Location: Belmont County OH

Biographical Sketch of Dr. John N. Raley

John N. Raley is a native of Belmont county, Ohio, and was born April 11, 1829; his parents were natives of Virginia. He was educated at the Mount Pleasant Seminary, of Mount Pleasant, Ohio, and lived upon a farm until he was twenty-two years old, then began clerking on a steamboat on the Illinois River, where he was engaged for two years. He was next employed in keeping books for grain merchants on the Chicago & Alton Railroad, in Illinois, and after a few years there moved to the State of Iowa and engaged in farming for two years. In 1857 he began the study of medicine under the direction of Dr. Schatz, of Elsah, Jersey county, Illinois, and graduated in 1861, at the Eclectic Schools of Cincinnati, Ohio. During 1860 and a part of 1861 he was associated with Dr. H. R. Emmons, late of this county, at Maysville, Arkansas, and was there when the war broke out. After he finished his education he resumed practice in Bond county, Illinois, and in 1863 came to this county and settled at Salem, where he had an extensive practice. Early in 1864 he was commissioned assistant surgeon of the Tenth Regiment Missouri Volunteer Cavalry and served. in that capacity until the regiment was mustered out, June 30, 1865. He then resumed practice in this county, and settled in Jameson soon...

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Biography of James C. Murray

Prominent among the enterprising and substantial business men of Jamesport is the subject of this sketch.┬áJames C. Murray was born in Belmont county, Ohio, April 8, 1847. He is the son of John and Rose (Moneghan) Murray, natives of Ireland. His education was acquired in the schools of his native State and immediately after leaving school, at the early age of sixteen years, he enlisted under the stars and stripes in Company E, Ninety-eighth Ohio Infantry, but had great difficulty in getting into the army on account of youthfulness, being several times dismissed and ordered home by the drilling officers, but nothing daunted young Murray’s indomitable perseverance and pluck finally prevailed and he was mustered into the army in the month of July, 1862, and subsequently participated in the battles of Perryville, Chicamauga, Missionary Ridge; was wounded at Jonesborough, Georgia, and sent thence to Nashville, Tennessee, arriving in titne to be present on the occasion of the battle in and around Nashville, where the Federal forces, under General George B. Thomas, brought to a disastrous close the Confederate General John B. Hood’s campaign in Tennessee. While convelascing in the hospital he was detailed as steward, and had under his charge one hundred and twenty patients, one of whom was taken with the smallpox, and in assisting. him in an ambulance, he contracted that dread disease and for four weeks...

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Slave Narrative of George Jackson

Interviewer: Bishop & Isleman Person Interviewed: George Jackson Location: Steubenville, Ohio Place of Birth: Loudon County, Virginia Date of Birth: Feb. 6, 1858 Age: 79 WPA in Ohio Federal Writers’ Project Bishop & Isleman Reporter: Bishop [HW: Revised] Topic: Ex-Slaves. Jefferson County, District #5 July 6, 1937 GEORGE JACKSON Ex-Slave, 79 years I was born in Loudon County, Virginny, Feb. 6, 1858. My mother’s name was Betsy Jackson. My father’s name was Henry Jackson. Dey were slaves and was born right der in Loudon County. I had 16 brothers and sisters. All of dem is dead. My brothers were Henry, Richard, Wesley, John and me; Sisters were Annie, Marion, Sarah Jane, Elizabeth, Alice, Cecila and Meryl. Der were three other chillun dat died when babies. I can remember Henry pullin’ me out of de fire. I’ve got scars on my leg yet. He was sold out of de family to a man dat was Wesley McGuest. Afterwards my brother was taken sick with small-pox and died. We lived on a big plantation right close to Bloomfield, Virginny. I was born in de storeroom close to massa’s home. It was called de weavin’ room-place where dey weaved cotton and yarn. My bed was like a little cradle bed and dey push it under de big bed at day time. My grandfather died so my mother told me, when he was...

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Biographical Sketch of Elmer Ellsworth Enoch

Elmer Ellsworth Enoch began practicing law at Wichita when that city was still on the southwestern frontier, and within the range of his own observation he had witnessed history in its making in that part of the state. His home had been in Wichita upwards of thirty years, and his reputation as an able lawyer had become widely extended. He was born in Morristown, Belmont County, Ohio. February 10, 1864, and was liberally educated in preparation for his professional career. After the public schools he entered Franklin College in his native state, where he was graduated A. B. in 1885. For several years he diligently pursued the study of law, being admitted to the bar at St. Clairsville, Ohio, in 1888, and in the same year he came out to Kansas and opened his office in the little City of Wichita. After a brief period of waiting clients came to him, and entrusted him with their law business. He had had a reputation extending over many years of doing whatever he does do thoroughly, and bringing a conscientions performance to every task entrusted. Official homors and responsibilities were also thrust upon him. In 1895-97 and again from 1901 to 1904, he was clerk of the Probate Court of Sedgwick County. In 1897 he was elected justice of the peace, serving two years. In 1903 he was made probate judge...

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Biography of Hon. James H. Koontz

HON. JAMES H. KOONTZ. – It is a mistake to suppose that all the fortunes are made in the large places. Many of the most considerable competences on the coast have been gained from trade in the small towns. The career of Mr. Koontz is to the point. Born in Belmont County, Ohio, in 1830, young James, upon coming to his physical strength, learned the trade of a carpenter and joiner, thereby acquiring a foundation for a life of independence. Living a time at Mount Pleasant, Iowa, he joined the Ellis train, and in 1862 came across the plains to Oregon, settling the following year at the little town of Umatilla on the desolate shore of the Columbia, – a heaving, driving bank of sand upon the rocks. The place has improved since the old times. Mr. Koontz had but seventy-five cents in his pocket on his arrival; and the stories which he now relates of his first days of work and semi-starvation seem curious and amusing. By diligent application to his trade, fining employment for a time with George L. Hibbard, he soon had money and built a store at Umatilla, buying for a site ten feet of frontage for two hundred and fifty dollars. Here he remained seventeen years, doing a large forwarding and commission business. In 1864 he was appointed postmaster, and held that office seventeen...

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Biographical Sketch of James E. Hyett, M. D.

James E. Hyett, M. D., who had been successfully engaged in practice at St. Marys since 1909, came to Kansas with his parents in 1875. He early learned the lessons of self reliance, and depended upon his own efforts to acquire both a college and a professional training. He was born in Belmont County, Ohio, April 18, 1870. He attended the St. Marys public school, and afterwards was a student in the Academic Department of Washburn College, from which he graduated in 1894. He received his degree of B. S. from Washburn in 1897. Before going to college Doctor Hyett taught school four years in Pottawatomie County and for one year was principal of the high school at Mankato, Kansas. After much hard work he was able to gratify his ambition to enter medical college, and took his training in the Northwestern University Medical School of Chicago, from which he graduated M. D. in 1904. The following year he spent as an interne in a railroad hospital in New Mexico. Doctor Hyett practiced four years at LaCrosse, Kansas, and then in 1909 removed to St. Marys, where he had been accorded a profitable general medical and surgical practice. His offices are in the Erbacher Building. He also owned his home on Eighth Street. Doctor Hyett is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, is a republican in politics and...

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Biography of Captain R. Pickering

The veteran soldier who risked his life in defense of the flag, all things else being equal, takes high rank as a citizen. This may be partly because of the quality of the patriotism of the American public, but there is another reason for the preeminence of the veteran. The man who has the form of character to rise to distinction as a soldier possesses the resourceful perseverance so necessary to success in other fields. Captain R. Pickering, who has been a prominent resident of Genesee from its earliest history, was born in Belmont County, Ohio, May 3, 1842, and comes of a very old and honorable English family. The progenitor of the American branch was Joseph Pickering, who settled in New England in 171 1, and he and his posterity were conspicuous in colonial history and in the struggle for American independence. John Pickering, grandfather of R. Pickering, was born in Virginia, was a successful farmer in that state and removed to Ohio, where he was a pioneer. There his son, Elisha Pickering, father of R. Pickering, was born, and there he married Miss Mary Berry. He removed later in life to Iowa, and thence to Nebraska, where he died in 1801, aged eighty-six years. His wife died two years previously. This worthy couple were of Quaker stock and were strict adherents to the faith of their forefathers....

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Biography of William D. Paul

William D. Paul, who died January 22, 1912, was one of the pioneer citizens of Shawnee County, and left a permanent memorial to his name and to his enterprise in the Town of Pauline in that county, which he founded. He resided continuonsly in Kansas from 1870 until his death, but had first come to Kansas when it was a territory. He was born August 6th, 1836, on a farm in Belmont County, Ohio, a son of Dunbar W. Panl. When he was quite young his parents died, and thus left an orphan he grew up in the homes of friends, his education being greatly negleeted. At the age of twenty, in 1856, he came to Topeka, and for a time was employed on the farm of C. K. Holliday. He also took up a claim at Bennett’s Mound in Shawnee County and proved that up before he returned to Ohio. He went back to Ohio about the time of the Civil war, and became a driver in the quartermaster’s department of the Union army. Later he was made a wagon master, and was in that service until the close of the war. After the war he married Esther A. Stewart of Ohio. They soon came out to Kansas, and located on his claim of 160 acres. In the years that followed he increased his heldings to 320 acres....

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Biography of Archibald Steel Johnson

Archibald Steel Johnson, a resident of Kansas nearly forty years, has one of the very interesting places historically considered. It is located a few miles from North Topeka on rural route No. 6 in Shawnee County, and is a farm of eighty acres which he bought in 1907. The history of this farm is especially interesting. The site comprises the old historic Town of Indianola. This town was established when the Territory of Kansas was new. It was the home of a large number of abolitionists, though there were two or three pro-slavery families in the same community. When this was written in 1916 Mr. Johnson was storing a large crop of alfalfa hay into the building which had formerly been the Indianola Hotel. That hotel is sixty-two years old, stands out weatherbeaten and inconspicuous, though many of its timbers are as sound as when it was built. It has associations with many prominent men and events of early Kansas. It was the meeting place of the abolitionists and the builders of the hotel and the founders of the town expected that the capital of the state would be put there. Not far from the hotel were the homes of some of the first settlers including the Readers, Owens, Rameys, McNowns and others. Born in Belmont County in Eastern Ohio in 1864, Archibald S. Johnson is a son of...

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Biographical Sketch of William Gaston

Gaston, William; clergyman; born, Columbiana County, O., April 19, 1835; son of James W. and Rebecca Conke Gaston; A. B., Washington College, Pa., 1858; grad. Western Theological Seminary, 1861; (D. D., 1887, LL. D., 1892, Richmond College Ohio); married, Julia M. Cunningham, of Smith’s Ferry, Pa., May 4, 1855 (died March, 1896); second wife, Jennie L. Wise, of Washington, Pa., Aug. 2, 1898; ordained Presbyterian ministry, 1861; pastor, Smith’s Ferry, Pa., 1861-1865; First Church, Bellaire, O., 1865-1880; North Church, Cleveland, 1880-1907; Emeretus, 1907; chaplain U. S. Christian Comma in Civil War, director University of Wooster, O.; Republican; Presbyterian; has traveled in Europe and the...

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Biographical Sketch of George C. Todd

Todd, George C.; railroad division supt.; born, Flushing, O., June 7, 1867; started as telegraph operator with the C. L. & W. Ry., in August, 1883; train dispatcher, October, 1887, to September, 1889; train dispatcher, Northern Pacific Ry., September, 1889, to Jan. 1, 1890; from that date to April, 1902, train dispatcher N. Y. S. & St. L. Ry.; chief train dispatcher, 1902 to 1907; chief dispatcher to April, 1908; train master to June, 1912; supt. telegraph to date; now division superintendent same...

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Carter, Annabel – Obituary

The Passing of Mrs. Carter On Saturday evening June 26th came the close of one of the noblest lives of Enterprise. Though she had been battling against a dreadful disease for many months and had been expected for days, the fact that she had at last entered the Great Beyond came with a shock of personal bereavement to the large circle of friends. By the little children who had the privilege of knowing her she was endearingly called “Grandma Carter” and she was a lovely example of that noblest type of woman, a Christian mother to the community. Annabel Fulton was born in Belmont county Ohio Jan. 28, 1856, at the time of her death being 64 years, 5 months and 6 days of age. At the age of four years she went with her parents to the state of Missouri and at the age of twenty-three was united in marriage to James R. Carter. They came west a few years later and settled in Wallowa county on Alder Slope, thirty years ago. They became residents of Enterprise, nine years ago having since resided here. For the past year Mrs. Carter’s health has been noticeably falling. On April 21 she went to Portland to consult Dr. Rocky and underwent an operation there five days later. But all that medical skill could do was unavailing to allay her suffering which...

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Biography of Robert N. McMillen, M. D.

Robert N. McMillen, M. D. Doctor McMillen began the practice of medicine in Kansas thirty-five years ago, and was among the first physicians in Pratt County. Much of his early practice was among the pioneer homes of that section. For seventeen years his home and offices have been at Iola, and he still carries the burden of a heavy practice at that city. Doctor McMillen represents Scotch ancestry, who came to America many years ago and were pioneers in the State of Kentucky. His grandfather Robert McMillen was a native of Kentucky, was a farmer there, and met his death as a result of accident. Isaac McMillen, the father of Doctor McMillen, was born near Lexington, Kentucky, in 1826. He grew up in that state, and was early attracted into a profession which engaged the services of many men in the early half of the last century just as railroading does today. He became a steamboat captain, piloting boats up and down the Ohio and Mississippi rivers from St. Louis to New Orleans and also from Pittsburg to St. Louis. For a number of years he had his home at Bellaire, Ohio, in Belmont County. He married there, and his death occurred at Bellaire March 23, 1857. The cause of his death was smallpox. In politics he was a democrat. Captain McMillen married Margaret J. Davis, who was born...

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Biography of Robert A. Watt

Robert A. Watt has been closely identified with the business life of Edna for a number of years and is now serving as postmaster of the town. He is widely known throughout Labette County, and had lived there about forty-five years. He is of Scotch descent and his grandfather, Thomas Watt, was probably the immigrant ancestor. Thomas Watt became a farmer in Belmont County, Ohio, where he died. It was in Belmont County, Ohio, that Robert A. Watt was born August 7, 1866. His father, John T. Watt was born in the State of Ohio March 10, 1844. Reared in Ohio, he married in Belmont County, and after farming in that state for some years moved out to Kansas and located at Edna in 1879. There as an early settler he acquired 160 acres, farmed it for a number of years, but finally sold out. In January, 1905, the death of this prominent early citizen occurred at Edna. He was a democrat, had served on the school board, and for many years was an elder in the Presbyterian Church. He married Amanda Worley, who was born in Ohio May 25, 1845, and is still living at Edna. Her children were: Robert A.; Martin, who died at Edna when a youth; Luella, who first married Barney Armstrong, who was an Oklahoma farmer and her present husband is Mr. Taylor, and...

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Biography of William Edward Hogueland

William Edward Hogueland, who had lived in Kansas since 1869, had the unusual distinction of being admitted to the bar when he was nineteen years of age and had been in active practice at Yates Center for the past thirty-six years. He had been elected to a county office just about the time he attained his twenty-first birthday, and having established his home at the county seat while in office he had remained there in the practice of law. Mr. Hogueland’s ancestors came out of Holland in very early times. There were three brothers, one settling in New York, one in Pennsylvania and one in the South. Mr. Hogueland of Yates Center belongs to the Pennsylvania branch of the family. His grandfather, John Hogueland, was a contractor and was accidentally killed at Philadelphia at the age of forty-two. At the time he had a contract to build a rock road out of the City of Philadelphia. William Edward Hogueland was born at Nashville, the county seat of Brown County, Indiana, October 3, 1859. His father was the late W. B. Hogueland of Yates Center, where he died February 15, 1907. His birth occurred November 16, 1823, on the site now occupied by Girard College in the City of Philadelphia. When a young man he removed to Belmont County, Ohio, was married there, and took up the trade of carriage...

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