Location: Asheville North Carolina

Address of Col. Allen T. Davidson at Lyceum Asheville, North Carolina

Extract from an Address delivered by Col. Allen T. Davidson, at Lyceum Asheville, N.C. Nov. 7th, 1890. “The most noted characters of the County who were in public life, were John Welch, General Thomas Love and Col Robert Love. These represented the County of Haywood for many years; preserved and maintained a high reputation until their death. Some of these had formerly represented Buncombe County in the Legislature; notably, Thomas Love, who represented Buncombe County from 1800 to 1808 (the sessions of the Legislature were then annual) afterwards served from Haywood form 1808 to 1828, perhaps, the longest service of any one man in the State continuously. He afterwards moved to Macon District of Tennessee; was elected to the Legislature from that State, and was mad Presiding Officer of the Senate. He was a man of very fine appearance. More that six feet tall, very popular, and a fine electioneer. Many amusing stories are told of him, such as carrying garden seeds in his pockets, and distributing them, always with the assurance that his wife had remembered the voters wife and sent them with her regards. The old gentlemen was fond of a good toddy, but did no resort to the mean subterfuge of electioneering with liquor. On one occasion, however, it is said of him that he signed a pledge of the temperance society which was then very...

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Letter from John P. Arthur to Franklin D. Love

Copy of letter from John P. Arthur to me. John P. Arthur Asheville, N.C. April 17th, 1903. Attorney at Law. Franklin D. Love, Esqr., Georgetown, Texas. Dear Sir: Yours of the 14th, inst., to hand. I spoke to Mrs. Hilliard this morning about writing a sketch of the life of her Grandfather, Robert Love, but she says that she is not in a position to give you as much information as I have already furnished, as she was but nine or ten years old when he died, and she has but a faint recollection of him. I suggest that before you have your account of his life printed, you send it to me here, or to Miss Mary Love Stringfield, at Waynesville for such suggestions, corrections and alterations as they may devise. In this way nothing will be omitted; nothing be included that should not be, and if there are any errors, they should be corrected. At any rate, this is the best means of securing fullness and accuracy. I will make it my business to submit it to all who are in a position to revise it, and return it to you, if you adopt this suggestion. No one seems willing to undertake the task of writing out a full account of his life, for various reasons; but if the first draft or framework is read to them,...

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Samuel Love and Dorcas Bell – Descendants

Dorcas Bell, m. Samuel Love July 3rd, 1759. Descendants 1) Robert Love, b. August 23rd, 1760 in Augusta County, Virginia, and d. in Waynesville, N.C. July 17th 1845. he was married to Mary Ann Dillard Sept 11, the year 1783. Said Mary Ann Dillard was b. 21st day of September 1767, and d. on the 25th, day of March 1842. 2) James Love, b. 3-10-1762, m. Winnesoppea Dillard 3) Thomas Love, b. Nov. 16th, 1766, m. “Patsy” Martha Dillard Jan 15th 1788, and d. in Macon Co. N.C., Nov. 3rd 1834, and left quite a list descendants, some of whom moved to Missouri in 1840 or thereabouts. Martha Dillard born 27th Sept. 1774 and died November 3rd 1804. 4) William Love, b._____? d.______? Bachelor, and d. in Macon County, N.C. He moved from Virginia to N.C. in the year 1829. 5) Mary Love, b._____,m. John Campbell, and d._____. m. Robt. Montgomery 9-10-1784 in Montgomery Co. VA. 6) Sarah Love, b.___?m. John Gamble, d.______? 7) Dorcas Love, B.____? m.Wm. Pendleton (descendants in Ohio) d._______? 8) Winifred Love, b.______? m.____ Montgomery, d._______? The following is the information given me by Mrs. Margaret Hilliard, of Asheville, N.C. and I copy the same as coming from her. In some respects it is a variance with other data that I have received, but taken as whole, it is true-F.D. Love, —–o—– History of the...

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Asheville, North Carolina History

Copied from an article in the Asheville Daily Citizen of 1898, the same being excerpts from an article by Foster Sondley in the same issue, headed “Asheville’s Centenary” to which reference is hereby made-F.D. Love, ——–o———–o——— In speaking of the Court House, he says “On January 23rd, 1807 deeds were made to the Commissioners, Samuel Murry senr., Thomas Foster, Thomas Love, etc., appointed by the General Assembly of the State (North Carolina) to purchase or receive by donation land sufficient for a Public Square in the Town of Asheville in the County of Buncombe and State aforesaid”. This Thomas Love and Thomas Foster were members of the Love and Alexander families. Thomas Love was the brother of my great grandfather, Robert Love, and Thomas Foster was the Father-in-law of my grandfather, James Mitchell Alexander. At the convention of the First County Court of Buncombe County, said State, there were present James Alexander, etc., Esquires, and among the first orders of said Court was an order as follows: “The Court proceeded to the election of a Coroner and did elect Edmund Sams, Esqr:,”; this Sams was the Father-in-law of Thomas Foster, who married said Sams; daughter Orra. In speaking of the “Early settlements in Buncombe County: said Sondley said “At the conclusion of the Revolutionary War in 1781 or 1782)***** several settlements had been effected on the banks of the...

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Slave Narrative of Aleck Woodward

Interviewer: W. W. Dixon Person Interviewed: Aleck Woodward Location: South Carolina Age: 83 “You knows de Simonton place, Mr. Wood? Well, dats just where I was born back yonder befo’ de war, a slave of old Marster Johnnie Simonton. Five miles sorter south sunset side of Woodward Station where you was born, ain’t it so? My pappy was Ike Woodward, but him just call ‘Ike’ time of slavery, and my mammy was name Dinah. My brother Charlie up north, if he ain’t dead, Ike lives in Asheville, North Carolina. Two sisters: Ollie, her marry an Aiken, last counts, and she and her family in Charlotte, North Carolina; sister Mattie marry a Wilson nigger, but I don’t know where they is. “Us lived in a four-room log house, ’bout sixteen all told. Dere was pappy and mammy (now you count them) gran’pappy, Henry Davis, Gran’mammy Kisana, Aunt Anna, and her seven chillun, and me, and my two brothers and two sisters. How many make dat? Seventeen? Well, dat’s de number piled in dere at night in de beds and on de floors. They was scandlous beds; my God, just think of my grands, old as I is now, tryin’ to sleep on them hard beds and other folks piled ‘scriminately all over de log floors! My Gran’pappy Henry was de carpenter, and old marster tell him ‘if you make your...

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Slave Narrative of Sarah Gudger

Interviewer: Marjorie Jones Person Interviewed: Sarah Gudger Date of Interview: May 5, 1937 Location: Asheville, North Carolina Date of Birth: Sept. 15. 1816 Age: 121 Investigation of the almost incredible claim of Aunt Sarah Gudger, ex-slave living in Asheville, that she was born on Sept. 15, 1816, discloses some factual information corroborating her statements. Aunt Sarah’s father, Smart Gudger, belonged to and took his family name from Joe Gudger, who lived near Oteen, about six miles east of Asheville in the Swannanoa valley, prior to the War Between the States. Family records show that Joe Gudger married a Miss McRae in 1817, and that while in a despondent mood he ended his own life by hanging, as vividly recounted by the former slave. John Hemphill, member of the family served by Aunt Sarah until “freedom,” is recalled as being “a few y’ars younge’ as me,” and indeed his birth is recorded for 1822. Alexander Hemphill, mentioned by Aunt Sarah as having left to join the Confederate army when about 25 years of age, is authentic and his approximate age in 1861 tallies with that recalled by the ex-slave. When Alexander went off to the war Aunt Sarah was “gettin’ t’ be an ol’ woman.” Aunt Sarah lives with distant cousins in a two-story frame house, comfortably furnished, at 8 Dalton street in South Asheville (the Negro section lying north...

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Biography of John S. Cairns

North Carolina has produced many men of genius whose lives gave rich prospects of fame and usefulness, who doubtless would have brought honor and glory to the shrine of the “Old North State;” but when life has seemed most hopeful to them, when their work has begun, as it appeared, to cast upon them the halo of success, they have been snatched away from the merited renown of this world to the rest and greater glory of the Unknown. The lamented Fuller, with his thirty ideal years of a faithful life, and the invalid Gillespie, struggling against the evils of a life-devouring disease for the calling of his muse, are illustrations of this lamentable fact-this law of Fate. It is not of one who showed talents for the work of the poet, the statesman, or the orator that I now write, but of one who had gifts which promised him a station of note in the scientific world. John S. Cairns was born February 10, 1862, at Lawrence, Massachusetts. He was of Scotch parentage. His father had left “the banks and braes” of “bonnie Scotland” for the new prosperity of America. Being an intelligent, well-read man, he and his faithful wife brought with them a large and valuable stock of Scotch ideas of work and industry. Mr. Cairns, when his son was about eight years of age, moved to...

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Biography of Natt T. Wagner

Natt T. Wagner manager of the bond department of the First National Bank of St. Louis was born in Asheville, North Carolina, June 12, 1883. His father, J. A. Wagner, is a native of Tennessee, while the latter’s father was a native of Virginia. J. A. Wagner became an architect, devoting his active life to the profession, but is now living retired in Asheville, North Carolina. He has been very prominent in community affairs and during the Civil war served as a captain in the Federal army. He married Emma Brown, who was born in Greene county, Tennessee, and has passed away. Natt T. Wagner is one of a family of nine children, all of whom have attained adult age and are living. He was a pupil in the public schools of Asheville, North Carolina, and in the Davidson College at Davidson, North Carolina, from which he was graduated in 1904 with the Bachelor of Science degree. He then entered the government service, being connected with the allotment of Indian lands in the Indian territory for two years. He then turned his attention to the contracting and bond business in Oklahoma and was thus engaged to the time when he assisted in the organization of a bank at Wichita Falls, Kansas, known as the National Bank of Commerce, of which he became the assistant cashier. He afterward engaged in...

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Biographical Sketch of Harold Graham Alexander

Alexander, Harold Graham; treas. National Screw & Tack Co.; born, Cleveland, Sept. 5, 1882; son of W. D. B. and Lida Graham Alexander; educated at University School, Cleveland; Asheville School, Asheville, N. C.; Yale Scientific School (B. S.); married, Cleveland, June 9, 1908, Eleanor Quayle; issue, one daughter, Eleanor May 4,...

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Biographical Sketch of Willis Stutson

Stutson, Willis; sales mgr. The Oldsmobile Co.; born, Lancaster, O., Jan. 28, 1884; son of Alverd and Emma Stutson; educated, Asheville schools, Asheville, N. C.; married, Pittsburgh, Pa., April 23, 1905, Ethel Crozier; issue, one daughter, Elizabeth Stutson; 1904-1905, special agt. New York Life Insurance Co., traveling out of Dayton, O.; 1905, 1906, 1907, has his own insurance business, writing general lines in Washington Court House, O.; 1909-1910, traveling salesman, out of Cleveland, for The White Co.; 1910-1911-1912, branch mgr. of The Winton Motor Carriage Co., at Columbus, 0.; at present sales mgr. for The Oldsmobile Co.; member B. P. O. E., Washington Court House, O., Lodge; member Automobile, and Advertising...

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Harry Lavitt

Sergt., Inf., Co. K, 22nd Inf. Born in Buncombe County; the son of Mr. and Mrs. D. L. Lavitt. Entered the service at Chicago, Ill., Nov. 1, 1916. Sent to Jefferson Barracks, Mo., then to Camp Douglas, then to Ft. Hamilton, Ellis Island, N. Y., Green Pt., Brooklyn, Syracuse, N. Y. Mustered out at Ft. Jay, N. Y., May 6, 1919. Now located at Asheville,...

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Where was Hernando de Soto’s Guaxale?

Guaxale was a Native American village visited by the Hernando de Soto Expedition in late spring of 1541. De Soto and his small army of conquistadors explored what was to become the Southeastern United States between the years 1539 and 1543. Despite the fact that de Soto’s men only visited Guaxale briefly, and the village was not large, it’s location has been a major focus for scholars, studying the earliest Spanish explorers. In North Carolina one suggested location of Guaxale has even been a key element of tourism promotion.

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Biltmore Mound, Asheville, North Carolina

During the 1980s American scholars suddenly became interested in Spain’s efforts to colonize the North America. For 200 years American history books had generally ignored the Spanish and French presence in North America prior to the English colonies winning their independence. Generations of students here were under the impression that no white man had set foot on the continent until brave Englishmen founded a short-lived colony on Roanoke Island, NC in 1585. Well, while all the history books were being printed in Boston, probably most students had the impression that the first colony was founded by the Pilgrims in...

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