Location: Anadarko Texas

Rosales, Manuel G. – Obituary

Manuel G. Rosales, 80, of Vancouver, Wash., a former longtime Baker County resident, died June 5, 2005. His memorial service will be at 11 a.m. Thursday at Evergreen Staples Funeral Chapel, 4700 N.E. St. Johns Blvd., at Vancouver, Wash. Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. choose a state: Any AL AK AZ AR CA CO CT DE DC FL GA HI ID IL IN IA KS KY LA ME MD MA MI MN MS MO MT NE NV NH NJ NM NY NC ND OH OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT VA WA WV WI WY INTL Start Now Manuel was born on Feb. 22, 1925, to Ben and Savina Rosales at Merkel City, Texas. He grew up in Anadarko, Okla., and attended school there. He entered the Civilian Conservation Corps camp in Oklahoma in 1941. In December 1943 he married his beloved wife of 61 years, Mary L. Castillo. They lived at Oklahoma City and then moved to Durkee with their family of six where they lived for 13 years. Manuel worked as a heavy equipment operator with Oregon-Portland Cement Co. and retired after 25 years. In 1963, Manuel and Mary moved to Baker City where they raised their six children. The moved to Vancouver, Wash., in 1995 where all their children resided. Manuel was fully involved with the...

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Anadarko Tribe

Anadarko Indians (from Nädä´ko, their own name). A tribe of the Caddo confederacy whose dialect was spoken by the Kadohadacho, Hainai and Adai.  The earliest mention of the people is in the relation of Biedma (1544); who writes that Moscoso in 1542 led his men during their southward march through a province that lay east of the Anadarko.  The territory occupied by the tribe was southwest of the Kadohadacho.  Their villages were scattered along Trinity and Brazos Rivers, Texas, higher up than those of the Hainai, and do not seem to have been visited so early as theirs by the French.  A Spanish mission was established among the Anadarko early in the 18th century, but was soon abandoned. La Harpe reached an Anadarko village in 1719, and was kindly received. The people shared in the general friendliness for the French. During the contentions of the latter with the Spaniards and later with the English, throughout the 18th century, the Anadarko suffered greatly. They became embroiled in tribal wars; their villages were abandoned; and those who survived the havoc of war and the new diseases brought into the country by the white people were forced to seek shelter and safety with their kindred toward the north east. In 1812 a village of 40 men and 200 souls was reported on Sabine River. The Anadarko lived in villages, having fixed habitations...

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