Collection: Tribal Genealogy Research

Tribal Genealogy Research

This series provides a collection of online resources specific to a tribe. It’s intention is to incorporate a larger collection of links to offsite content then what could be included from within the tribal page.

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Powhatan Indian Research

Powhatan Indians (Southern Renape pawd’tan, ‘falls in a current’ of water.-Gerard). A confederacy of Virginian Algonquian tribes. Their territory included the tidewater section of Virginia from the Potomac south to the divide between James River and Albemarle sound, and extended into the interior as far as the falls of the principal rivers about Fredericksburg and Richmond. They also occupied the Virginia counties east of Chesapeake Bay and possibly included some tribes in lower Maryland. In the Piedmont region west of them were the hostile Monacan and Manahoac, while on the south were the Chowanoc, Nottoway, and Meherrin of Iroquoian stock. Read more about the Powhatan History Archives, Libraries  and Genealogy Societies AccessGenealogy Library – Provides a listing of our on line books, books we own, and books we will be putting on line Genealogy Library – Read books online for Free! Powhatan Ranape Nation Museum PO Box 225 Rancocas, NJ 08073 Powhatan Indian Biographies Powhatan Chiefs Honorable Chief Powhatan, (hosted at Pauwau Virtual Museum) Chief Powhatan (hosted at Wikipedia) Openchancanough Pocahontas Biography (hosted Encyclopedia of World Biography) Bureau of Indian Affairs  Tracing your Indian Ancestors Tribal Leaders Directory Recognized Indian Entities, 10/2010 Update (PDF) Powhatan Indian Cemeteries Native American (Indian) Cemeteries Powhatan Indian Census Indians in the 11th (1890) Census of the United States Native American (Indian) Census Records US Indian Census Schedules 1885-1940 Powhatan Indian Church Records Powhatan...

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Potawatomi Indian Research

Potawatomi Indians (J. B. Bottineau, speaking Chippewa and Cree fluently, gives Potawatanubñk or Potawaganiñk, i. e. ‘People of the place of the fire,’ as the primary form of the name. This derivation is strongly confirmed by the Huron name Asistagueroüon (Champlain, 1616), for Otsistă’ge`roñnoñ’, likewise signifying ‘People of the place of fire,’ which was applied by them to their enemies who dwelt in 1616 on the west shores of Lake Huron. Read More about the Potawatomie History Potawatomi Indian Biography Pottawatomie Chiefs and Leaders Chief Kack-kack (hosted at Pottawatomie Web) Bureau of Indian Affairs Tracing your Indian Ancestors Tribal Leaders Directory Recognized Indian Entities, 10/2010 Update (PDF) Potawatomi Indian Cemeteries Native Americans at the Forest Home/German Waldheim Cemeteries (hosted at Franzosenbusch Heritage Society) Forest Home Cemetery (hosted at Graveyards of Chicago) Our Lady of Snows, Potawatomi Indian Catholic Shrine (Kansas) Shipshee Cemetery (Kansas) Chief Menominee’s Camp Burial Ground, Cass County Indiana (hosted at Cemeteries of Cass County IN) Rushlake Potawatomi Indian Cemetery (Michigan) Indian Burial Ground (Indiana) Sacred Heart Mission Old Indian Burial Grounds Photos (Michigan) Potawatomi Indian Census 1910 Missaukee County Census (hosted at Missaukee County, Michigan, MIGenWeb) Potawatomi Indian Culture/Customs Pottawatomie Indian Gentes Federally Recognized Tribes Kansas Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation 16281 Q Road Mayetta, KS 66509 Tribal History Language Family History Member Services (Enrollment) Michigan Pokegnek Bodewadmik Pokagon Band of Potawatomi 58620 Sink Road or Box...

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Nez Perce Indian Research

Nez Percé Indians (‘pierced noses’) A term applied by the French to a number of tribes which practiced or were supposed to practice the custom of piercing the nose for the insertion of a piece of dentalium.  The term is now used exclusively to designate the main tribe of the Shahaptian family, who have not, however, so far as is known ever been given to the practice. Read more about the Nez Percé History. Nez Percé Indian Biography Nez Percé Indian Chiefs and Leaders Jackson Sundown Chief Joseph (hosted at Indigenous Peoples History) Chief Joseph – Leader of the Nez Perce and a True American (hosted at Legends of America) Bureau of Indian Affairs A Guide to Tracing your Indian Ancestry(PDF) Tribal Leaders Directory Recognized Indian Entities, 10/2010 Update (PDF) Nez Percé Indian Cemeteries Maggie Williams Cemetery (hosted at Ewanida Rail Records) Native American Cemeteries (hosted at AccessGenealogy) Nez Percé Indian Census Free US Indian Census Rolls 1885-1940 Native American Census Records Indians in the 11th (1890) Census of the United States US Indian Census Schedules 1885-1940 (Ancestry) Nez Percé Indian Culture/Customs Housing types Federally Recognized Tribes Nez Percé Nation P.O. Box 365 Lapwai, ID 83540 Reservation and Location Genealogy Help Pages Proving Your Indian Ancestry Indian Genealogy DNA- Testing for your Native American Ancestry How to Write a Genealogical Query Nez Percé Indian History Nez Percé Indian History...

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Navajo Indian Research

Navaho Indians ( pron. Na’-va-ho, from Tewa Navahú, the name referring to a large area of cultivated lands; applied to a former Tewa pueblo, and, by extension, to the Navaho, known to the Spaniards of the 17th century as Apaches de Navajo, who intruded on the Tewa domain or who lived in the vicinity, to distinguish them front other “Apache” bands.—Hewett in Am. Anthrop., viii,193,1906. Fray Alonso Benavides, in his Memorial of 1630, gives the earliest translation of the tribal name, in the form Nauajó, ‘sementeras grandes’—’great seed-sowings’, or ‘great fields’.  Read more about the Navaho History. Navajo Indian Biographies Manuelito, Navajo War Chief Bureau of Indian Affairs A Guide to Tracing your Indian Ancestry (PDF) Tribal Leaders Directory Recognized Indian Entities, 10/2010 Update (PDF) Navajo Indian Cemeteries Native American (Indian) Cemeteries, Navajo Indian Census Free US Indian Census Rolls 1885-1940 Indians in the 11th (1890) Census of the United States Indian Census Records US Indian Census Schedules 1885-1940 – Ancestry.com Navajo Census Records 1884-1940, (hosted at Diné (The “People”) Family History of Harrison Lapahie Jr.) Navajo Indian Clans Navajo Diné Clans (hosted at Diné (The “People”) Family History of Harrison Lapahie Jr.) Federally Recognized Tribes Navajo Nation– Official Website of the Nation P.O. Box 9000 Willow Rock, AZ 86515 Navajo History Navajo Visitors Guide Culture Genealogy Help Pages Proving Your Indian Ancestry Indian Genealogy DNA- Testing for your...

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Kiowa Indian Research

Kiowa Indians (from Gǎ’-i-gwŭ, or Kǎ’-i-gwŭ, ‘principal people,’ their own name). A tribe at one time residing about. the upper Yellowstone and Missouri, but better known as centering about the upper Arkansas and Canadian in Colorado and Oklahoma, and constituting, so far as present knowledge goes, a distinct linguistic stock. Read more about the Kiowa Tribe History Libraries AccessGenealogy Library – Provides a listing of our on line books, books we own, and books we will be putting on line Genealogy Library – Read books online for Free! Kiowa Indian Biographies Kiowa Indian Chiefs and Leaders (hosted at AccessGenealogy) Big Tree – Kiowa Chief, (hosted at Encyclopedia Of Oklahoma History and Culture) Dohäsan – Kiowa Chief (hosted at United States History) Kicking Bird – Kiowa Chief, (hosted at Encyclopedia Of Oklahoma History and Culture) Lone Wolf – Kiowa Chief (hosted at Encyclopedia Of Oklahoma History and Culture) Maman-Ti – Kiowa Medicine Man (hosted at Texas State Historical Association) Satanta (White Bear) – Kiowa Chief (hosted at Wikipedia) Satank (Sitting Bear) – Kiowa Chief (hosted at Wikipedia) Tohausen – Kiowa Chief  (hosted at Smithsonian American Art Museum) Bureau of Indian Affairs A Guide to Tracing your Indian Ancestry(PDF) Tribal Leaders Directory Recognized Indian Entities, 10/2010 Update (PDF) Kiowa Indian Cemeteries Native American Cemeteries (hosted at AccessGenealogy) Old Rainy Mountain Indian Mission Cemetery (hosted at Rebelcherokee’s History and Genealogy Sites) Saddle...

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Hopi Indian Research

Hopi (contraction of Hópitu, ‘peaceful ones,’ or Hópitu-shínumu, ‘peaceful all people’: their own name). A body of Indians, speaking a Shoshonean dialect, occupying 6 pueblos on a reservation of 2,472,320 acres in north east Arizona. The name “Moqui,” or “Moki,” by which they have been popularly known, means ‘dead’ in their own language, but as a tribal name it is seemingly of alien origin and of undetermined signification—perhaps from the Keresan language (Mósi(cha in Laguna, Mo-ts in Acoma, Mótsi( in Sia, Cochiti, and San Felipe), whence Espejo’s “Mohace” and “Mohoce” (1583) and Oñate’s “Mohoqui (1598). Bandelier and Cushing believed the Hopi country, the later province of Tusayan, to be identical with the Totonteac of Fray Marcos de Niza. Archives, Libraries, and Societies AccessGenealogy Library – Provides a listing of our on line books, books we own, and books we will be putting on line. Genealogy Library – Read books online for Free! Hopi Indian Biography Native American Biographies Chief Dan Evehema (hosted at Wolf Lodge) Bureau of Indian Affairs A Guide to Tracing your Indian Ancestry(PDF) Tribal Leaders Directory Recognized Indian Entities, 10/2010 Update (PDF) Hopi Indian Cemeteries Native American (Indian) Cemeteries, by State Hopi Cemeteries (hosted at University of Wisconsin, Eau Claire) Scattered Graves Wooden Crosses Stones on Graves Graves with Icons Hopi Indian Census 1900 Indian Territory Census (hosted at Ancestry.com) Indians in the 11th (1890) Census...

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Crow Indian Research

Crow (trans., through French gens des corbeaux, of their own name, Absároke, crow, sparrow hawk, or bird people). A Siouan tribe forming part of the Hidatsa group, their separation from the Hidatsa having taken place, as Matthews (1894) believed, within the last 200 years. Hayden, following their tradition, placed it about 1776. According to this story it was the result of a factional dispute between two chiefs who were desperate men and nearly equal in the number of their followers. Archives, Libraries and Genealogy Societies AccessGenealogy Library – Provides a listing of our on line books, books we own, and books we will be putting on line Genealogy Library – Read books online for Free! Little Big Horn College Library Crow Indian Biographies Joe Medicine Crow (hosted at Wikipedia) Chief Plenty Coups (hosted at Western Treasures) James Pierson Beckwourth (hosted at Find a Grave) Crow King (hosted at CusterLives) White Man Runs Him Hairy Moccasin Robert Yellowtail (hosted at Little Big Horn College Library) Bureau of Indian Affairs A Guide to Tracing your Indian Ancestry(PDF) Tribal Leaders Directory Recognized Indian Entities, 10/2010 Update (PDF) Crow Indian Census Records 1900 Indian Territory Census (hosted at Ancestry.com) Crow Census Data Base (hosted at Little Big Horn College Library) Indians in the 11th (1890) Census of the United States US Indian Census Schedules 1885-1940 Crow Indian Cemetery Records Native American (Indian) Cemeteries,...

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Creek Indian Research

Creek Indians, A confederacy forming the largest division of the Muskhogean family.  They received their name form the English on account of the numerous streams in their country.  During early historic times the Creek occupied the greater portion of Alabama and Georgia, residing chiefly on Coosa and Tallapoosa rivers, the two largest tributaries of the Alabama river and on the Flint and Chattahoochee Rivers.  Read more about the Creek Tribe History. Creek Indian Biography Creek Indian Chiefs and Leaders Benjamin Hawkins (hosted at About North Georgia) Opothleyaholo Bureau of Indian Affairs  A Guide to Tracing your Indian Ancestry(PDF) Tribal Leaders Directory Recognized Indian Entities, 10/2010 Update (PDF) Creek Indian Cemeteries Indian Cemeteries Creek Indian Census 1832 Creek Nation, Alabama Census, otherwise known as the: Parsons and Abbott Roll 1835 Cherokee Census East of the Mississippi, otherwise known as the: Henderson Roll 1860 Federal Census Indian Territory (hosted at Indian Territory Archives) Page 1 Page 2 Slave Census Page 1 Slave Census Page 2 Slave Census Page 3 Slave Census Page 4 Slave Census Page 5 1860 Creek Nation census, Free inhabitants (hosted at Creek Indian Researcher) Pages 1-4 Pages 5-8 Pages 9-12 Pages 13-15 No surname Surnames A-L Surnames M-Y 1860 Census of the 1832 Creek Orphans (hosted at Creek Indian Researcher) Part 1 Part 2 Part 3 Part 4 1863 Refugee Creek & Euchee Indian Census (hosted at...

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Cree Indian Research

Cree (contracted from Kristinaux, French form of Kenistenoag, given as one of their own names). An important Algonquian tribe of British America whose former habitat was in Manitoba and Assiniboin, between Red and Saskatchewan rivers. They ranged northeastward down Nelson river to the vicinity of Hudson Bay, and northwestward almost to Athabasca lake. Archives and Libraries Archives and Libraries of Canada Aboriginal Research and Services AccessGenealogy Library – Provides a listing of our on line books, books we own, and books we will be putting on line Genealogy Library – Read books online for Free! Cree Indian Biographies Native American Biographies Bureau of Indian Affairs A Guide to Tracing your Indian Ancestry(PDF) Tribal Leaders Directory Recognized Indian Entities, 10/2010 Update (PDF) Cree Indian Cemeteries Indian Cemeteries Cree Indian Census Indians in the 11th (1890) Census of the United States Native American (Indian) Cemeteries, by State Cree Indian Culture/Customs Cree Culture and Customs (hosted at Cree Nation Culture) Federally Recognized Chippewa Cree Tribe of Rocky Boy Montana 81 Mission Taylor Rd. Box Elder, MT 59521 History Cultural Preservation Cree Communities, Canada Cree Nation of Chisasibi P.O. box 150 Chisasibi, Quebec, Canada J)M 1E0 Cree Nation of Eastmain 76 Nouchimi or P.O. Box 90 Eastmain, Quebec J0M 1W0 About Eastmain Cree Nation of Mistissini Isaac Shecapio Ar. Administration Building 187 Main Street Mistissini, Quebec, Canada G0W 1C0 Cree Nation of Nemaska...

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Comanche Indian Research

Comanche. One of the southern tribes of the Shoshonean stock, and the only one of that group living entirely on the plains. Their language and traditions show that they are a comparatively recent offshoot from the Shoshoni of Wyoming, both tribes speaking practically the same dialect and, until very recently, keeping up constant and friendly communication. Archives, Libraries  and Societies Societies Oklahoma Historical Society American Indian Land Records, Research Guide (PDF) Removal, 1830-1862 Comanche Oklahoma Genealogical Society United States Court – Indian Territory Comanche Indian Biographies Native American Biographies Quana Parker The Story of Quanah Parker (hosted at Murray County Oklahoma OKGenWeb) I-Satai and Family (hosted at RebelCherokee) Towasi/Toshaway (Silver Broach) Parra-Wa-Sa-Men (Ten Bears) Quanah (Fragrance) Bureau of Indian Affairs A Guide to Tracing your Indian Ancestry(PDF) Tribal Leaders Directory Recognized Indian Entities, 10/2010 Update (PDF) Comanche Indian Cemeteries Otipoby Cemetery (hosted at Oklahoma Cemeteries) Indian Cemeteries Comanche Indian Census Free US Indian Census Rolls 1885-1940 Ancestry – US Indian Census Schedules 1885-1940 1900 Indian Territory Census  $$ (hosted at Ancestry.com) Indian Census Records Indians in the 11th (1890) Census of the United States Federal Recognized Tribes Comanche Tribe of Oklahoma 584 NW Bingo Rd. Lawton, OK 73507 Enrollment Form Historic Preservation Genealogy Help Pages Proving Your Indian Ancestry Indian Genealogy DNA- Testing for your Native American Ancestry How to Write a Genealogical Query Comanche Indian History Following hosted...

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Choctaw Indian Research

Choctaw (possibly a corruption of the Spanish chcdu, ‘flat’ or ‘flattened,’ alluding to the custom of these Indians of flattening the head). An important tribe of the Muskhogean stock, formerly occupying middle and south Mississippi, their territory extending, in their most flourishing days, for some distance east of Tombigbee River, probably as far as Dallas County, Ga. Ethnically they belong to the Choctaw branch of the Muskhogean family, which included the Choctaw, Chickasaw, Hunt and their allies, and some small tribes which formerly lived along Yazoo River. Archives, Libraries and Genealogy Societies Societies Oklahoma Historical Society Indian Archives Holdings Summary Oklahoma Genealogical Society United States Court – Indian Territory 1890 Census – Indian Territory, Old Towson County, Choctaw Nation Choctaw Indian Biography Choctaw Chiefs Pushmataha – Tribal Chief (Push-ma-ta-ha) Peter P. Pitchlynn Allen Wright (hosted at Native American Resources) Mushalatubee(hosted at Native American Resources) Peter Perkins Pitchlynn(hosted at Native American Resources) Choctaw Chiefs (hosted at Choctaw Nation) The Life of Okah Tubbee Bureau of Indian Affairs A Guide to Tracing your Indian Ancestry(PDF) Tribal Leaders Directory Recognized Indian Entities, 10/2010 Update (PDF) Choctaw Indian Cemeteries Mount Tabor Indian Cemetery -Texas (hosted at Paul and Dottie Ridenour’s Home Page) Indian Cemeteries (hosted at Accessgenealogy) Choctaw Indian Census 1860 Federal Census Choctaw Nation, Indian Territory (hosted at Indian Nations, OKGenWeb Archives) Choctaw, Part 1 Choctaw, Part 2 1885 Choctaw Census (Original...

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Chippewa Indians Research

Chippewa (popular adaptation of Ojibway, ‘to roast till puckered up,’ referring, to the puckered seam on their moccasins; from ojib ‘to pucker up,’ ub-way ‘to roast’). One of the largest tribes North of Mexico, whose range was formerly along both shores of Lake Huron and Superior, extending across Minnesota Turtle Mountains, North Dakota. Read More.. Chippewa Indian Biographies William Edward Davis III (1873-1940) (hosted at USGenWeb Project) Harry J. Haynes Bureau of Indian Affairs Tracing your Indian Ancestors Tribal Leaders Directory Recognized Indian Entities, 10/2010 Update (PDF) Chippewa Indian Cemeteries Following (hosted at USGenWeb Project) Tombstones at the Catholic Cemetery, Peshawbestown, MI Index to Assinins Cemetery Tombstones, Baraga County, Michigan Assinins Cemetery Tombstones Photos, Baraga County, Michigan Indian Cemeteries Chippewa Indian Cemetery, Birch Run, Michigan (hosted at Saginaw County Michigan Photographs) Indian Cemetery, Union Township, Isabella County, Michigan (hosted at Isabella County, MiGenWeb) Chippewa Indian Census 1836 Mixed-Blood census of the Chippewa Indians in the 11th (1890) Census of the United States Native American (Indian) Cemeteries, by State Native Americans in the 1880 Federal Census ~ Antrim County 1904 Taggart Census Roll Potawatomi of Michigan – Surnames Native Americans  in the 1910 Federal Census – Antrim County 1910 Missaukee County Census Indian Population (compiled by Donna Hoff-Grambau) 1901 Census Of Manitoulin Island 1880 Mason County, Michigan Census of Native Americans Mason County 1860 Native American Census 1870 Census, 1908...

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Chinook Indian Research

Chinook Indians (from Tsinúk, their Chehalis name). The best-known tribe of the Chinookan family. They claimed the territory on the north side of Columbia River, Wash., from the mouth to Grays bay, a distance of about 15 miles, and north along the seacoast as far as the north part of Shoalwater bay, where they were met by the Chehalis, a Salish tribe. The Chinook were first described by Lewis and Clark, who visited them in 1805, though they had been known to traders for at least 12 years previously. Read more about Chinook History Chinook Indian Biographies Native American Biographies Chinook Chiefs Chief Comcomly and Chief Coboway  (hosted at The Columbia River) Celiast and Ilchee Bureau of Indian Affairs A Guide to Tracing your Indian Ancestry(PDF) Tribal Leaders Directory Recognized Indian Entities, 10/2010 Update (PDF) Chinook Indian Cemeteries Comcomly’s Tomb (hosted at Discovering Lewis & Clark) Indian Cemetery Records Chinook Indian Census Free US Indian Census Rolls 1885-1940 Indian Census Records Indians in the 11th (1890) Census of the United States US Indian Census Schedules 1885-1940 Chinook Indian Culture/Customs Chinookan Culture (hosted at The Virtual Meier Site) Chinookan Material Culture Village Life Longhouse Tradition Federal and State Recognized Tribes Chinook Indian Nation  (Clatsop, Cathlamet, Wahkiakum, Willapa, Lower Chinook) P.O. Box 368 or 3 E. Park Street Bay Center, WA 98527 Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians 201 S.E. Swan Avenue...

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Chickasaw Indian Research

Chickasaw Indians. An important Muskhogean tribe, closely related to the Choctaw in language and customs, although the two tribes were mutually hostile. Aside from tradition, the earliest habitat traceable for the Chickasaw is north Mississippi. Their villages in the 18th century centered about Pontotoc and Union counties, where the headwaters of the Tombigbee meet those of Yazoo river and its affluent, the Tallahatchie, about where the De Soto narratives place them in 1540, under the name Chicaza. Read more about Chickasaw Tribe History. Archives, Libraries  and Genealogy Societies AccessGenealogy Library – Provides a listing of our on line books, books we own, and books we will be putting on line Genealogy Library – Read books online for Free! Chickasaw Historical Society (hosted at Chickasaw Nation) Chickasaw Indian Biographies Following (hosted at Chronicles of Oklahoma) Governor Cyrus Harris Governor Daughtery Winchester Colbert Benjamin Franklin Overton Benjamin Crooks Burney William Leander Byrd Bureau of Indian Affairs A Guide to Tracing your Indian Ancestry(PDF) Tribal Leaders Directory Recognized Indian Entities, 10/2010 Update (PDF) Chickasaw Indian Cemeteries Chickasaw Indian Graves Cemetery, Pittsburg County, Oklahoma (hosted at Oklahoma Genealogical Society) Anderson Cemetery, Chickasaw Indians, Pittsburg County, OK (hosted at OKGenWeb) Indian Cemeteries (hosted at AccessGenealogy) Chickasaw Indian Burial Ground, Bryan County OK (hosted at Find A Grave) Chickasaw Indian Census Native American Census Records (hosted at Native American Genealogy) Indians in the 11th (1890)...

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