Location: Beaufort County NC

Beaufort County, North Carolina – Wills 1703-1799

A. 1759 ADAMS, JAMES, Mary (wife), James, Dorothy and Winifred. 1759 ALLEN, TIMOTHY, Rebecca (wife), Ephraim, Martha, Prudence, Salathiel, Jeremiah and Elizabeth. 1760 ADAMS, ANN, Kennedy and John. 1761 ALDERSON, JOHN, Ann (wife), Levi and Simeon. 1765 ABBOTT, WILLIAM, Elizabeth (wife), James and Walter. 1783 ADAMS, JOHN, Ann (wife), Dinah. 1790 ARCHBELL, NATHAN, John, Nathan and Elizabeth. 1791 ADAMS, ABRAHAM, wife, Celia, Ephraim, Levi, Isaac, George and William. 1792 ABLE, ARTHUR, Ann (wife), John and William. 1792 ADAMS, JAMES, Sarah (wife), Henry, Sarah and Abraham. 1796 ADAMS, ISAAC, Thomas and Miles Adams (nephews). 1797 ARCHBELL, SAMUEL, Elizabeth (wife); William, John, Martha. B. 1720 BRIGHT, JOHN, (Hyde precinct) Elizabeth (wife), Henry, Richard, Simon, Lydia, Mary, William, James and John. 1731 BRIGHT, RICHARD, Wife (not named), James, Christian, Elizabeth and Simon. 1760 BUCKINGHAM, STEPHEN, Wife (not named), Solomon and Ebenezer. 1763 BELLOTE, HILARY, Susanna (wife), Caesar, Elizabeth and Ann. 1769 BECTON, RICHARD, Elizabeth (wife); four nephews, George, Edward, Fred and Michael Becton. 1769 BOND, JAMES, Wife (not named), James, Abraham and Ezbona. 1776 BLOUNT, READING, Reading, Joseph, Nathaniel, Jesse and Bryan. 1778 BROOKS, HORATIO, Elizabeth (wife), Peggy, Lawson and John. 1779 BLOUNT, JOSEPH, Sarah (wife), Joseph, Wilson, Mary and Sally. 1779 BONNER, HENRY, Elizabeth, Mary, William, Henry, Patience, James, Ann and Edward. 1779 BOUTWELL, SAMUEL, Ann (wife), Rebecca, Jemima and Abigail. 1780 BROWN, DOROTHY, Bonner, Thomas (friend). 1781 BARROW, JOHN, Martha...

Read More

Slave Narrative of Uncle David Blount

Interviewer: Mary A. Hicks Person Interviewed: David Blount Location: Raleigh, North Carolina Days On The Plantation As told by Uncle David Blount, formerly of Beaufort County, who did not know his age. “De Marster” he refers to was Major Wm. A. Blount, who owned plantations in several parts of North Carolina. Yes mam, de days on de plantation wuz de happy days. De marster made us wuck through de week but on Sadays we uster go swimmin’ in de riber an’ do a lot of other things dat we lak ter do. We didn’t mind de wuck so much case de ground wuz soft as ashes an’ de marster let us stop and rest when we got tired. We planted ‘taters in de uplan’s and co’n in de lowgroun’s nex’ de riber. It wuz on de Cape Fear an’ on hot days when we wuz a-pullin’ de fodder we’d all stop wuck ’bout three o’clock in de ebenin’ an’ go swimmin’. Atter we come out’n de water we would wuck harder dan eber an’ de marster wuz good to us, case we did wuck an’ we done what he ast us. I ‘members onct de marster had a oberseer dar dat wuz meaner dan a mean nigger. He always hired good oberseers an’ a whole lot of times he let some Negro slave obersee. Well, dis oberseer beat some...

Read More

Machapunga Indians

Machapunga Tribe: Said to mean “bad dust,” or “much dirt,” in the native Algonquian language. Machapunga Connections. The Machapunga belonged to the Algonquian linguistic stock. Machapunga Location. In the present Hyde County and probably also in Washington, Tyrrell and Dare Counties, and part of Beaufort. Machapunga Villages. The only village named is Mattamuskeet (probably on Mattamuskeet Lake in Hyde County). However, we should probably add Secotan on the north bank of Pamlico River in Beaufort County, and perhaps the town of the Bear River Indians. Machapunga History. The Machapunga seem to have embraced the larger part of the descendants of the Secotan, who lived between Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds when the Raleigh colony was established on Roanoke Island (1585-86) though the Pamlico may also have been included under the same head. They were reduced to a single village by 1701, took part with other Indian tribes of the region in the Tuscarora War, and at its close were settled on Mattamuskeet Lake with the Coree. In 1761 a small number were still living in North Carolina, evidently at the same place, and the Rev. Alex. Stewart reported that he had baptized seven Indian and mixed-blood children belonging to the “Attamuskeet, Hatteras, and Roanoke.” On a second visit 2 years later he baptized 21 more. Machapunga Population. The Machapunga are estimated by Mooney (1928) to have numbered 1,200, including some...

Read More

J. R. Willand

Private, Hdqrs. Co., Depot Div., 8th Regt. Born in Beaufort County, N.C., July 29, 1896; son of A. and Mrs. Mary D. Willand. Entered the service Aug. 27, 1917, and sent to Camp Jackson, S. C., and transferred to Camp Hill, Va., and back to Camp Jackson, S. C. Mustered out of the service at Camp Jackson, S....

Read More

A. G. Willis

Private, Btry. B, 30th Div., 113th Regt.; of Beaufort County; son of E. K. and Mrs. Willis. Entered service June 2, 1917, at Washington, N.C. Sent to Camp Sevier, transferred to Kelly Field, to Camp Richfield, Tex., then to Camp Jackson. Promoted to rank of Sergt. Mustered out at Camp Jackson Dec. 31,...

Read More

John R. Selby

Messenger, Express. Born in Beaufort County; son of S. T. and Beulah Selby. Entered service April, 1917, at Washington, N.C., and sent to Raleigh, transferred to Portsmouth, detached service. Notified to join service Nov. 11th at Camp Jackson. Mustered out at Raleigh Dec. 19,...

Read More

Charles E. O’Donovan

Chief Yeoman, Navy. Born in Beaufort County; the son of J. J. and C. A. O’Donovan. Entered the service Oct., 1914, at Seattle, Wash. Sent to U. S. S. “Huntington,” then to hospital ship “Mercy.” Made 14 trips overseas. His ship was given credit for sinking a submarine and unofficial credit for another. Mustered out at Charleston, S. C., July 26,...

Read More

Edward James Mitchell

Mechanic, Trench Artly., Btry. B; of Beaufort County; son of N. E. and Frances Mitchell. Entered service June 14, 1918, at Washington, N.C. Sent to Clemson College, S. C. Transferred to Ft. Moultrie, S. C., from there to Ft. Caswell, N.C. Sailed for France Nov. 9, 1918. Returned to USA Jan. 14, 1919, at Newport News, Va. Mustered out at Ft. Monroe, Va., Jan. 19,...

Read More

Frank White Miles

1st Sergt., Inf., M. G. Co., 119th Regt., 30th Div.; from Beaufort County; son of Mr. and Mrs. S. Miles. Husband of Lillian Miles. Entered service at Goldsboro, N.C., June 7, 1917, and sent to Camp Royster, N.C., and then transferred to Camp Sevier, S. C. Promoted 1st Sergt. October, 1918, and transferred to Development Btn. Mustered out of the service at Camp Sevier, S. C., Dec. 9,...

Read More

Thad H. Hodges

Corpl., Air Service, 5th and 2nd A. S. M.; of Beaufort County; son of S. C. and Virginia Hodges. Entered service Dec. 13, 1917, at Washington, N.C. Sent to Ft. Thomas, Ky. Transferred to Camp Hancock, Ga., from there to Camp Merritt, N. J. Sailed for Brest, France, March 26, 1918. Promoted to Corpl., June, 1918. Arrived in USA July 3, 1919, New York. Mustered out at Camp Lee, Va., July 17,...

Read More

Grover C. Lilley

Mess Sergt., 113th F. A., Bty. B, 30th Div. Born in Beaufort County; the son of Mr. and Mrs. Jas. R. Lilley. Entered the service June 29, 1917, at Washington, N.C. Was sent to Camp Sevier, S. C., and from there to Camp Mills. Sailed for France May 8, 1918. Fought at St. Mihiel, Argonne Forest and Woevre. Returned to the USA March 17, 1919, and was mustered out at Camp Jackson March,...

Read More

W. C. Lupton

Sergt., Medical Ambulance 115, 29th Div., 57th Regt.; of Beaufort County; son of W. O. and Mrs. Caroline Lupton. Entered service Aug. 3, 1917. Sent to Camp McClellan Sept. 20, 1917. Sailed to Liverpool, Eng., July 12, 1918. Promoted to Corpl. June 6, 1918; to Sergt. Nov. 19, 1919. Fought at Meuse-Argonne, where he was gassed. Returned to USA, Hoboken, N. J., May 22, 1919. Mustered out at Camp Meade June 3,...

Read More

Jehu Gurgaus

Machinist, Bat. B, 30th Div., 113th Regt.; son of Mr. John and Mrs. L. Gurgaus; of Beaufort County. Entered service June 29, 1917, at Washington, N.C. Sent to Greenville, S. C. Transferred to Camp Mills. Sailed for France May 26, 1918. Was in all battles with 113th until wounded. Gassed at Argonne Forest Oct. 6, 1918. Returned to USA Feb. 22, 1919. Mustered out at Camp Lee, March 8,...

Read More

Claud G. Gardner

2d Lt., M. G. Co.; of Beaufort County; son of A. B. and Mrs. Frances Gardner. Husband of Mrs. Juanita O’Brien. Entered service April, 1918, at Washington, N.C. Sent to A. & M. College. Transferred to Camp Jackson, then to Camp Hancock. Promoted to rank of 2nd Lt. Oct. 11, 1918. On Reserve O. T. S. Mustered out at Camp Hancock Nov. 25,...

Read More

Loris W. Gardner

Musician, Hdqrs. Co., F. A.; County of Beaufort; son of A. B. and Frances Gardner. Entered service July, 1917, at Washington, N.C. Sent to Camp Sevier. Transferred to Camp Mills. Sailed for France 1918. Fought at Argonne Forest, St. Mihiel, Toul Sector. Returned to USA March, 1919. Mustered out at Camp Jackson, March,...

Read More


Free Genealogy Archives

It takes a village to grow a family tree!
Genealogy Update - Keeping you up-to-date!
101 Best Websites 2016

Pin It on Pinterest