Location: Alachua County FL

Slave Narrative of Frank Berry

Interviewer: Pearl Randolph Person Interviewed: Frank Berry Location: Jacksonville, Florida Age: 78 Frank Berry, living at 1614 west Twenty-Second street, Jacksonville, Florida, claims to be a grandson of Osceola, last fighting chief of the Seminole tribe. Born in 1858 of a mother who was part of the human chattel belonging to one of the Hearnses of Alachua County in Florida, he served variously during his life as a State and Federal Government contractor, United States Marshal (1881), Registration Inspector (1879). Being only eight years of age when the Emancipation Proclamation was issued, he remembers little of his life as a slave. The master was kind in an impersonal way but made no provision for his freedmen as did many other Southerners–usually in the form of land grants–although he gave them their freedom as soon as the proclamation was issued. Berry learned from his elders that their master was a noted duelist and owned several fine pistols some of which have very bloody histories. It was during the hectic days that followed the Civil War that Berry served in the afore-mentioned offices. He held his marshalship under a Judge King of Jacksonville, Florida. As State and Federal Government Contractor he built many public structures, a few of which are still in use, among them the jetties at Mayport, Florida which he helped to build and a jail at High Springs,...

Read More

Oconee Indians

Oconee Tribe – Significance unknown. Oconee Connections. The Oconee belonged to the Muskhogean linguistic stock, and the Atcik-hata group. (See Apalachicola) Oconee Location. Just below the Rock Landing on Oconee River, Georgia. (see also Florida.) Oconee History. Early documents reveal at least two bodies of Indians bearing the name Oconee and probably related. One was on or near the coast of Georgia and seems later to have moved into the Apalachee country and to have become fused with the Apalachee tribe before the end of the seventeenth century. The other was at the point above indicated, on Oconee River. About 1685 they were on Chattahoochee River, whence they moved to the Rock Landing. A more northerly location for at least part of the tribe may be indicated in the name of a Cherokee town, though that may have been derived from a Cherokee word as Mooney supposed. About 1716 they moved to the east bank of the Chattahoochee in Stewart County, Georgia, and a few years later part went to the Alachua Plains, in the present Alachua County, Florida, where they became the nucleus of the Seminole Nation and furnished the chief to that people until the end of the Seminole war. Most of them were then taken to Oklahoma, but they had already lost their identity. Oconee Population. The following estimates of effective Oconee men in the Creek...

Read More

Potano Indians

Potano Tribe – Meaning unknown. Potano Connections. (See Utina) Potano Location. In the, territory of the present Alachua County. Potano Towns. The following places named in the De Soto narratives probably belonged to this tribe: Itaraholata or Ytara, Potano, Utinamocharra or Utinama, Cholupaha, and a town they called Mala-Paz. A letter dated 1602 mentions five towns, and on and after 1606, when missionaries reached the tribe, stations were established called San Francisco, San Miguel, Santa Anna, San Buenaventura, and San Martin(?). There is mention also of a mission station called Apalo. Potano History. The name Potano first appears as that of a province through which De Soto passed in 1539. In 1564-65 the French colonists of Florida found this tribe at war with the Utina and assisted the latter to win victory over them. After the Spaniards had supplanted the French, they also supported the Utina in wars between them and the Potano. In 1584 a Spanish captain sent to invade the Potano country was defeated and slain. A second expedition, however, killed many Indians and drove them from their town. In 1601 they asked to be allowed to return to it and in 1606 missionary work undertaken among them resulting in their conversion along with most of the other Timucua peoples. Their mission was known as San Francisco de Potano and it appears in the mission lists of...

Read More

Goodspeed, Hellen A. Fellers – Obituary

Hellen A. Goodspeed, 86, of Gainesville, Fla., formerly of Fort Dodge, died March 5, 1995 in Gainesville. Services will be 11 a.m. today at Bruce’s Funeral Home, Fort Dodge, with the Rev. David Feltman, pastor of First Presbyterian Church, officiating. Burial will be in North Lawn Cemetery in Fort Dodge. Visitation will be an hour prior to services today at the funeral home. Survivors include a daughter, Beverly Goins, Gainesville, Fla.; a son, Paul, Springfield, Mo.; eight grandchildren; 14 great grandchildren; and a brother, Edward Fellers, Fort Dodge. She was preceded in death by her parents, her husband, and a brother, Theron. Hellen Fellers was born June 16, 1908 in Oskaloosa. She graduated from Fort Dodge High School. She married James Goodspeed in the early 1930s in Fremont and the couple lived in Fort Dodge. She worked at Kresge in Fort Dodge, and later as a salesperson for Kmart in Fort Dodge. Her husband died in 1963 and she continued to live in Fort Dodge until 1986 when she moved to Gainesville, Fla., to be close to her daughter. She was a past member of the Presbyterian Church in Fort Dodge, and a past member of the Eastern Star in Fort Dodge. Memorials may be given to the American Lung Association. Contributed by: Shelli...

Read More

Alachua County Florida Cemetery Records

Florida Cemetery records are listed by county then name of cemetery within the Florida county. Most of these are complete indices at the time of transcription, however, in some cases we list the listing when it is only a partial listing Alachua County Cemetery Records Hosted at Alachua County Independent Genealogy Antioch Cemetery Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Antioch Cemetery Page 1 Page 2 Page3 Archer Cemetery Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Bethlehem Methodist Episcopal Cemetery Campbell Cemetery Carlton Cemetery Cason Cemetery Center Point Cemetery Davis Cemetery Dell Cemetery Evergreen Cemetery Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12 Page 13 Page 14 Page 15 Page 16 Page 17 Page 18 Page 19 Page 20 Page 21 Page 22 Page 23 Page 24 Page 25 Page 26 Page 27 Page 28 Page 29 Page 30 Page 31 Page 32 Page 33 Page 34 Page 35 Page 36 Page 37 Page 38 Page 39 Page 40 Page 41 Page 42 Fairbanks Cemetery Fairbanks Cemetery Forrest Grove Cemetery Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Hague Cemetery Hatchet Creek / Pons Cemetery Hawthorne Baptist Cemetery Hawthorne Cemetery Page...

Read More


Free Genealogy Archives

It takes a village to grow a family tree!
Genealogy Update - Keeping you up-to-date!
101 Best Websites 2016

Pin It on Pinterest