Collection: Indian Tribes of North America

Linguistic Families of American Indians North of Mexico

Swanton’s The Indian Tribes of North America is a classic example of early 20th Century Native American ethnological research. Published in 1953 in Bulletin 145 of the Bureau of American Ethnology, this manuscript covers all known Indian tribes broken down by location (state). AccessGenealogy’s online presentation provides state pages by which the user is then either provided a brief history of the tribe, or is referred to a more in-depth ethnological representation of the tribe and it’s place in history. This ethnology usually contains the various names by which the tribe was known, general locations of the tribe, village names, brief history, population statistics for the tribe, and then connections in which the tribe is noted.

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Yavapai Indians

Yavapai Indians. According to the Handbook of American Indians (Hodge, 1907, 1910), from enyaéva, “sun,” and pai, “people,” and thus signifying “people of the sun,” but the southeastern...

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Papago Indians

Papago Indians. Signifying “bean people,” from the native words paphh, “beans,” and  óotam, “people.” Also called: Saikinne, Si’-ke-na, Apache name for Pima, Papago, and Maricopa....

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Clatsop Indians

Clatsop Indians. The Clatsop centered about Cape Adams, on the south side of Columbia River, extending up the latter as far as Tongue Point and southward on the Pacific coast to Tillamook Head.

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