Location: Bartow County GA

Biography of John H. Rice

John H. Rice had the distinction of having made his mark in two states of the Union of widely different tendencies–Georgia and Kansas. He was born in Greene County, Tennessee, November 14, 1825, and his father, a native of Virginia, was surveyor of the county, named for twenty-six consecutive terms. Mr. Rice commenced his higher education at Tusculum College, in his native county, of which his maternal uncle, Dr. Samuel W. Doak, was president. He was admitted to the bar in 1845 and, a few months afterward, opened an office at Cassville, Georgia. In 1855, in addition to conducting a fair legal business, he became editor of the Cassville Standard. In the following year he was elected major general of the Twelfth Division of the Georgia State Militia, as the Union candidate, and in 1857 located at Atlanta. There he founded the Franklin Printing Company, which, under his management, had become a large book publishing concern at the time of its destruction in the Civil war. Always a consistent opponent of secession, General Rice was prevented from taking part in the War of the Rebellion on account of a stroke of paralysis which he suffered in 1861. In May, 1865, he was appointed purchasing agent for the Federal cavalry forces then operating in Georgia, and served in that capacity until the forces were mustered out of the service in...

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Biography of John Holt Rice

John Holt Rice was educated at Tusculum College in his native county. At that time his uncle, Dr. Samuel W. Doak was president of the school. In February, 1845, at the age of nineteen, John H. Rice was admitted to the bar. In the following May he located at Cassville, Georgia, where he took up an active practice. In 1855 he became editor of the Cassville Standard, carrying those responsibilities in addition to his legal practice. January 1, 1856, he was elected major general of the Twelfth Division of the Georgia State Militia. That election was important because of its bearing upon the issues then most prominent before the people in Georgia and all the South. John H. Rice was Union candidate for this office, and received a majority of 1,772 votes over Col. E. M. Gault, who was the Southern Rights candidate. The following year Major Rice removed to Rome, Georgia, where he remained a short time, and then went to Atlanta, where he founded the Franklin Printing Company. Under his able management this developed as a large book publishing concern, and it continued to grow until the war came on. During the war the plant was destroyed. The achievements of John H. Rice seems the more remarkable when it is recalled that for more than forty years be lived under the shadow of sudden death. In 1861...

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Biography of Dr. A. B. Davis

The humanizing influences of Christianity are shown in thousands of directions, but in none to a more marked degree than that of medicine, and although there are pretenders in every profession who for a time may overshadow those more worthy, yet they eventually reach their level and the deserving are then shown in their true light. One of the young but already prominent physicians of Marion County, Arkansas, is Dr. A. B. Davis, of Powell. He was born in Adairsville, Ga., April 18, 1857, a son of P. R. Davis (see sketch of J. F. Davis). He was about twelve years of age at the time the family came to Arkansas, and the most of his literary education was obtained in this section, although his initiatory training was obtained in the State that gave him birth. When about twenty years of age he began the study of medicine with Dr. R. J. Pierce, and he received his first course of lectures at Little Rock, but gave up this work and for some five or six years was engaged in teaching school. He then for some time followed mercantile pursuits at Powell, and then went West and for six months was a resident of California. In 1891 he returned to Arkansas and again took up the study of medicine, and in 1891 took a course of lectures at Little Rock....

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Biography of William R. Brooksher, M. D.

WILLIAM R. BROOKSHER, M. D. As a successful physician Dr. Brooksher has done much for the cause of suffering humanity, and has won honor and the evidences of deserved success for himself. While engaged in the cares of his profession, he has not forgotten to fulfill the demands of good citizenship, and no enterprise of a worthy public nature has appealed in vain to him for support. He was born in Bartow County, Ga., in 1864, a son of William R. Brooksher, Sr., a sketch of whom precedes this. Dr. Brooksher was reared on the old home farm in this county, receiving the advantages of the public schools in the vicinity of his home, and made good progress in his studies. In 1885 he took up the study of medicine, instinctively turning to that broad field of human suffering for his life work, and pursued his investigations in the office of Dr. R. J. Pierce, of this county, after which he entered the Missouri Medical College of St. Louis, where he remained for some time. In 1891 he graduated from the Kentucky School of Medicine at Louisville, with the second honors of his class, composed of 155 graduates, and in 1892-3 he took a post-graduate course in New York City, and is, without doubt, the best read medical man of the county. He makes it a point to keep...

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Native American History of Bartow County, Georgia

Bartow County located in northwest Georgia.  It is part of the Atlanta Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area (SMSA.)  Its county seat is Cartersville.   Bartow is named after Colonial Francis S. Bartow, a Confederate officer who was killed in the First Battle of Manassas.  Prior to the Civil War, it was named Cass County in honor of General Lewis Cass of Michigan, Secretary of War under President Jackson, Minister to France and Secretary of State under President Buchannan. Cass played a major role in the removal of Cherokee Indians from northwestern Georgia.  Most of the buildings in Cassville, the county’s original county seat, were burned in the autumn of 1864 as retaliation for a Confederate cavalry raid on the Union supply lines.  The town was never rebuilt, while the county seat was moved to Cartersville. Bartow County is bordered on the north by Gordon County and the east by Cherokee County. Cobb County adjoins Bartow on the southeast side. Gordon County adjoins Bartow on its western side. Paulding County forms its southern boundary. Polk County forms Bartow’s southwestern boundary, while Floyd County adjoins Pickens on the western side.  Pickens County forms a relatively short section of Bartow County’s northeast boundary. Bartow County is the location of the Etowah Mounds National Historic Landmark, one of the most important archaeological sites in the United States. It was an early center of advanced Native...

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Eufaula Tribe

The Eufaula tribe was an independent body as far back as history takes us. According to one of my informants they branched off from Kealedji, while another seemed to think that they originated from Hilibi. Practically no confidence can be placed in these opinions. Not even a plausible guess can be furnished by the living Indians regarding the origin of the name.

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