Collection: Indian Schools Seminaries and Asylums

Children Transferred to Chilocco School, 1885-1902

This series includes originals of Form 5-138 describing children transferred from an agency to Chilocco Indian School. The statement is signed by the agent and certified by the physician of the home agency of the children. Information about children includes Indian name, English name, blood degree, nation, band, father’s name and rank, whether parents are living or dead, child’s sex, age, height, weight, and remarks.

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Indian Schools, Seminaries, and Asylums

Beginning in 1878 the goal was to assimilate Indian people into the general population of the United States. By placing the Indian children in first day schools and boarding schools it was thought this would be accomplished. Federal policy sanctioned the removal of children from their families and placed in government run boarding schools. It was thought they would become Americanized while being kept away from their traditional families. This collection of data focuses on providing the details – names, tribal affiliation, ages, and other data to specifically identify the Native children who boarded, institutionalized, and sometimes died in these “schools.”

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1910 Census of Fort Shaw Industrial Indian School

Fort Shaw Industrial Indian Boarding School opened in 1891 in Montana. It was discontinued 30 June 1910, due to declining enrollment. In 1904, it had a famous girls’ basketball team that barnstormed its way to St. Louis playing basketball and performing, and won the “World Championship” at the 1904 St. Louis World’s Fair. This census was requested by the Department of the Interior for a listing of all the Indians enrolled at Fort Shaw Indian School for June 1910 in answer to Circular #448. Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. choose a state: Any AL AK AZ AR CA CO CT DE DC FL GA HI ID IL IN IA KS KY LA ME MD MA MI MN MS MO MT NE NV NH NJ NM NY NC ND OH OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT VA WA WV WI WY INTL Start Now Key to Relation Father – F    Mother – M Sister – S    Brother – B Aunt – A    Uncle -U Guardian – G NameAgeFamily RelationTribeResidence Adams, Matthew20No RecordGros VentreHarlan, Montana Adams, Fanny15No RecordGros VentreHarlan, Montana Adams, Daisy6M, Mrs. L. AdamsGros VentreHarlan, Montana Arrowtope, Silas19PieganBrowning, Montana Archambeau, David18M, Mrs. A. VollinSiouxFrasier, Montana Anderson, John14F, Chas. AndersonCreeBrowning, Montana Anderson, Alice11F, Chas. AndersonCreeBrowning, Montana Anderson, Viola9F, Chas. AndersonCreeBrowning, Montana Allein, Mary6G, Pat LaFromboiseChippewaAnaconda, Montana Allein, Marion7G, Pat LaFromboiseChippewaAnaconda, Montana...

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Canton Asylum, 1910, List of Patients

In 1898, Congress passed a bill creating the only ‘Institution for Insane Indians’ in the United States. The Canton Indian Insane Asylum, South Dakota (sometimes called Hiawatha Insane Asylum) opened for the reception of patients in January, 1903. Many of the inmates were not mentally ill. Native Americans risked being confined in the asylum for alcoholism, opposing government or business interests, or for being culturally misunderstood. A 1927 investigation conducted by the Bureau of Indian Affairs determined that a large number of patients showed no signs of mental illness. The asylum was closed in 1934. While open, more than...

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Canton Asylum, 1911 List of Patients

In 1898, Congress passed a bill creating the only ‘Institution for Insane Indians’ in the United States. The Canton Indian Insane Asylum, South Dakota (sometimes called Hiawatha Insane Asylum) opened for the reception of patients in January, 1903. Many of the inmates were not mentally ill. Native Americans risked being confined in the asylum for alcoholism, opposing government or business interests, or for being culturally misunderstood. A 1927 investigation conducted by the Bureau of Indian Affairs determined that a large number of patients showed no signs of mental illness. The asylum was closed in 1934. While open, more than 350 patients were detained there, in terrible conditions. At least 121 died. Land was set aside for a cemetery, but the Indian Office decided that stone markers for graves would be an unwarranted expense. Today, the cemetery (121 names) is located in the middle of a golf course in Canton. No one knows the cause of death of the incarcerated or why they were even at the asylum. The National Park Service has recently added the cemetery to the National Register of Historic Places. This page covers all patients interred in Canton Asylum during the year of 1911. June 28, 1911 Patients NameAgeSexFamily Relationship Antone40MaleWidower Bigmane, Joseph24MaleSingle Blue Sky66FemaleMarried Brien, Jule42MaleMarried Brings-the-Arrow, John47MaleMarried Brown, John44MaleMarried Crane, Lucy80FemaleWidower Danachonginiwa64MaleMarried Davis, Eliza L.35FemaleUnknown Deere, Amos62MaleMarried Gladstone, Lucy L. 32FemaleMarried Eldridge, Emily, 50FemaleMarried...

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Canton Indian Asylum, 1924 Male Patients

In 1898, Congress passed a bill creating the only ‘Institution for Insane Indians’ in the United States. The Canton Indian Insane Asylum, South Dakota (sometimes called Hiawatha Insane Asylum) opened for the reception of patients in January, 1903. Many of the inmates were not mentally ill. Native Americans risked being confined in the asylum for alcoholism, opposing government or business interests, or for being culturally misunderstood. A 1927 investigation conducted by the Bureau of Indian Affairs determined that a large number of patients showed no signs of mental illness. The asylum was closed in 1934. While open, more than 350 patients were detained there, in terrible conditions. At least 121 died. Land was set aside for a cemetery, but the Indian Office decided that stone markers for graves would be an unwarranted expense. Today, the cemetery (121 names) is located in the middle of a golf course in Canton. No one knows the cause of death of the incarcerated or why they were even at the asylum. The National Park Service has recently added the cemetery to the National Register of Historic Places. This page covers the male patients interred in Canton Asylum during the year of 1924. June 1924 Male Patients NumberNameTribeReservationState 1Bear, FrankNavajoNavajoArizona 2Black Bull, JamesSiouxRosebudSouth Dakota 3Brown, JohnSiouxSanteeNebraska 4Carpenter, JosephSiouxCheyenneSouth Dakota 5Catron, KeeNavajoNavajoArizona 6Charley, CreepingPiuteNevadaNevada 7Clafflin, PeterMenomineeKeshenaWisconsin 8Cox, John CharlesOmahaOmahaNebraska 9Davis, GeorgeCreekMuskogeeOklahoma 10Dayea, WillieNavajoNavajoArizona 11Fairbanks, RichardChippewaLeach...

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Canton Indian Asylum, 1924 Female Patients

In 1898, Congress passed a bill creating the only ‘Institution for Insane Indians’ in the United States. The Canton Indian Insane Asylum, South Dakota (sometimes called Hiawatha Insane Asylum) opened for the reception of patients in January, 1903. Many of the inmates were not mentally ill. Native Americans risked being confined in the asylum for alcoholism, opposing government or business interests, or for being culturally misunderstood. A 1927 investigation conducted by the Bureau of Indian Affairs determined that a large number of patients showed no signs of mental illness. The asylum was closed in 1934. While open, more than 350 patients were detained there, in terrible conditions. At least 121 died. Land was set aside for a cemetery, but the Indian Office decided that stone markers for graves would be an unwarranted expense. Today, the cemetery (121 names) is located in the middle of a golf course in Canton. No one knows the cause of death of the incarcerated or why they were even at the asylum. The National Park Service has recently added the cemetery to the National Register of Historic Places. This page covers the female patients interred in Canton Asylum during the year of 1924. June 1924 Female Patients NumberNameTribeReservationState 1Agusta, JoannaPapagoSellsArizona 2Ambrose, VivianColvilleSpokaneWashington 3Amour, ChristineMenomineeKeshenaWisconsin 4Amyotte, EmmaChippewaTurtle MountainNorth Dakota 5Bite, RosaBlackfeetBlackfeetMontana 6Blanchard, MaggieChippewaHaywardWisconsin 7Caldwell, AgnesMenomineeKeshenaWisconsin 8Canoe, KateWinnebagoGrand RapidsWisconsin 9Chavez, LilliamPuebloLagunaNew Mexico 10Chico, MariePapagoSellsArizona 11Dauphinais, MadelineChippewaTurtle...

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1924 Bloomfield Seminary Student List

In the fall of 1847, John Harpole Carr was appointed him to superintend the construction of buildings known afterward as “Bloomfield Academy,” in the Choctaw Nation. He was afterward appointed superintendent of the school. This establishment of the first missionary boarding school for girls among the Chickasaws. The Board contributed one third and the Nation two thirds of all the money used for the current expenses of the school. There never was any average attendance calculated for we always kept our number filled, whether it was twenty-five, thirty-five, forty-five or sixty. Whenever there was a vacancy through sickness or any other cause for any length of time, another was waiting to step in. The trustees were the superintendent of missions, the Rev. John Harrell on behalf of the Church, and two Chickasaws on behalf of the Nation. Following the firing on Fort Sumpter, the whole South was in arms, and many of the fathers of our girls enlisted. Their first act was to take their daughters home. So, in May of that scholastic year, Bloomfield Academy, as it had been, was no more. (Chronicles of Oklahoma) 1924 Bloomfield Seminary Student List NameTribePost Office Alberson, Agnes Chickasaw Stonewall, Oklahoma Allison, Vadare Chickasaw Stonewall, Oklahoma Atkins, Hattie Chickasaw Franks, Oklahoma Boheer, Dorothy Chickasaw Pittsburg, Oklahoma Boheer, Ursula Chickasaw Pittsburg, Oklahoma Bostwick, Willie Dell Chickasaw Woodville, Oklahoma Brown, Angle Chickasaw Sulphur, Oklahoma Brown....

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