominent lawyers of Kentucky, where he practiced successfully for a number of years. He is now living retired in Denver, Colorado. In the public schools of his native town W. H. Puckett acquired his preliminary education, which was supplemented by a course in the Baptist College at Blandville, Kentucky. In 1885 he went to Denver, Colorado, and was graduated in the Denver Business College, in 1888. The same year he became a student in the Washington and Lee University, of Lexington, Virginia, where he was graduated with the degree of Bachelor of Law. The year 1891 witnessed his arrival in Idaho. He secured a position as stenographer in the law office of Hawley & Reever, at Blackfoot, and in 1892 came with them to Boise, where he has since made his home. He continued with the firm...

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Biography of Judge Frederick S. Stevens

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now The distinguished citizen of Bingham County, Idaho, whose name appears above, has lived longer in that county than any other resident now alive. He has at different stages of his life in the county been soldier, pioneer, storekeeper, farmer and jurist, and in each capacity has won the respect of all who have been associated with him, and he is widely known as one of the most prominent citizens of southeastern Idaho. Frederick S. Stevens was born in Lynn, Massachusetts, August 7, 18^8. Benjamin Stevens, his grandfather, was born in Massachusetts, as was also Benjamin Stevens, Jr., his father. Benjamin Stevens married a native of Lynn, Massachusetts, and a daughter of Smith Downing. He was a tanner, and died in 1856, at the age of forty-four years. His widow lived seventy-five years, her death occurring in 1896. They were devout and helpful members of the Methodist Episcopal church. They had four children, three of whom are living. Judge Frederick S. Stevens, the eldest of the survivors of his father’s family, was graduated from the Lynn (Massachusetts) high school. He went early in life to California, via the Isthmus of Panama, and was there a miner, a bookkeeper and a clerk in turn, until the outbreak of the civil war. In April 1861, he enlisted in Company...

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Biography of Henry Dunn

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now There was a romantic side to early western history, romantic in the reading, and romantic and perilous in the living, which will always have a place in American literature. The men who participated in it were of the quality of manhood of which good soldiers are made, with a dash of the explorer, the adventurer and the pioneer. They were the avant heralds of advancing civilization, and when civilization came they were quick to avail themselves of the advantages it offered, and were more farseeing than some other men when it came to penetrating the future and sizing up its possibilities and probabilities. Such a pioneer was Henry Dunn, of Blackfoot, who came to the west at the very dawn of its civilization and has made a place for himself and for his posterity in a country which has a glorious future and a destiny ever onward. Henry Dunn, one of the pioneer stockmen of Bingham County, came to Idaho in 1864. He was born in Liverpool, England, December 9, 1840, a son of James and Mary (Spinsby) Dunn, and is descended from a long line of English ancestors. When he was seven years old his parents emigrated to Canada. There his mother died at the age of seventy-four, in 1893, and his father, in the...

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Biography of William Kirkpatrick

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Wherever his lot may be cast in the north, the intelligent, progressive southerner finds a welcome and makes many friends. If he fought on “the other side” in our great civil war, he is everywhere regarded more highly than the southern union man or the southern non-combatant. He is made to feel at home by Grand Army men and is quickly on fraternal terms with those whom once he faced on the field of battle. William Kirkpatrick is one of the prominent pioneer farmers of Blackfoot, Idaho, where he located in 1873, on one hundred and sixty acres, west of the town site, which property he still owns. The county was then unsurveyed and had few inhabitants except Indians, with whom the whites at times had misunderstandings but managed to evade actual warfare. Mr. Kirkpatrick improved his property, cultivated it profitably and gave much attention to stock raising. He has a fine water right and is enabled to raise large quantities of alfalfa hay, upon which he feeds his stock in winter. He has become an influential citizen and is a Democrat of the deepest dye, declaring his intention to vote the Democratic ticket as long as he lives. His ideals of military genius and statesmanship are Robert E. Lee and Grover Cleveland. He is active...

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Biography of Samuel J. Rich

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now A representative of the legal fraternity and a well known business man of Idaho Falls, Samuel J. Rich has spent his entire life in the west and is thoroughly identified with its interests and progress. He was born in Centerville, Davis county, Utah, May 1, 1860, his parents being Charles C. and Emeline (Grover) Rich, natives of Kentucky and New York, respectively, and pioneers of Utah of the year 1847. In 1864 they removed from Utah to Bear Lake county, Idaho, Mr. Rich being the pioneer and first while settler in Bear Lake valley. In the common schools of Bear Lake County, Idaho, Samuel J. Rich acquired his preliminary education, which was supplemented by a two-years college course in Provo City, Utah. On completing his literary education he took up the study of law, in 1886, and after familiarizing himself with many of the principles of jurisprudence was admitted to the bar in 1889. The following year he was appointed county attorney of Bear Lake County, serving until 1893, and at the same time was identified with the industrial interests of that locality. In connection with others of the family he built the first roller mill in Bear Lake County, and was the general manager of the enterprise until his removal from the county, in 1893....

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