Collection: Genealogies

Bender Ancestors

The bulk of the Bender family in this country has come to be identified with that group of early Americans known as the “Pennsylvania Dutch”. The early English settlers coined this term and although they really meant to say “Deutsch”, meaning German, the word soon became corrupted into “Dutch”. They applied this name to those German, Swiss and even French Huguenots who had arrived here in the 1700’s and settled first in that small area roughly defined as south-central and eastern Pennsylvania.

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Richard Dexter Genealogy, 1642-1904

Being a history of the descendants of Richard Dexter of Malden, Massachusetts, from the notes of John Haven Dexter and original researches. Richard Dexter, who was admitted an inhabitant of Boston (New England), Feb. 28, 1642, came from within ten miles of the town of Slane, Co. Meath, Ireland, and belonged to a branch of that family of Dexter who were descendants of Richard de Excester, the Lord Justice of Ireland. He, with his wife Bridget, and three or more children, fled to England from the great Irish Massacre of the Protestants which commenced Oct. 27, 1641. When Richard Dexter and family left England and by what vessel, we are unable to state, but he could not have remained there long, as we know he was living at Boston prior to Feb. 28, 1642.

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Genealogy of the Yeargan Family 1730-1890

By the personal efforts of Leonidas Hilary Yeargan and Hilary H. L. Yeargan, two second cousins, who are great-grandsons of the original Rev. Andrew Yeargan, these memoirs have been obtained. The descent in this manuscript starts with Rev. Andrew Yeargan, who came from Wales about the year 1735 and settled in Virginia, ministering in the Roanoke and James River Valley. He married Ony Bowles and raised 10 sons and 1 daughter, namely: Andrew Yeargan, settled in South Carolina and raised two children, who’s identity is lost. John Yeargan,resided in Newbury County SC and raised two sons: John and Wiley....

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Bartlett Family Genealogy

Typing on six onion skinned papers, Ralph Sylvester Bartlett presented his lineage in the early 1900’s. His Bartlett family were early pioneers in Kittery Maine in the section later known as Eliot Maine. Whether he ever meant to compile these pages into book form is left for you to interpret, but somebody did eventually compile the 6 pages they had of his family tree. We provide the entire 6 pages in digital format below the transcription.

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Ralph Bacon Genealogy

The Bacon Family Genealogy descends the Bacon family tree through the children of Ralph Bacon, 2nd. Ralph was born in New York State abt the year 1777. At the age of 17, about the year 1794, he traveled to Painesville Ohio. Eventually acquiring some land there, he would marry Mary Jourden in 1801. In 1820 he moved his family to Crawford County, Ohio, owning houses and land in the townships of Liberty and Whetstone. His wife died 5 Oct 1845, he died 15 Jun 1849. This union would produce 13 offspring, twelve of whom would marry and raise families of their own. This Bacon Family Genealogy is their story.

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History Of The Gaines Family

This chapter will be of interest only to the Gaineses who are descended from James Gaines and his wife, who was Margaret Clore before her marriage to him. But since these will number quite a few the author has felt justified in devoting some space in his book to a chapter on his grand-mother, Margaret Clore Gaines. Michael Clore, sometimes called “Big Michael” because he was such a large man, was born in Culpepper or Madison County, Virginia, Dec. 4, 1746. He died Dec. 7, 1817. He was a gunsmith and cabinet maker by trade and contracted to make 12,000 stand of arms for General Washington-in the Revolutionary War. During this war the British captured his shops, and he was forced to run to prevent his own capture. He went with General Washington’s army after his shops, were captured as a gun repairer and gun tinker. He was a member of the Baptist church and a Freemason. Tradition says he was present at the initiation, passing and raising of General LaFayette in General Washington’s Army Lodge. After the war was over he held the meetings of his lodge in an upper room of his own log house until better quarters could be obtained. I allude here to an old letter of John Fishback, the administrator of his estate, which gives the names of his 15 children and number of...

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Descendants of Robert and Ruth Huestis

Robert1 Huestis 1Data (from records) submitted by Bertha S. (Huestis) Dearling (Mrs. H. D.), direct descendant of Robert Huestis, brother of Michael. Address: West 3127 Alice Ave., Spokane, Wash. Data also submitted by Thos. B. Huestis, Fletcher Trust Bldg., Indianapolis, Indiana. , married Ruth d. soon after the birth of his only child, David. Probably lived in Dutchess County, N. Y. * David Huestis. David2 Huestis, son of Robert; m. Elizabeth Wooley in Dutchess County, N. Y. After the Revolutionary War, in which he was a soldier, David Huestis moved to Herkimer County, N. Y., where he raised his seven children: Robert Huestis, b. May 7, 1760; d. Aug. 17, 1835 ; m. Margaret Griggs. Abel m. Cynthia Gordinier (sister of Margaret). Rachel Huestis. Edward Huestis. Eleanor Huestis. Michael Huestis. Lydia Huestis. Abel Huestis. Michael3 Huestis, b. Aug. 8, 1772; m. at Kinderhook, Columbia County, N. Y., Margaret (called Peggy) Gordinier, who was b. Jan. 3, 1773 ; she d. Feb. 24, 1823,; her mother’s maiden name was Holmes. Michael Huestis came to Rodman, N. Y., in 1810, from Warren, Herkimer County, N. Y.; he settled in the northern part of the town where he engaged in farming; he served as Justice of the Peace for many years, and was in the mercantile business in Rodman. He d. May 8, 1849; both he and his wife are buried at Rodman. Children (11): Hannah Huestis, b....

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The Descendants of Daniel and Hannah Edwards of Coventry CT

The following short genealogy has been transcribed from The Descendants of Rufus Edwards and His Wife Ruth Huestis Edwards: A Genealogical Record, by Jennie Melissa Patterson Davidson. In the actual manuscript Rufus is the 5th generation, so I’ve titled this page The Descendants of Daniel and Hannah Edwards of Coventry CT, which is more reflective of the entire manuscript. Also included in this book was a brief genealogy on the descendants of Robert and Ruth Huestis, who are the parents of Ruth Huestis. Daniel1 Edwards, Son of ______ and ______ (_____) Edwards, b. 1673, at _____; d. December 3, 1756, in his 83rd year; buried at Coventry, Conn. Daniel2 Edwards, Jr., Son of Daniel and _____ Edwards, b. — at_____; m. Hannah . Lived at Coventry, Conn. Children (10): Lucy Edwards, b. March 7, 1726. Elijah Edwards, b. September 12, 1727. Joseph Edwards, b. September 22, 1729. Beniah Edwards, b. March 14, 1731. Lurany Edwards, b. May 7, 1733. Samuel Edwards, b. July 27, 1738. Jobe Edwards,, b. September 4, 1740. * Adonijah Edwards, b. August 28, 1742; d. in 1831. Thomas Edwards, b. July 13, 1746; d. April 29, 1751 buried at Coventry. Daniel Edwards, b. April 21, 1748. Adonijah3 Edwards, son of Daniel Edwards, Jr., and Hannah his wife, of Coventry, Conn.; b. August 28, 1742, at Coventry; on February 28, 1765, at Coventry, Mary – called Polly...

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Dodge Genealogy Colonial Ancestry

Nicholls – Bruce Line The following is quoted from the book “Sergeant Francis Nicholls and Descendants of his Son, Caleb,” by Walter Nicholls. This book may be found in the Newberry Library, Chicago, Ill. The Nicholls-Bruce Lineage: King Robert Bruce, 1334; Robert Bruce Clackmanon, 1367; Sir Edward Bruce, Sir Robert Bruce, 1393; Sir David Bruce, Sir David Bruce, 1497; Sir Robert Bruce, Edward Bruce, 1565; Robert Bruce, Sir George Bruce of Carnock; Margaret Bruce, dau. of Sir George Bruce of Carnock, m. Francis Nicholls of London, England. Arms: A fesse between three lions’ heads. Crest: A tiger sedent, Ermine. Motto: Illi nunquam sedunt. Nicholls – Upham Line The origin of the name (Upham) is either Saxon or Norman, and signifies “Uplands – a home on the hills.” The first mention of the name as an ‘‘heredity distinction’’ and called by the French and English a “surname” because added to the baptismal name, was in a deed of lands to the monastery of Saint Maria de Bradenstock in Wills County, England – a gift from the estates of one Hugo de Upham. The name is also in the “Doomsday Book” and in the “Charter Rolls” of Turr, London. Robert Nicholls of London Robert Nicholls b. (not known); m. Elizabeth or Isabel; d. 1548. Children: 1 Thomas (the elder); 2 John; 3 Thomas (the younger). In the Will of Robert is...

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Herbert Genealogical Notes

Many years ago my dear Mother 1Margaret Herbert (Mrs. Dewitt Clinton Mather) planned a history and genealogy of the Herbert family in America. After expending a great deal of effort and a considerable amount of time and money, she accumulated a certain amount of data, a lot of it just scattered information with no apparent relationship. She had circulars printed and forms that could be filled out with the least possible effort giving names, and dates if possible, of father, grandfather, and son as far back as one could go. As comparatively few answers came in, she gave up the ambitious idea of so comprehensive work and decided to concentrate on a history of the New Jersey Herberts. However, illness and death put an end to all this. That the result of so much energy should not be wasted, I offer it with some additional information that I have gathered from time to time in spasmodic attempts to continue her work. Every effort has been made to present facts as accurately as possible. Assumptions and traditions will be so indicated. To begin at the beginning, the first authentic ancestor of what is now known as the Herbert family emerges from the mists of south Wales as one Thomas ap Guilym ap Jenkins, which of course, means that his father was William and his grandfather was Jenkins, but that is...

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Genealogy of John and Mary Hoskins of Cheshire, England

The Hoskins family came from Cheshire, England, in 1682, and settled in Chester, Pennsylvania, where “The Old Hoskins House” was built in 1688 on Edgemont Avenue, between Front and Second Streets, and was originally used as an Inn. The settling of the city of Chester was entered into with great enterprise and spirit, and those early pioneers established a foundation for all the requirements of living in that age. As early as 1678 they were engaged in laying out roads, building bridges, running ferries, and making possible intercourse between the settlements. Buildings were erected, with a large number to be used for Inns; meeting houses for religious worship, schools, courts where both women and men served on the juries; a House of Correction, where the so-called “Good Old Whipping Post,” Pillory, Tread-mill, Stocks, etc., were included; burial places were made by purchase of plots, including a negro burial ground; business and shipping flourished. We quote from Martin’s History of Chester, Pa.: “Vehicles were not used for traveling in the early days of the Province. The Swedes used boats, as did also the Dutch before them, the creeks and rivers were the natural highways to these people in their own countries, and both nature and necessity made them so in ours. The roads were generally mere paths through the woods, which were free from undergrowth, from the habit the Indians...

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Hood Genealogy

The Hood genealogy does not embrace all the families descended from Richard Hood, but only that succession in which the compiler of this work is found. She is indebted to a little book called “A Genealogy of Richard Hood, by Rev. George Hood and once owned by Richard Hood of Danversport for the record from Richard Hood to Josiah Moulton Hood, her grandfather. The details-names and dates, intervening-as well as the record of that succession in which the family of the above Richard Hood of Danversport is found can be seen in the little book referred to.

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