The extensive online listings for Monroe County, New York cemetery records should provide researchers with a clear picture of what is still available. The works of many people and groups of organizations over the past 100 years has collected and collated a vast expanse of records, even when there may no longer be a present marker or record of internment. This page is meant to provide a clear and in depth study into the cemeteries of Monroe County and Rochester proper, as well as the records that remain for them, and how to find them, whether online or offline.

A Short History of the Cemeteries in Monroe County, New York

One of the first duties of the new common council of Rochester was to provide a suitable resting-place for the dead. The early settlers had used for that purpose a half-acre lot on the corner of Plymouth avenue and Spring streets, by permission of its owners. Rochester, Fitzhugh and Carroll, who finally deeded it, as a free gift, to the village corporation in 1821. Three months later it was exchanged for a lot of three and a half acres on West Main street, where the City hospital now stands, and all the bodies were removed thither. This was always known as the Buffalo street burying-ground, while a smaller one on the east side of the river was called the Monroe street burying-ground. But both together were too circumscribed and too near to a growing population, so in 1836 the common council, approving a selection unofficially made by a committee of citizens, purchased of Silas Andrus a piece of ground comprising the first fifty-three acres of what is now Mt. Hope. Fortunately for posterity Silas Cornell was the surveyor of the city at that time, to whose rare skill as a landscape architect, and equally perhaps to his wise forbearance in altering as little as possible the undulations of the ground, it was owing that Mt. Hope has always been one of the most beautiful resting-places for the departed in all the land. The spirit of the original design has been adhered to by successive superintendent notably by George D. Stillson, who held the position for sixteen years. Additions were made to the necropolis from time to time, the largest being in 1865, when seventy-eight acres were purchased, so that it now contains about one hundred and eighty-eight acres. The first interment, that of William Carter, was made on August 18th, 1838; on the 1st of June, 1894, the fifty thousandth burial took place and up to this time some sixty thousand have been laid away there, a veritable city of the dead, a silent city.

While there were some few Catholics interred at Mt. Hope in early days, the great majority of that communion, practically all of them, preferred to bury their dead in ground consecrated by their church, and so the trustees of St. Patrick’s bought an extensive tract on the Pinnacle hills, southeast of the city, in 1838, and for the next thirty-three years the interment of English-speaking Catholics was made in the Pinnacle burying-ground, as it was always called, since which time much of the light, sandy soil of that eminence has been removed for building purposes. The German Catholics have had three cemeteries — that of St. Joseph, on Lyell avenue; of Sts. Peter and Paul, on Maple street, and of St. Boniface, on South Clinton street — but almost all the bodies have been removed from these and deposited in the Holy Sepulcher cemetery. This comprises about one hundred and forty acres, situated on Lake avenue, north of the city line, in the town of Greece, and extending to the bank of the river. The location is a most desirable one, and since it was opened, in 1871, it has been increasingly beautified, so that it has become very attractive to all visitors.

Perceiving the advantage that the Holy Sepulcher had over Mt. Hope in being located so far from the dwellings of the living, several persons formed themselves into a corporation in 1892 and bought one hundred acres of land just north of the former, where the grounds were at once laid out in a suitable manner and were tastefully decorated, the result being that lots were speedily purchased and interments are very frequent in the lovely Riverside cemetery. One other place of the dead might have been mentioned before, on account of its antiquity. Although within the city limits, near the southern end of Genesee street, it was doubtless intended for the use of the dwellers in Scottsville and Chili, for it is said to have been established in 1812, when there were no residents here. It has always been known as the Rapids burying-ground. 1Peck, Wiliam. History of Rochester and Monroe County New York, vol 1, pp. 69-70. New York and Chicago: The Pioneer Publishing Company. 1908.

Adam’s Basin Cemetery, Ogden

Almshouse Burial Ground, Rochester

New York State Hospital, Rochester, NY

New York State Hospital, Rochester, NY

In 1984, the burial ground of more than a thousand people was accidentally unearthed in what may be the largest “forgotten” cemetery in Rochester. The Almshouse Burying Ground in Highland Park south may have opened as early as the 1820’s with the founding of the county poorhouse and continued until about 1863, when records at Mt. Hope Cemetery show that the paupers’ burials began to be made there. The 296 burials removed from this site were reburied at Mt. Hope Cemetery in 1985, the remaining 600 bodies were left at the existing site. 2Thomas, W. Stephen and Rosenberg-Naparsteck, Ruth. Sleepers’ City, The Sesquicentennial History of Mt. Hope Cemetery. Published in Rochester History, vol. 1, Oct., 1988, No. 4.

  • Records may exist for this cemetery, but only in the form of Official Records of the Poor Houses of Monroe County – NY State Microfilm Series A1978: Rolls 75-84. This microfilm series has been reproduced by Ancestry and is known as: New York, Census of Inmates in Almshouses and Poorhouses, 1830-1920. This database covers the years of 1856-1919 for Monroe County and contains a census of each person residing in the poor house of Rochester.
  • A description of Monroe County poor house.
  • Mt. Hope Cemetery Records, Rochester, Monroe County, New York
    Inmates of Monroe County Insane Asylum; County Poorhouse/Almshouse; Jail, Workhouse/Penitentiary; House of Refuge; Pest House/Hope Hospital; Rochester House. Under the heading “Residence,” a street name will be given with no specific address; or it will list the place where the person died such as: Insane Asylum, Asylum, County House, Jail, etc. (Be aware that there was an Asylum Street in the City of Rochester that as far as I know, had no connection with the Monroe County Insane Asylum). About 1891, you will start to see the words “Rochester State Hospital” under “Residence.” At some point in the 1900s, instead of listing the place of death as Rochester State Hospital the address has been given instead as “1600 South Avenue.” In some instances, the family of the deceased claimed the body and buried them in the family plot. In the case of pauper and indigent insane, the hospital buried them in unmarked, anonymous graves at Mount Hope Cemetery. Some unclaimed bodies were donated by state hospitals to state medical colleges for the advancement of medical science in which case no grave will be found.
  • Records of the Monroe County Insane Asylum (1857-1891)
    The Records of the Monroe County Insane Asylum are not comprehensive. They include a single volume of Board of Trustees minutes (1889-1891), a fairly extensive collection of Medical Certificates of Lunacy, full admission & discharge records between 1857 and 1891, and clinical records for the years 1885-1891. The Records of the Monroe County Insane Asylum were acquired with those of the Rochester State Hospital in 1977. They were reprocessed in the autumn of 2009. This collection comprises nine ledgers and six document boxes occupying nine linear feet.

Ascension Garden, Henrietta

Located in Henrietta, NY, at the intersection of Pinnacle and Williams Road, just west of Mendon Ponds Park

Atchinson Cemetery, Parma

  • Map It
  • Monroe County NYGenWeb – Transcription
    The tombstones in this cemetery have been copied a least three times before this. In June 1931 Mary T. Douglas of the Irondequoit Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution make a two page list. Another one page list of tombstone inscriptions was made by an unknown person in the 1930s. Finally, another one page list was made on March 22, 1948 by Theta Hakes Brown and Belle Eldredge LaMont. This list combines the three previous lists and then a check of the cemetery was made in August 1984 by Richard T. Halsey to make corrections and additions.
  • New Horizons Genealogy – Transcription
  • FindAGrave – Transcriptions and Photos

Baptist Cemetery, Pittsford

At the intersection of Mendon Center, Tobey and Calkins Roads. Was used until 1880. At that the time 30 interments were transferred to the Pioneer and Pittsford cemeteries.

Interment records not known to have survived.

Baptist Hill Cemetery, Mendon

See: Mendon Cemetery, Mendon

Barben Cemetery, Mendon

See: Miller Cemetery, Mendon

Barnes Cemetery, Mendon

Pittsford-West Bloomfield Road, north of Cheese Factory Road

Interment records not known to have survived.

Baxter Cemetery, Hamlin

Beach Ridge Cemetery, Sweden

Beach Ridge Cemetery was organized in 1828. In 1891 Lakeview Cemetery was organized just to the north of Beach Ridge. Over the years, Lakeview Cemetery continued to grow while Beach Ridge did not. At some undetermined point in time, Lakeview took over the management of Beach Ridge. The sign along Lake Road only mentions Lakeview Cemetery and says it was established 1891 but in fact there are much older burials in the Beach Ridge sections of the cemetery. 3Monroe County NYGenWeb.

  • Monroe County NYGenWeb – Transcription
    The tombstone records on this page were taken in Sept. 1931 by Mary T. Douglas and Myrte Rice Haynes of the Irondequoit Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution in Rochester, N.Y. Other cemetery lists taken by these ladies have indicated that they did not copy all the tombstones when they compiled their lists. It appears they only copied the older looking tombstones. This listing includes tombstones from both the Beach Ridge and Lakeview Cemeteries as at the time they were copied, they thought that it was only one cemetery.

  • FindAGrave – Transcriptions and Photos

Beebe Pioneer Cemetery, Greece

See: Hoosick Hill Pioneer Cemetery, Greece

Beers-Billinghurst Cemetery, Pittsford

564 Mendon Road, Pittsford

Belcoda Cemetery, Wheatland

See: Wheatland Baptist Cemetery, Wheatland

Bennett Road Cemetery, Parma

This pioneer farm burying ground lies about a mile back from the road in dense woods next to Salmon Creek. It is on private land and is not visible from the road. There are three formal tombstones (only one legible and complete) and at least six other graves marked with blank fieldstones.

Big Ridge Cemetery, Greece

See: Wagner Farm Cemetery, Greece.

Black Cemetery, Parma

See: Bennett Road Cemetery, Parma

Blossom Cemetery, Hamlin

The Blossom Cemetery is located near Hilton, N. Y. in the Town of Parma, Monroe County, New York. Located on the north side of Rte. 18, about 1/2 mile west of intersection with Rte. 260. Well maintained. Still used.

Bradstreet Cemetery, Irondequoit

The Bradstreet Cemetery is located on Culver Road at Sea Breeze. It is a very small private plot containing about seven graves. Its origin dates back to 1830 when a man by the name of Stephen Woodman who owned 100 acres of land at Sea Breeze had a private cemetery on his farm. When Samuel Brad-street bought the Woodman farm, the Woodman Cemetery became the Bradstreet Cemetery. Irondequoit Post No. 134 of the American Legion has assumed the care of this plot. 4West, Maude I., Town Historian. Irondequoit Story: a history of the town of Irondequoit (suburb of Rochester, county of Monroe, state of New York) covering the years 1839-1957. Published by The Town of Irondequoit.

Brighton Cemetery, Brighton

Brighton Cemetery
Hoyt Place (Off Winton Rd. South near I490)
Rochester, NY 14618

When the Erie Canal was completed in 1825 it flowed quietly past the cemetery on the eastern and northern sides. Today that quiet flow of water has been replaced by a never-ending flow of thousands of noisy vehicles as they speed through the interchange of Expressways I-490 and I-590 which were built on the bed of the old canal.  Most of the early pioneers to Brighton were pious Congregationalists from New England who soon organized a church which met in members’ homes for several years. In the early 1820s they built a small brick church (40′ x 55′) on the high ground adjacent to the cemetery. Sunday services were from 10 am to noon when there was an intermission for the noon meal: In pleasant weather the members would stroll through the cemetery reading the inscriptions and looking for a shady place to enjoy their picnic lunch. When, the canal was completed they often spent the intermission watching the boats being pulled through the nearby lock. Then back to church they would go for another two-hour session. In 1867 a flaming shingle blown by the wind from a burning Village tavern landed on the steeple of the church which was soon reduced to ashes. Many valuable items were saved by quick-acting church members, but the cemetery records which were stored in the church were completely destroyed. The only record of burials prior to 1867 was the information gleaned from the gravestones and the names of those persons buried in unmarked graves were lost forever. Therefore the records of the Brighton Cemetery are far from complete. A larger and more beautiful church was built in 1868 on East Avenue in the Village, and the church and cemetery were now separated by the canal. For years the church was responsible for the cemetery. However In 1892 the Brighton Cemetery Association with a Board of Trustees was formed to manage the cemetery culminating in a complete separation of the church and the cemetery. – Ruth K. Porter

Brighton Cemetery, Rochester

Little is known about this cemetery, except that it was once located on the east side of Mt. Hope Avenue opposite the present grounds of Mt. Hope Cemetery. The commissioners of Mt. Hope assumed control in the nineteenth century, removed the burials to Mt. Hope and sold the land. 5Thomas, W. Stephen and Rosenberg-Naparsteck, Ruth. Sleepers’ City, The Sesquicentennial History of Mt. Hope Cemetery. Published in Rochester History, vol. 1, Oct., 1988, No. 4.

Interments moved to Mt. Hope Cemetery.

Brininstool Cemetery, Henrietta

Erie Station  Road

  • Map It
  • Monroe County NYGenWeb – Transcription
    The inscriptions were read and recorded in June 1939, and recopied in 1977. These records were quite incomplete, so June C. Feder read all the inscriptions in May 1986.
  • New Horizons Genealogy – Transcription
  • Burial records from the Town of Henrietta, NY
    This is the database compilation of 3,604 burials in the Town of Henrietta. (Alphabetical by Last, First, MI) Not all are buried in Henrietta, in fact some are deaths of people from the Town of Henrietta that are buried in other Towns
  • FindAGrave – Transcriptions and Photos

 

Britton Road Cemetery, Greece

The Britton Road Cemetery was established in 1881 and the Stone Road cemetery was established in the 1920’s.  Over time land was subdivided and developed by congregations, families, and fraternal organizations as small independent cemeteries.  The Britton Road Association was formed in 1954 to oversee the operation and maintenance of the independent cemeteries.

Congregations and organizations with plots in the Britton Road and Stone Road cemeteries include:

  1. Ain Yakov
  2. Agudas Achim Nusach Ari
  3. Anshe Polen
  4. B’nai Israel-Ahavas Achim
  5. Beth Am
  6. Beth Chaim
  7. Beth Hakneses Hachodosh
  8. Beth Hamedresh – Beth Israel
  9. Beth Hamedresh Hagodel
  10. Beth Israel
  11. Beth Joseph Center
  12. Congregation Beth Sholom
  13. Congregation Light of Israel
  14. Etz Chaim
  15. Gideon Lodge (I.O.O.F. Lodge #785)
  16. Jewish Nat’l Worker’s Alliance (Farband)
  17. Jewish Spanish-American War Veterans
  18. Kneses Israel
  19. Knights of Pythias (Jay Lodge)
  20. Kowel Plot
  21. Leopold Street Shule
  22. Morris Street Shule
  23. Rhine Street Shule
  24. Rochester Jewish Relief Organization (R.J.R.O.)
  25. Tiphereth Israel
  26. Waad (Vaad) Hakolel
  27. Workman’s Circle

Brockport Cemetery, Brockport, Sweden

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  • Monroe County NYGenWeb – Transcription
    The tombstones in this cemetery have been copied twice before this. In Dec. 1927 Alberta B. Brennan of the Monroe Chapter (Brockport, NY) of the Daughters of the American Revolution made a twenty page list of tombstone inscriptions. On the first page of her list it says “not complete.” Another 46 page list was made in the early 1930s. It has no author’s name on it but appears similar to lists made by members of the Irondequoit Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution. This list was made in May 1992 by Richard T. Halsey and relies on the older lists for inscriptions which could no longer be read. It adds hundreds of names to both of the older lists.

Brockport Rural Cemetery, Sweden

Brown Cemetery, Henrietta

Buckbee’s Corners Cemetery, Chili

East side of Union St, just south of Interstate 490.

Buckbee Rural Cemetery, Chili

See: Buckbee’s Corners Cemetery, Chili

Bushman Cemetery, Henrietta

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  • Monroe County NYGenWeb – Transcription
    A list of tombstone inscriptions for this cemetery was published in the Rochester Post-Express of June 10, 1911 by Anah B. Yates. Another list of tombstone inscriptions was published in Aug. 1980 by Mr. & Mrs. Robert H. Dows and Mr. & Mrs. William Souve of the Irondequoit Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution. This list was made by taking these two previous lists and making a master list. Then a visit to the cemetery was made by Richard T. Halsey on Oct. 4, 1991 and some minor corrections were made to the master list.
  • New Horizons Genealogy – Transcription
  • Burial records from the Town of Henrietta, NY
    This is the database compilation of 3,604 burials in the Town of Henrietta. (Alphabetical by Last, First, MI) Not all are buried in Henrietta, in fact some are deaths of people from the Town of Henrietta that are buried in other Towns
  • FindAGrave – Transcriptions and Photos

Bushnells Basin Cemetery, Perinton

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  • Monroe County NYGenWeb – Transcription
    A listing of the tombstone in this cemetery was made in 1928 by members of the Daughters of the American Revolution. It was then updated in May 1987 by Richard T. Halsey.
  • FindAGrave – Transcriptions and Photos

Calkins Cemetery, Henrietta

See: Whitaker Cemetery, Henrietta

Campion-Wright Cemetery, Ogden

See: Pioneer Cemetery, Ogden

Canawaugus Cemetery, Wheatland

See: Warren Cemetery, Wheatland

Canfield Cemetery, Mendon

Carpenter Road Cemetery, Parma

Draffin Road formally called Carpenter Road.

Interment records not known to have survived.

Carter Cemetery, Perinton

Carthage Cemetery, Rochester

Located on Tyler Street. Built over before 1930.

Interment records not known to have survived.

Castle Cemetery, Parma

See: Castle Family Pioneer Cemetery, Parma

Castle Family Pioneer Cemetery, Parma

  • Map It
  • Monroe County NYGenWeb – Transcription
    This list was made by taking a list made by Mary T. Douglas and Myrte Rice Haynes on Aug. 19, 1931 and correcting it and adding to it by a visit to the cemetery by Richard T. Halsey on June 17, 1989.
  • FindAGrave – Transcriptions and Photos

Chamberlain Cemetery, Mendon

See: Taylor Road Cemetery, Mendon

Charlotte Cemetery, Rochester

Charlotte, settled before Rochester, established the Charlotte Cemetery, which still holds the remains of the famous daredevil Sam Patch. His leap from the Upper Falls on Friday, November 13th, 1829, ended in tragedy. His body was recovered the following Spring from under the ice at the mouth of the river not far from his final resting place. 6Thomas, W. Stephen and Rosenberg-Naparsteck, Ruth. Sleepers’ City, The Sesquicentennial History of Mt. Hope Cemetery. Published in Rochester History, vol. 1, Oct., 1988, No. 4.

  • Map It
  • Monroe County NYGenWeb – Transcription
    This list is made from many various sources. There have been two previous lists published by the D.A.R. The first list was “from the papers of Anah B. Yates and was prepared by Mary T. Douglas.” The second list was taken by Myrtle R. Haynes. Added to this were some names that were in two newspaper articles on this cemetery. An article in the Rochester Morning Herald of Sept. 13, 1886 says that Samuel Clyde is buried in the cemetery. Also, the Times-Union of Nov. 6, 1954 gave names of veterans that are buried in the cemetery. Some of these veterans (James Day, James Diehl and Guy Wheeler) do not have tombstones. A visit to the cemetery in May 1987 added another 75 names. The 1987 visit missed the newer section and this was rectified in April 2002. Burial records added a few more names of those interred here without a tombstone. Monroe County Veteran Burial records added data on a few men’s enlistments in the military.
  • New Horizons Genealogy – Transcription
  • New York Gravestones – Transcription, photos
  • FindAGrave – Transcriptions and Photos
  • Billion Graves – Transcriptions and photos

Cherry Street Cemetery

In 1821 the Cherry Street, or East Avenue, Cemetery was laid our between Cherry (Gibbs) and Scio Streets and East Avenue and Main Street. Four years later burials were moved to the East Burying Ground on the state road to Pittsford (Monroe Avenue) near Alexander Street. 7Thomas, W. Stephen and Rosenberg-Naparsteck, Ruth. Sleepers’ City, The Sesquicentennial History of Mt. Hope Cemetery. Published in Rochester History, vol. 1, Oct., 1988, No. 4.

Interments moved to East Cemetery, Rochester

Chili Presbyterian Cemetery, Chili

This cemetery is located on the west side of Chestnut Ridge Road just north of the intersection with Chili Avenue in Chili, NY.

  • Map It
  • Monroe County NYGenWeb – Transcription
    The tombstones in this cemetery were copied in July 1985 by Mary T. Douglas of the Irondequoit Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution. They were copied again in 1935 by Mrs. Mary B. Wells and Frances M. Witmer of Leroy, NY. These two lists were combined and a visit was made to cemetery in Aug. 1991 by Richard T. Halsey and some corrections and additions were done at that time.

  • FindAGrave – Photos

Chili Rural Cemetery #3, Chili

See: Grange Hall Cemetery, Chili

Churchville Cemetery, Churchville, Riga

See: Creekside Cemetery, Churchville, Riga

Clapper Farm Cemetery, Parma

On that portion of West Ave. that was former called Clapper Road, west of the village of Hilton.

Clarkson Union Cemetery, Hamlin

See: Blossom Cemetery, Hamlin

Clifton Cemetery, Ogden

See: Maple Grove Cemetery, Ogden

Colby Street Cemetery, Ogden

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  • Monroe County NYGenWeb – Transcription
    The tombstones in this cemetery have been copied at least three before. About 1928, Mrs. Mary B. Wells & Frances M. Witmer of the Te-car-na-wunna Chapter (LeRoy, NY) of the Daughters of the American Revolution copied the tombstones. Mrs. Herbert Smith of the Irondequoit Chapter (Rochester, NY) of the D. A. R. copied the tombstones in September. She was assisted by Miss Ida Colby, who was a descendant of Abraham Colby and added personal knowledge of some of the people buried here. In 1966, Mrs. Pearl D. Smith copied the tombstone inscriptions. She also was a member of the Irondequoit Chapter of the D. A. R. A master list was made and compared to the tombstones during a visit to the cemetery on 15 Aug. 1999 by Richard Halsey.

  • Persons Buried in Ogden, NY
    This is a name index to persons buried in Ogden from 1803 to 2004, gleaned from headstones, cemetery records, and death records; indexed by Donald Specht. 2014 edition.

    • Addendum to Persons Buried in Ogden
      This is a companion to Persons Buried in Ogden and contains additional information gleaned from death and other records; indexed by Donald Specht.
  • FindAGrave – Transcriptions and Photos

Cole Cemetery, Irondequoit

Colebrook and Rock Beach Roads.

Known Internments:

  • Cole, Harriet

Cox Cemetery, Wheatland

A large (approximately one acre) pioneer burying ground, there are now no stones visible. This overgrown cemetery sits almost on the county line of Monroe and Livingston Counties. There are no existing records and the only list of inscriptions was published in a column by Anah Yates in the long-gone “Rochester Post-Express” newspaper in 1911.

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  • Monroe County NYGenWeb – Transcription
    These records were published in 1911 in a newspaper column titled Early Rochester Family Records by Anah B. Yates in the newspaper, Rochester Post-Express.
  • FindAGrave – Transcriptions and Photos

Creekside Cemetery, Riga

Crosby Cemetery, Rush

See: East Rush Cemetery, Rush

Culver Road Cemetery, Irondequoit

Culver Road Cemetery is located on Culver Road near Hoffman Road. It was formerly a part of the Evershed farm. Five acres were purchased by the Town on April 17, 1895 and on December 31, 1942 another 4.91 acres were added. 8West, Maude I., Town Historian. Irondequoit Story: a history of the town of Irondequoit (suburb of Rochester, county of Monroe, state of New York) covering the years 1839-1957. Published by The Town of Irondequoit.

Davis Cemetery, Rush

East Avenue Cemetery

See: Cherry Street Cemetery

East Baptist Church Cemetery, Henrietta

East Cemetery, Rochester

Before the interments from Cherry Street Cemetery were moved here, the land was already an informal cemetery owned by Chalres Bixby. In 1872, the area was appropriated for the public schools, so these burials were removed to Mt. Hope Cemetery, making a third resting place for pioneers first buried on Cherry Street. 9Thomas, W. Stephen and Rosenberg-Naparsteck, Ruth. Sleepers’ City, The Sesquicentennial History of Mt. Hope Cemetery. Published in Rochester History, vol. 1, Oct., 1988, No. 4.

“When they first began burying there, wolves howled in the woods to the south and wild foxes were plenty… Funerals did not cost much…. A neighbor would dig a grave and possibly, preach the sermon. Daddy harkins dug many of the graves. Pine or cherry coffins were good enough for anybody and many a time I have seen a purse made up for the new grave, to pay the doctor’s bill or other expenses. – Mrs. Wiliam Hanford10Parker, Jane Marsh. Rochester: A Story Historical, 1884.

East Lake Cemetery, Sweden

  • Monroe County NYGenWeb – Transcription
    The stones in this cemetery have previously been copied three times. The first list was made by Mary B. Wells and Frances M. Witmer in 1929. The second list was made by Mrs. Lulu Smith and Mrs. Myrte Rice Haynes in May 1939. The third list was found at S.U.N.Y. at Brockport but there was no name or date on that list. This list was made by combining the three previous lists and then a visit was made to the cemetery on June 30, 1989 by Richard T. Halsey to check for errors.
  • FindAGrave – Transcriptions and Photos

East Mendon Cemetery, Mendon

See: Mendon Cemetery, Menden

East Rush Cemetery, Rush

  • Monroe County NYGenWeb – Transcription
    Inscriptions copied in 1930 by Mary T. Douglas, Irondequoit Chapter, NSDAR, Rochester, NY. They were copied again, Sept. 13, 1992 by June C. Feder of Fairport, NY.
  • FindAGrave – Transcriptions and Photos

East Street Cemetery, Pittsford

East Sweden Cemetery, Sweden

East Sweden Cemetery is better known as East Lake Cemetery in Sweden. You should see the listings under that heading.

Egypt Cemetery, Perinton

Elmgrove Cemetery, Perinton

Elmgrove Methodist Cemetery, Gates

See: Gates Methodist Episcopal Cemetery, Gates

Elmwood Cemetery, Perinton

  • Map It
  • Monroe County NYGenWeb – Transcription
    This list was compiled in May 1987 by Richard T. Halsey from many sources including some of the burial records in possession of the town historian.
  • FindAGrave – Transcriptions and Photos

Evergreen Cemetery, Chili

See: North Chili Rural Cemetery, Chili

Fairfield Cemetery, Ogden

Falls Cemetery, Greece

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  • Monroe County NYGenWeb – Transcription
    This list of gravestones in the Falls Cemetery only includes those up to the year 1965. The reason being that including later burials would at least double the size of the list. Four previous lists were made of the tombstones herein: A list by Anah B. Yates and published in the Rochester Post-Express beginning with the Sept. 2, 1911 issue; A list made by an un-named person about 1928; A list made on Aug. 19, 1931 by Mary T. Douglas and Myrte R. Douglas; A list made in 1965 by Marjorie D. Dows and Dr. Virginia Moscrip. These list were combined into a master list then a visit was made in the summer of 1987 by Richard T. Halsey to settle any discrepancies.

  • New York Gravestones – Transcription, photos
  • FindAGrave – Transcriptions and Photos
  • Billion Graves – Transcriptions and photos

Fellows Cemetery, Chili

West side of Union St., by Craigie Brae golf course.

  • Map It
  • Monroe County NYGenWeb – Transcription
    A list of tombstone inscriptions was published in the Rochester Post Express on July 22, 1911. That list was compiled by Anah B. Yates. Another list of inscriptions was compiled in July 1934 by Mary Douglas and Myrte Rice Haynes and it says on the top of that list that it adds to Mrs. Yates list but it leaves off some of the inscriptions in Mrs. Yates list. In July 1939 a list of inscriptions was prepared by Mary Moulthop and Myrte Rice Haynes. Each of these three lists has some inscriptions that are not on the other two lists. This list was prepared by combining the three previous lists and then a visit was made to the cemetery on July 20, 1991 by Richard T. Halsey to make corrections to the master list. Five inscriptions that were not on any of the three previous lists were added with this list.
  • Monroe County NY USGenWeb Archives – Transcription
  • New York Gravestones – Transcription, photos
  • FindAGrave – Photos

First Presbyterian Memorial Garden, Pittsford

Fishell Cemetery, Rush

See: Thomas Cemetery, Rush

Flynn Road Cemetery, Greece

AKA: Massey Burying Ground

Frankfort Cemetery, Rochester

Eastern corner of Frank and Smith Streets. Was used by the Society of Friends (Quakers). The lot size was 200 by 66 feet.

Interment records not known to have survived.

Friends Burial Ground, Mendon

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  • Monroe County NYGenWeb – Transcription
    Cemetery Stones Copied by Diane Ham and Eileen Havens in August 2004. In 2011 some corrections and additions to this list were made by Cheri Branca.
  • FindAGrave – Transcriptions and Photos

Friends Cemetery, Rochester

Little is known about this cemetery, except that it was once located on the east side of Mt. Hope Avenue opposite the present grounds of Mt. Hope Cemetery. The commissioners of Mt. Hope assumed control in the nineteenth century, removed the burials to Mt. Hope and sold the land. 11Thomas, W. Stephen and Rosenberg-Naparsteck, Ruth. Sleepers’ City, The Sesquicentennial History of Mt. Hope Cemetery. Published in Rochester History, vol. 1, Oct., 1988, No. 4.

Interments moved to Mt. Hope Cemetery.

Frisbee Family Cemetery, Greece

Fuller Cemetery, Penfield

See: Griswold Cemetery, Penfield

Garbutt Cemetery, Wheatland

See: Garbuttsville Cemetery, Wheatland

Garbuttsville Cemetery, Wheatland

Garbuttsville Cemetery

Photograph of Garbuttsville Cemetery in 2008 by Jerrye & Roy Klotz, MD.

Garbuttsville Cemetery is a historic cemetery located at the hamlet of Garbutt in the town of Wheatland in Monroe County, New York. It is one of the earliest surviving cemeteries in Monroe County and is an intact country cemetery that reflects the history of the once thriving industrial hamlet of Garbuttsville (now Garbutt). It also illustrates the development patterns of small vernacular cemeteries through the 19th century and prevalent styles of modest and middle class grave monuments from that period. There are approximately 570 graves with most graves dating prior to 1920. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2006. The cemetery was established in 1827.

Garland Cemetery, Clarkson

The Garland Cemetery is located on the south side of Ridge Road (Rt. 104) approximately 1.5 miles east of the Town of Clarkson, in Monroe County, NY. Established in 1868.

  • Map It
  • Garland Cemetery Index – Transcription
    This listing is the result of the work of many people over many years. In the 1980s the stones were read and recorded by Mary Smith, Hazel Kleinbach, Ruth Rayburn, DAR members, and others. In 2005, the Garland Cemetery was canvassed again by Donald Specht to make corrections and to bring this listing up to date. Specht is a volunteer and Trustee of the Ogden Farmers’ Library.
  • Monroe County NYGenWeb – Cemetery Maps
  • FindAGrave – Transcriptions and Photos

Gates Center Cemetery Record, Gates

Gates Methodist Episcopal Cemetery, Gates

Gates Presbyterian Cemetery, Gates

  • Map It
  • Monroe County NYGenWeb – Transcription
    This list was made by first combining lists of tombstones made in the past. These are: A list made by Anah B. Yates and published in the Rochester Post-Express on May 20, 1911; A list made by Mary T. Douglas in the 1920’s.; A list made on Nov. 14, 1931 by Myrte Rice Haynes; A list made by the Yorkers (History) Club of Gates-Chili Middle School and published in the Rochester Genealogical Society publication “Hear Ye, Hear Ye” (Vol. 3, #2 and Vol. 4, #11), circa 1982-3. A visit was made to the cemetery on Aug. 11, 1990 by Richard T. Halsey and corrections were made to the master list and a few tombstone inscriptions not on any of the lists were added.
  • New Horizon Genealogical Services – Transcription
  • FindAGrave – Transcriptions and Photos

German Catholic Cemetery, Rochester

Located on Goodman Street south of the Railroad tracks. 12Thomas, W. Stephen and Rosenberg-Naparsteck, Ruth. Sleepers’ City, The Sesquicentennial History of Mt. Hope Cemetery. Published in Rochester History, vol. 1, Oct., 1988, No. 4.

Interment records not known to have survived.

German Cemetery, Rush

See: East Rush Cemetery, Rush

Grange Hall Cemetery, Chili

AKA: Chili Rural Cemetery #3; Stryker Road Cemetery

North side of Striker Rd, about 1/4 mile of Rt. 386.

  • Map It
  • Monroe County NYGenWeb – Transcription
    The tombstones in this cemetery were copied in July 1928 by Mary T. Douglas of the Irondequoit Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution. They were copied again in July 1939 by Mary Moulthrop and Myrte Rice Haynes of the Irondequoit Chapter of the D.A.R.. These two lists were combined and a visit to the cemetery was made on July 14, 1991 by Richard T. Halsey to make corrections and about 60 inscriptions were added at that time.
  • FindAGrave – Transcriptions and Photos

Graves Cemetery, Mendon

See: Rochester Junction Cemetery, Mendon

Greece North Cemetery

Greece Wagner Cemetery, Greece

See: Wagner Farm Cemetery, Greece.

Greenvale Cemetery, Perinton

  • Map It
  • Monroe County NYGenWeb – Transcription
    This listing was made by Lindsey Alexander as a Girl Scout, Gold Award Project. She started in the summer of 1997 and completed this project in May 1998.

Greenvale Rural Cemetery, Perinton

See: Greenvale Cemetery, Perinton

Griswold Cemetery, Penfield

This very small cemetery is located in a field next to a house,behind a chicken coop on Harris Rd., Penfield, NY.

Grove Place Cemetery, Chili

Southeast corner of Chili Avenue and Marshall Road. Serving the Town of Chili and surrounding Rochester area continuously since 1856. Owned and Operated by the Grove Place Cemetery Association

Hanford’s Landing Cemetery, Rochester

Rochester’s oldest cemetery was at King’s Landing, now Hanford’s Landing on Lake Avenue opposite Kodak park. Soon after the Kings settled at the Lower Falls landing in the 1790s, “Genesee fever” killed several family members and the first cemetery was established. The Hanford brothers bought the Landing a few years later and some of their family members are buried there, too. Though the exact grave sites have been lost, it is known that a number of Revolutionary War veterans were also buried there. This cemetery can be see today from Lake Avenue near Driving Park. 13Thomas, W. Stephen and Rosenberg-Naparsteck, Ruth. Sleepers’ City, The Sesquicentennial History of Mt. Hope Cemetery. Published in Rochester History, vol. 1, Oct., 1988, No. 4.

Harris Road Cemetery, Webster

Hetzler Cemetery, Wheatland

Southeast corner of Chili Avenue and North Road.

Interments moved to Oatka Cemetery, Wheatland.

High Street Cemetery

All burial records are kept at the Highway Department at 40 White Road, Brockport, NY.

Hilton Village Cemetery, Parma

See: Tyler Pioneer Cemetery, Parma

Holy Angels Cemetery, Scottsville, Wheatland

Holy Family Roman Catholic Cemetery, Rochester

Maple Street, Rochester. Used until at least 1915. Graves moved to Holy Sepulchre in 1955.

Holy Ghost Catholic Cemetery, Gates

See: Holy Ghost Roman Catholic Cemetery, Gates.

Holy Ghost Roman Catholic Cemetery, Gates

Holy Sepulchre Cemetery, Rochester

St. Patrick’s was the first Catholic parish in Rochester, and opened its small downtown graveyard in 1823. The space quickly filled up, and area Catholics had to buy burial space in common cemeteries until 1839. At that time, the second St. Patrick’s cemetery was built on the south side of the city at Pinnacle Hill, and all members of the local Irish parishes were buried there.

Four German Catholic parishes opened four separate cemeteries between 1844 and 1864: Sts. Peter & Paul’s on Maple Street, St. Joseph’s on East Main Street at Goodman, St. Boniface’s on South Clinton near the Pinnacle, and Holy Family on Maple Street.

Bishop Bernard J. McQuaid was named Rochester’s first bishop in 1868, and quickly realized the need for a single burial ground for all of Rochester’s Catholics, of all nationalities, for generations to come. In 1871, after much planning and research, he dedicated and solemnly consecrated Holy Sepulchre. Located just four miles from downtown Rochester, the bishop secured a 110-acre tract of farmland located along both sides of Charlotte Boulevard (now known as Lake Avenue). An estimated 10,000 people attended the consecration ceremony, a strong indication of the community support for the cemetery. 14History, About Holy Sepulchre Cemetery. http://www.holysepulchre.org/about/history : Accessed 4/6/2016.

Holy Trinity Cemetery, Webster

  • Map It
  • Monroe County NYGenWeb – Transcription
    The tombstones in this cemetery were copied about 1983 by Richard T. Halsey. This list of tombstone inscriptions is complete only through the year 1950. Post 1950 inscriptions have been included if on a stone with another inscription dated 1950 or before. Entire family units are thus shown if one one member died before Jan. 1, 1951.
  • New York Gravestones – Transcription, photos
  • Interment.net – Transcription
  • FindAGrave – Transcriptions and Photos
  • Billion Graves – Transcriptions and photos

Honeoye Falls Cemetery, Mendon

Established in 1799.

Hooker Cemetery, Irondequoit

1500 Portland Avenue
Irondequoit, Monroe County

The Hooker Cemetery is located on the east side of Portland Ave. behind the old Hooker Home, now occupied by Mrs. Ailing Clements, a descendant of the Hooker family. This cemetery was a gift to the Town of Irondequoit by Mr. Alexander Hooker in 1840, a year after the town was organized. It was used as a public burying ground by the town until 1895 when the Culver Road Cemetery ground was purchased.

Until the Culver Road Cemetery was opened, the grounds of the Hooker Cemetery were cared for by men known as Cemetery Trustees appointed by the Town Board. From 1895 to 1932 some attention was given this plot by these trustees, but in the face of indifference by the Board they became discouraged and since then the grounds have received no attention. The law states that a sum of $300 annually must be spent to care for such cemeteries. Since 1932 this sum has not been set aside by the Board. This is the burial spot of all the early pioneers and is really THE HISTORICAL SPOT of the Town. In respect for those citizens who “cleared the forests and excited the earth to production” and made Irondequoit “one of the best places in the world to live” we owe them a decent burial spot. It is hoped that the present Town Board will remedy the mistake of previous boards and make this a plot of ground to which we may point with pride.

In 1953 and 1954 at the request of the historian, the Culver Post No. 2691 of the Veterans of Foreign Wars undertook the job of clearing away the underbrush and located the graves of thirteen veterans, including that of a soldier of the Revolutionary War, one of the Black Hawk War, a third of the War of 1812 and ten who served in the Civil War.

Many of the men who served this town as Supervisors, Town Clerks, Justices and many other capacities are buried there but their graves have been sadly neglected for many years. The Town Board did replace the fence in 1955, but there are many dead trees that should be removed, the ground should be cleared and seeded and the fallen stones replaced. 15West, Maude I., Town Historian. Irondequoit Story: a history of the town of Irondequoit (suburb of Rochester, county of Monroe, state of New York) covering the years 1839-1957. Published by The Town of Irondequoit.

Hoosick Hill Cemetery, Parma

AKA: Beebe Pioneer Cemetery, West Greece Cemetery

  • Map It
  • Monroe County NYGenWeb – Transcription
    A list of burials in this cemetery was made in 1928 by Mary T. Douglas. This list was made by making corrections and additions to that list by a visit to the cemetery on June 23, 1989 by Richard T. Halsey.
  • New Horizons Genealogy – Transcription
  • FindAGrave – Transcriptions and Photos

Hoyt Cemetery, Hamlin

See: Moore Family Cemetery, Hamlin

Industry Residential Center Graveyard, Rush

See: Valley View Cemetery, Rush

Irondequoit Cemetery, Irondequoit

Town of Irondequoit
1280 Titus Avenue
Rochester, New York 14617

The Irondequoit Cemetery is located at 3671 Culver Road. It was founded in 1895 and is a medium sized municipal cemetery managed by the Town of Irondequoit. A few burials appear to pre-date the cemetery’s founding due to small pioneer burying grounds being removed here in the 19th century. The cemetery office has records from 1944; older records are kept at the Town Hall. It is open from dawn to dusk.

Irondequoit United Church of Christ Garden

644 Titus Avenue
Irondequoit, New York

The memorial garden is at the center of the church and is accessible from the breezeway between the church office and the sanctuary.

Johnston Cemetery, Penfield

Established in 1823, set aside by Abram Johnston.

Joseph Morgan Cemetery, Chili

See: Morgan Cemetery, Chili

Joshua Lillie Graveyard, Pittsford

King’s Landing Cemetery, Rochester

See: Hanford’s Landing Cemetery, Rochester

Knapp Cemetery, Parma

See: Sage Family Pioneer Cemetery, Parma

Lakeside Cemetery, Hamlin

Lakeview Cemetery, Brockport, Sweden

In 1891 Lakeview Cemetery was organized just to the north of Beach Ridge. Over the years, Lakeview Cemetery continued to grow while Beach Ridge did not. At some undetermined point in time, Lakeview took over the management of Beach Ridge. The sign along Lake Road only mentions Lakeview Cemetery and says it was established 1891 but in fact there are much older burials in the Beach Ridge sections of the cemetery. 16Monroe NYGenWeb.

All burial records are kept at the Highway Department at 40 White Road, Brockport, NY.

Lakeview South Cemetery, Brockport, Sweden

See: Beach Ridge Cemetery, Brockport, Sweden

Locust Cemetery, Sweden

Brockport Road & County Line Road

  • Map It
  • Monroe County NYGenWeb – Transcription
    The tombstones in this cemetery have been copied three times before this. The first list was made in 1929 by Mrs. Mary B. Wells and Frances M. Witmer. The second list was made in 1935 by Mary T. Douglas. The third list was made on Sept. 6, 1935 by Mrs. Edward D. Stewart. This list was made by combining the three previous lists and then corrected by a visit by Richard T. Halsey on June 27, 1989.
  • Orleans County NYGenWeb – Transcription
    Many of the people buried here were Orleans Co. residents.
  • FindAGrave – Transcriptions and Photos

Locust Grove Cemetery, Adams Basin, Ogden

Established in 1838.

Locust Hill Cemetery, Sweden

See: Locust Cemetery, Sweden

Lowden Cemetery, Greece

Lowden Family Pioneer Cemetery, Greece

See: Lowden Cemetery, Greece

Maple Grove Cemetery, Chili

  • Map It
  • Monroe County NYGenWeb – Transcription
    The tombstones in this cemetery were copied in 1928 by Mary T. Douglas of the Irondequoit Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution. Additions and corrections were made by a visit to the cemetery in Aug. 1991 by Richard T. Halsey.

  • FindAGrave – Transcriptions and Photos

Maple Grove Cemetery, Ogden

Clifton Rd extension in hamlet of Clifton. Established in 1820.

  • Map It
  • Monroe County NYGenWeb – Transcription
    This list contains both tombstone records and burial records. The tombstones were copied during a visit to the cemetery on May 27th and 28th, 2000 by Richard Halsey. Also added to this list are burial records that were originally collected about 1952 by Mrs. Leah Adams Widger of burials with and without tombstones. It was the burial records that added the lot numbers to this listing. The burial records have been kept up-to-date by David VanderTang, who currently has possession of the burial records.

  • Persons Buried in Ogden, NY
    This is a name index to persons buried in Ogden from 1803 to 2004, gleaned from headstones, cemetery records, and death records; indexed by Donald Specht. 2014 edition.

    • Addendum to Persons Buried in Ogden
      This is a companion to Persons Buried in Ogden and contains additional information gleaned from death and other records; indexed by Donald Specht.
  • FindAGrave – Transcriptions and Photos

Maplewood Cemetery, Henrietta

Established in 1896 in the Town of Henrietta, New York. The Maplewood Cemetery, a landmark within a town rich in history, has its own heritage. The town burial site was originally privately owned by T.O. Jones and had been used as a town cemetery. It was incorporated in 1896 as a not-for-profit cemetery association, owned and managed by its members. Since the incorporation, approximately 20 acres have been added to the original 5.

Martin Cemetery, Henrietta

See: Brininstool Cemetery, Henrietta

Marvin Burial Ground, Ogden

Hutchings Road

Interment records not known to have survived.

Mason Road Cemetery, Perinton

See: Egypt Cemetery, Perinton

Massey Family Ground, Greece

See: Flynn Road Cemetery,  Greece

McCrackenville Cemetery, Rochester

The McCrackenville Cemetery, also known as the McCracken Grounds, is described in old records variously as “near to the Driving Park Bridge on the West side of the River” and “close to the intersection of Driving Park and Lake Avenue”.

The burial records of this cemetery came from the earliest record book of Mt. Hope Cemetery which also includes records of burials in this and other cemeteries. Those records indicate that Miss Jane Godfrey, the Griffin child, Luke McCracken and Dr. David McCracken all lived on State St. (now Lake Ave.) in Rochester. The records also indicate that on April 29, 1846 the remains of all three of the McCrackens were moved to lot 88M in Mt. Hope Cemetery. It is possible that the other two burials were also moved at that time. 17Monroe County NYGenWeb

McFarlan Cemetery, Rush

See: Number Six Cemetery, Rush

Mendon Cemetery, Mendon

  • Map It
  • Monroe County NYGenWeb – Transcription
    This cemetery has had three records of tombstone inscriptions made before this. The first was most definately the best of the three. In 1890, Daniel Allen compiled a list from the records of interments and supplemented this with information from various other sources. His list also included the lot that the person was buried on. [Note: Potters Field referred to herein is the pauper’s lot]. The second list was made in the mid 1920’s by Mary T. Douglas. The third list was published in Nov. 1980 by Mr. & Mrs. Robert H. Dows and Mr. & Mrs. William Souve. This list was made by combining the old lists and then correcting and adding to it including more lot information. This list was compiled by Richard T. Halsey in October 1988 with corrections sent by Diane Ham, Mendon Historian, in 2005. A special thanks to Cheri Branca for the numerous corrections that she sent in 2011.
  • New York Gravestones – Transcription, photos
  • FindAGrave – Transcriptions and Photos
  • Billion Graves – Transcriptions and photos

Meyer’s Cemetery, Mendon

See: Rochester Junction Cemetery, Mendon

Miller Cemetery, Mendon

  • Map It
  • Monroe County NYGenWeb – Transcription
    This list was made from three old lists. The first was made approximately 1920 and attributed to Mrs. Anah B. Yates. A second list was made Aug. 1939 by Mary Moulthrop and Myrte Rice Haynes. A third list was made by Marjorie S. Dows in Jan. 1978. Then a visit was made to the cemetery on March 5, 1988 and corrections made. Corrections sent by Diane Ham, Mendon Historian, in 2005.
  • FindAGrave – Transcriptions and Photos

Monroe Ave. Cemetery, Rochester

See: East Cemetery, Rochester

Moore Cemetery, Hamlin

See: Moore Family Cemetery, Hamlin

Moore Cemetery, Mendon

See: More Cemetery, Mendon

Moore Family Cemetery, Hamlin

This cemetery is approximately ¼ mile north of Roosevelt Highway (Route 18) on the East side of Redman Road. Remains of four broken stones still stand, otherwise the cemetery is very difficult to spot. It is around half an acre and is believed to hold the remains of approximately fifty area settlers. The first burial was in 1823, and the cemetery was abandoned for burial purposes in the 1870’s.

More Cemetery Mendon

Morgan Cemetery, Chili

West side of Scottsville Rd, about 1/2 mile south of the NY State Thruway.

Moul Road Cemetery, Parma

Moul Road, north part of town.

Internments:

  1. Moul, Helen, d. 1852.

Mount Hope Cemetery, Rochester

Mount Hope Cemetery was formally dedicated on October 3 1838 on 40 acres of ground purchased from Silas Andrus. Today it covers almost 200 acres and has over a third of a million permanent residents including many of Rochester’s most prominent pioneers, inventors, politicians and industrialists. It is one of America’s oldest active municipal burial grounds, continuing to grow at a rate of 200-300 burials per year.

Mount Olivet Cemetery, Sweden

Mount Olivet Cemetery is maintained by the Roman Catholic Parish of The Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary. It is located off of East Canal Road in Brockport NY.

Mount Pleasant Cemetery, Perinton

Mulliner Cemetery, Penfield

See: Griswold Cemetery, Penfield

Mumford Rural Cemetery, Le Roy, Wheatland

Established in 1805.

Nettleton Cemetery, Penfield

North Chili Rural Cemetery, Chili

North side of Buffalo Rd, between Union St and Roberts Wesleyan College. Established in 1886.

North Greece Cemetery, Greece

38 Peck Rd
Hilton, NY 14468

  • Map It
  • Monroe County NYGenWeb – Transcription
    The tombstones were copied on Aug. 19, 1931 by Mary T. Douglas and Myrte R. Haynes of the Irondequoit Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution. The inscriptions were corrected in summer of 1987 by Richard Halsey. He also made a visit to the cemetery on Sept. 24, 2005.
  • New York Gravestones – Transcription, photos
  • FindAGrave – Transcriptions and Photos

North Rush Cemetery, Rush

Located on the north side of State Route 251, about 1/2 mile east of E. River Rd. Established in 1825.

Number Six Cemetery, Rush

Poorly maintained early roadside cemetery, marked on public maps but appears to be on private ground. Also known variously as the McFarlen, Sibleyville, Palmer or Five Points Cemetery.

  • Map It
  • Monroe County NYGenWeb – Transcription
    The tombstones in this cemetery were copied twice before. About 1930 a list of inscriptions was made by Mary C. Douglas with help from Anna B. Yates, both of the Irondequoit Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution. Another list of inscriptions was made in 1939 by Mary Moulthrop and Myrte Rice Haynes, also of the same D.A.R. Chapter. A combined list was made from these earlier records and a visit to the cemetery was made on September 25, 1992 by Richard T. Halsey and corrections and four additions were made to the master list.
  • FindAGrave – Transcriptions and Photos

Oakwood Cemetery, Penfield

  • Map It
  • Official Website
    During the summer of 2014, photographs and transcriptions were collected for lots 1-367 as part of an Eagle Scout Project.  The scout was a member of Troop 230 in Penfield, NY chartered by the First Baptist Church of Penfield.

  • Monroe County NYGenWeb – Transcription
    • Burial Records
      The Oakwood Cemetery Association approved sharing their collection of burial records via these web pages. This collection of web pages contains over 15,600 burial records up until the end of Oct. 2014. The amount of information collected varied over the years but most include the date of interment and who purchased the burial lot.
    • Cemetery Map 1
    • Cemetery Map 2
  • New York Gravestones – Transcription, photos
  • FindAGrave – Transcriptions and Photos

Oatka Cemetery, Wheatland

Oatka Cemetery is located in the Town of Wheatland on the south side of Scottsville-Mumford Road (Route 383), just to the west of the Village of Scottsville, NY.

Old Burial Ground, Bushnell Basin

See: Bushnells Basin Cemetery, Bushnell Basin

Old Catholic Cemetery, Clarkson

This cemetery was used by the Church of Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary in Brockport from about 1856 to 1892 when the Church opened Mt. Olivet Cemetery. This abandoned cemetery is now on private property. It was abandoned in 1930 and bulldozed in 1950. Some interments were moved to other cemeteries. In the early 1990s an earthen berm was constructed and most remaining tombstones were cemented into place on the berm.

St. Mary’s is difficult to find. There is a dirt road running north off of East Avenue into the woods. That dirt road is between the Seymour Library and the sewage treatment plant. 18Halsey, Dick. New Local Cemetery Records, published in Dick’s Genealogy & History Corner. 2013

Old Mendon Cemetery, Mendon

Located on the east side of the Pittsford – Mendon Road, north of the hamlet of Mendon

  • Map It
  • Monroe County NY USGenWeb Archives – Transcription
  • Monroe County NYGenWeb – Transcription
    It is important to note that the old lists of inscriptions for this cemetery are not correct. In the Aug. 14, 1921 issue of the Honeoye Falls Times was published a list by Mrs. Anah B. Yates that said that it was from “Old Mendon Grounds.” This was later written that all the persons on the list were buried in the Old Mendon Cemetery when in fact the persons on the list were buried in many small cemeteries in the Town of Mendon. Thus the list by Mary T. Douglas dated June 10, 1931 and the list done in 1939 by Mary Moulthrop and Myrte Rice Haynes both contain many inscriptions that are in other cemeteries. This list was compiled by Richard T. Halsey in October 1988 with corrections sent by Diane Ham, Mendon Historian, in 2005.
  • FindAGrave – Transcriptions and Photos

Old Rush Cemetery, Rush

Orchard Cemetery, Greece

See: Wagner Farm Cemetery, Greece.

Orthadox Friends Shadbolt Farm Cemetery, Wheatland

See: Quaker Cemetery, Wheatland

Our Mothers of Sorrows Cemetery, Greece

A wooden structure called St. Ambrose Church was established in 1829. A new brick building was constructed in 1860 and the name was changed to Our Mother of the Seven Sorrows Church. Through the years, it has been shortened to Mother of Sorrows. The present Church was built in 1966. In 1969, the 1860 structure became a library for the Town of Greece. The cemetery is located between the old Church and the new Church. 19Monroe County NYGenWeb

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  • Monroe County NYGenWeb – Transcription 1
    The tombstones in this cemetery were copied in 1938 by Mrs. Fred. Fleming, Mrs. Lillian McKalvey Wright and Mrs. Myrtle Rice Haynes. A visit was made to the cemetery in 1987 by Richard Halsey and corrections and additions were made to the previous list.
  • Monroe County NYGenWeb – Transcription 2
    An Eagle Scout project by Evan Pierce
  • FindAGrave – Transcriptions and Photos

Palmer Cemetery, Rush

See: Number Six Cemetery, Rush

Park Road Cemetery, Parma

See: East Street Cemetery, Parma

Parma Corners Cemetery, Parma

Established in 1889.

Parma Union Cemetery, Parma

Since 1853, Parma Union Cemetery has been the townships public cemetery. Previous to the date, families usually buried their dead on their farms.

Certain residents of the Town of Parma, Having no convenient place for the burial of their dead, formed the Parma Union Cemetery Association.

Soon afterward, they voted to purchase 2 ½ acres from the southeast corner of the Loton Hitchcock farm on Parma Center Road. The land sold for the staggering sum of $300. – Shirley Cox Husted

Perinton Center Cemetery, Perinton

AKA: Center Cemetery

Early burial ground established in 1813 on land given by Lyman Baker.

Perrin Cemetery, Irondequoit

This cemetery is in the vacant lot beside the Irondequoit Presbyterian Church. 2881 Culver Road, Irondequoit.

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  • Interment records not known to have survived.

Pine Hill Cemetery, Parma

Located on Pine Hill Road.

Interments:

  1. Rall, Caroline.
  2. Rall, Jane, d. 1853.
  3. Rall, Wrangle, d. 1851.

Pine Hill Cemetery, Rush

Established in 1863

  • Map It
  • Monroe County NYGenWeb – Transcription
    Inscriptions copied by Mrs. Celia Greene Larkin of LeRoy, Genesee County, New York. This record has additional dates from the cemetery caretaker’s records and family Bibles, town records, names of parents and former residents. Credit must also be given to earlier work done while inscriptions were more legible by Mrs. Annah Yates and Mrs. Sanford Douglas of the Irondequoit Chapter of the D.A.R. in Rochester. They had many records which are now gone or unreadable.

  • FindAGrave – Transcriptions and Photos

Pineview Cemetery

Pioneer Burying Ground, Penfield

See: Johnston Cemetery, Penfield

Pioneer Burying Ground, Pittsford

Pioneer burying ground of Northfield and Pittsford. First burial occurred in 1797.

  • Map It
  • Pittsford Township cemetery records – Transcription
  • Monroe County NYGenWeb – Transcription
    The tombstones in this cemetery were copied four times previous which made it possible to include those tombstone inscriptions that are no longer legible. Those old lists of tombstone inscriptions are: An eight page list made about 1910 by Anah B. Yates.; A four page list made about 1928 by an unknown person.; A seven page list made in 1940 by members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints.; A fourteen page list made in 1984 by Lois C. Wilson. Each of these lists had some inscriptions that were not in the other lists. All were combined into one master list and then a visit was made to the cemetery in Aug. 2000 by Richard T. Halsey to make corrections. When a tombstone inscription was not found; it is indicated.
  • FindAGrave – Transcriptions and Photos

Pioneer Cemetery, Ogden

This cemetery was bulldozed in 1955 by Mr. R. I. Page.

  • Monroe County NYGenWeb – Transcription
    The tombstones in this cemetery were copied in July 1934 by Mary Douglas and Myrte Rice Haynes of the Irondequoit Chapter (Rochester, NY) of the Daughters of the American Revolution.
  • Persons Buried in Ogden, NY
    This is a name index to persons buried in Ogden from 1803 to 2004, gleaned from headstones, cemetery records, and death records; indexed by Donald Specht. 2014 edition.

    • Addendum to Persons Buried in Ogden
      This is a companion to Persons Buried in Ogden and contains additional information gleaned from death and other records; indexed by Donald Specht.

Pioneer Cemetery, Rochester

Little is known about a pioneer cemetery once located near the intersection of Norton and St. Paul Boulevard. 20Thomas, W. Stephen and Rosenberg-Naparsteck, Ruth. Sleepers’ City, The Sesquicentennial History of Mt. Hope Cemetery. Published in Rochester History, vol. 1, Oct., 1988, No. 4.

Interment records not known to have survived.

Pioneer Hill Cemetery, Rush

Cemetery is located in some woods between 1115 and 1139 Rush – West Rush Road in the Town of Rush, New York. The cemetery is very overgrown and many of the tombstones have fallen over.

  • Monroe County NY USGenWeb Archives – Transcription
  • Monroe County NYGenWeb – Transcription
    In the July 8, 1911 issue of the Rochester Post-Express a combined list of tombstone inscriptions for this and two other cemeteries in Rush (Davis Cem. and Thomas Cem.) was pushlished by Anah B. Yates. This has confused people for these many years as to which persons are buried in which cemetery. This list should help to end the confusion. Another list of inscriptions was compiled by Mrs. Celia Green Larkin and Dr. Frances M. Witmer of the Te-car-na-wun-na Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution, LeRoy, NY. This list was compiled by Richard T. Halsey from a visit to the cemetery on June 6, 1992.
  • FindAGrave – Transcriptions and Photos

Pittsford Cemetery, Pittsford

38 Washington Road
Pittsford

The Main portion of the cemetery is the larger of the two segments and was established in 1842. It is situated between Washington Road and East Avenue (approximately opposite French Road) and is just outside the Pittsford Village limits. The land for Pittsford Cemetery East was purchased from a private individual in 1922.

Pleasant Hill Cemetery, Ogden

Established in 1823.

  • Map It
  • Monroe County NYGenWeb – Transcription
    This listing includes both tombstone inscriptions and burial records. At the Ogden Farmer’s Library was a hand-written list of burials created by an unknown person. Added to that was a list of tombstone inscriptions made in July 1928 by Mary T. Douglas of the Irondequoit Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution. A visit was made to the cemetery in September 2000 by Richard Halsey and some corrections and a few additions were made to this listing.

  • New Horizons Genealogy – Transcription
  • Persons Buried in Ogden, NY
    This is a name index to persons buried in Ogden from 1803 to 2004, gleaned from headstones, cemetery records, and death records; indexed by Donald Specht. 2014 edition.

    • Addendum to Persons Buried in Ogden
      This is a companion to Persons Buried in Ogden and contains additional information gleaned from death and other records; indexed by Donald Specht.
  • FindAGrave – Transcriptions and Photos

Plymouth Ave. Cemetery, Rochester

Plymouth and Spring Streets. First graveyard in downtown Rochester. Burials were transferred to the Buffalo Street Cemetery and later to Mt. Hope Cemetery.

Interment records not known to have survived.

Polly Cemetery, Sweden

See: Locust Cemetery, Sweden

Poorhouse Cemetery, Rochester

See: Almshouse Burial Ground, Rochester

Porters Corners Cemetery, Mendon

Quaker Cemetery, Henrietta

NW corner of Calkins Road and East Henrietta Rd.

Interment records not known to have survived.

Quaker Cemetery, Mendon

See: Friends Burial Ground, Mendon

Quaker Cemetery, Scottsville, Wheatland

On Quaker Road about 800 feet East of Bowerman Road and on the south side, next to the road. The Quaker Cemetery was bought in 1833 from Darius Shadbolt.

  • Map It
  • Monroe County NY USGenWeb Archives – Transcription
    Excerpts from “Early Rochester Family Records” by Anah Babcock Yates, originally published in the Post Express (Rochester NY) in 1911, with genealogical notes from the files of Edith Stokoe and Elbert H. T. Miller. The data are from gravestone inscriptions in the Quaker cemetery on Quaker Road in the Town of Wheatland, Scottsville, NY. There are no burial books, as such, for this cemetery and there are unmarked graves as was Quaker custom. It is believed that Mrs.Yates interviewed Thomas A. Stokoe in 1911 and obtained birth as well as death records from his knowledge. For burials after 1911 information was taken from monuments.
  • Monroe County NYGenWeb – Transcription
  • FindAGrave – Transcriptions and Photos

Rapids Cemetery, Rochester

86 Congress Ave
Rochester, NY 14619

A burial ground nearly as old as Hanford’s Landing Cemetery, The Rapids Cemetery, was established near the present day Brooks Avenue and Genesee Street. This served the settlement of “castletown,” at the fording place used by pioneers before the Main Street bridge was built in 1812. 21Thomas, W. Stephen and Rosenberg-Naparsteck, Ruth. Sleepers’ City, The Sesquicentennial History of Mt. Hope Cemetery. Published in Rochester History, vol. 1, Oct., 1988, No. 4.

Founded circa 1810, the one and one-quarter acre site was reserved for burials by the Wadsworth family and was until 1902 actually in the town of Gates prior to annexation by the City of Rochester; Congress Avenue was originally named Cemetery Road. The Rapids Cemetery Association was formed in 1883, and bought the land from the Wadsworth family. The RCA was short lived, with the last recorded city taxes being paid in 1900.

Redman Cemetery, Hamlin

See: Moore Family Cemetery, Hamlin

Ridge Road Cemetery, Greece

See: Falls Cemetery, Greece

Riga Cemetery, Riga

Established in 1806

  • Map It
  • Monroe County NYGenWeb – Transcription
    This listings was made by combining a listing made by Mrs. Mary H. Wells and Frances M. Witmer in 1931 and also a listing made by Mary Moulthrop and Myrte Rice Haynes in 1939. Visits were made to the cemetery in April 1997 by Richard Halsey to make corrections and additions.

  • FindAGrave – Transcriptions and Photos

Riga Center Cemetery, Riga

See: Riga Cemetery, Riga

Riverside Cemetery, Rochester

Riverview Cemetery, Henrietta

  • Map It
  • Monroe County NYGenWeb – Transcription
    This cemetery has been copied at least three times before. The earliest list was made by Mart T. Douglas in July 1928. The second list was made by Mary Moulthrop and Myrte Rice Haynes on Sept. 18, 1940. The third list was made in Nov. 1978 by Mr. & Mrs. William Souve and Mr. & Mrs. Robert Dows. This list was made by combining the three previous lists, each of which had some names that weren’t on the other lists, and then checked by a visit on May 25, 1989 by Richard Halsey.
  • New Horizons Genealogy – Transcription
  • Burial records from the Town of Henrietta, NY
    This is the database compilation of 3,604 burials in the Town of Henrietta. (Alphabetical by Last, First, MI) Not all are buried in Henrietta, in fact some are deaths of people from the Town of Henrietta that are buried in other Towns
  • FindAGrave – Transcriptions and Photos

Robb Cemetery, Webster

This cemetery is located between 242 and 256 East Main Street in the Village of Webster.

Rochester Junction Cemetery, Mendon

  • Map It
  • Monroe County NYGenWeb – Transcription
    These tombstones were Copied 1929 by Mrs. Celia Green Larkin & Dr. Frances M. Witmer, Te-car-na-wun-na Chapter D.A.R., LeRoy, N.Y.; assisted by Harold Warner Scott and then corrections and many additions were sent by Diane Ham, Mendon Historian, in 2005. In 2011 some corrections and additions to this list were made by Cheri Branca.
  • FindAGrave – Transcriptions and Photos

Rogers Cemetery, Irondequoit

Rogers Cemetery is located on Armstrong Ave. near St. Paul Boulevard. It is a very small plot of ground surrounded by a very fine iron fence. This ground was set aside by Ezra Rogers, brother of Hosea Rogers, as a family burial plot. There are about five or six graves there. One grave contains the body of Mr. Rogers’ dog, Fred, his favorite hunting dog. When the dog died, it is said that Mr. Rogers mourned many days. In a sentimental mood, he buried the dog in the cemetery and placed a marker on its grave. 22West, Maude I., Town Historian. Irondequoit Story: a history of the town of Irondequoit (suburb of Rochester, county of Monroe, state of New York) covering the years 1839-1957. Published by The Town of Irondequoit.

  • Gustafson, Robert J., M.S. Hooker Cemetery, Portland Avenue, Irondequoit, Monroe County, New York: burials 1813 to about 1910. vi, 9 leaves ; 28 cm. Published: 1992. includes burials in Rogers Cemetery.
  • FindAGrave – Photos

Rotzel Farm Cemetery, Rush

See: West Rush Cemetery, Rush

Sage Family Pioneer Cemetery, Parma

Sandy Hill Cemetery, Mendon

See: Tomlinson’s Corners Cemetery, Mendon

Schummers Cemetery, Perinton

Early burial ground, 1817-1928. Established on a one-acre tract of land given to the town by the Northrup family.

Shaffer Cemetery, Ogden

  • Map It
  • Monroe County NY USGenWeb Archives – Transcription
  • Monroe County NYGenWeb – Transcription
    Originally recorded by Mary T. Douglas of the Irondequoit Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution in June 1931. Minor corrections made from a visit to the cemetery by Richard T. Halsey on October 15, 1993.
  • New York Gravestones – Transcription, photos
  • Persons Buried in Ogden, NY
    This is a name index to persons buried in Ogden from 1803 to 2004, gleaned from headstones, cemetery records, and death records; indexed by Donald Specht. 2014 edition.

    • Addendum to Persons Buried in Ogden
      This is a companion to Persons Buried in Ogden and contains additional information gleaned from death and other records; indexed by Donald Specht.
  • FindAGrave – Transcriptions and Photos

Sibleyville Cemetery, Rush

See: Number Six Cemetery, Rush

Smith Cemetery, Penfield

  • Map It
  • Monroe County NYGenWeb – Transcription
    This list was made by incorporating the two earlier lists and visits to the cemetery in 1988 to check the validity of the earlier records. Also incorporated in this list are records from the official records of burial. The burial records begin April 25, 1901. The original records are kept at the Town Clerk’s Office and a copy of the burial records are kept at the Local History room of the Penfield Public Library. The original burial records contain the cause of death and the name of the undertaker, which are not included in this list.

  • FindAGrave – Transcriptions and Photos

Smith Family Cemetery, Parma

  • Map It
  • Monroe County NYGenWeb – Transcription
    This cemetery has been copied three times before. One list was made in 1928 by Mary T. Douglas. Another list was made in the mid 1930’s but it is not known by who. The third list was made by Mrs. Robert Dows on Sept. 24, 1978. These three lists were combined and then a visit was made to the cemetery by Richard T. Halsey on June 20, 1989 to check this list and one addition was made.
  • New Horizons Genealogy – Transcription
  • FindAGrave – Transcriptions and Photos
  • Billion Graves – Transcriptions and photos

Sophia Street Cemetery

Carved from the wilderness, Rochester had no established cemeteries that were a fitting memorial for the passing pioneers and numerous children carried off by illness. The first cemetery on the One Hundred Acre Tract was established on land donated by Nathaniel Rochester, William Fitzhugh and Charles Carroll. It was on Sophia (Plymouth Avenue) Street north of Spring Street, which at that time bordered on the wilderness. Edwin Scranton recalled that his mother said, “At last we have a nice grave yard.” For several nights after the first burial a night watch was kept for fear wolves might uncover the young wife of Dr. Gibbs. 23Thomas, W. Stephen and Rosenberg-Naparsteck, Ruth. Sleepers’ City, The Sesquicentennial History of Mt. Hope Cemetery. Published in Rochester History, vol. 1, Oct., 1988, No. 4.

Interments moved to West Cemetery, Rochester.

South Perinton Cemetery, Perinton

  • Map It
  • Monroe County NYGenWeb – Transcription
    The tombstone in this cemetery were copied in the summer of 1987 by Richard T. Halsey. The records of the Perinton Historical Society were checked and found to contain records of burials for persons without tombstones. Those burials records were also added into this master list. Further updates were added in 2011 from readings by Cheri Branca.
  • FindAGrave – Transcriptions and Photos

St. Boniface Roman Catholic Cemetery, Rochester

Located on Clinton Avenue South, opposite of St. Patrick’s Cemetery, in the Pinnacle Hills. Abandoned at the urging of Bishop Bernard McQuaid, for whom Holy Sepulchre Cemetery was a project of special significance. All burials in this cemetery were eventually moved to Holy Sepulchre. 24Thomas, W. Stephen and Rosenberg-Naparsteck, Ruth. Sleepers’ City, The Sesquicentennial History of Mt. Hope Cemetery. Published in Rochester History, vol. 1, Oct., 1988, No. 4.

Interments moved to Holy Sepulchre Cemetery, Rochester.

St. Casimirs Polish Catholic Cemetery, Rochester

St. Casimir’s Polish Catholic Cemetery was founded around 1908 and is still active, although there have been few burials in recent years. It is located in a narrow strip of land between the Rochester Wal-Mart supercenter and the 104 expressway, with the south entrance actually located on the Hudson Avenue exit ramp. It is locked and inaccessible during winter months. It is affiliated with St. Casimir’s Polish National Church.

St. Fechan’s Cemetery, Chili

See: St. Pius 10th Cemetery, Chili

St. John’s Roman Catholic Cemetery, Ogden

See: St. John the Evangelist Cemetery, Ogden

St. John the Evangelist Cemetery, Ogden

Evergreen Street, Spencerport Village

St. Joseph’s Roman Catholic Cemetery, Penfield

Established in 1866.

St. Joseph’s Roman Catholic Cemetery, Rochester

The church first had a small cemetery that opened in 1840 on Lyell Avenue at Mt. Read Blvd. This quickly filled and in 1843 another cemetery was opened off Goodman Street near the railroad tracks. The interments were moved to Holy Sepulchre in 1872.

St. Mary’s R. C. Cemetery, Wheatland

See: Holy Angels Cemetery, Wheatland

St. Mary’s Roman Catholic Cemetery, Clarkson

See: Old Catholic Cemetery, Clarkson

St. Mary’s Roman Catholic Cemetery, Perinton

  • Map It
  • Monroe County NYGenWeb – Transcription
    The tombstone in this cemetery were copied in the summer of 1987 by Richard T. Halsey. It is important to note that only tombstones from 1920 and before were copied. Then the records of the Perinton Historical Society were checked and found to contain records of burials for persons without tombstones. Those burials records were also added into this master list.
  • FindAGrave – Transcriptions and Photos

St. Patrick’s Roman Catholic Cemetery, Rochester

Located on Clinton Avenue South, opposite of St. Boniface’s Cemetery, in the Pinnacle Hills. Abandoned at the urging of Bishop Bernard McQuaid, for whom Holy Sepulchre Cemetery was a project of special significance. All burials in this cemetery were eventually moved to Holy Sepulchre. 25Thomas, W. Stephen and Rosenberg-Naparsteck, Ruth. Sleepers’ City, The Sesquicentennial History of Mt. Hope Cemetery. Published in Rochester History, vol. 1, Oct., 1988, No. 4.

Interments moved to Holy Sepulchre Cemetery, Rochester.

St. Paul’s Episcopal Church Columbarium

25 Westminster Road
Rochester, NY 14607

St. Paul’s Roman Catholic Cemetery, Mendon

See: St. Paul of the Cross Cemetery, Mendon

St. Paul of the Cross Cemetery, Honeoye Falls, Mendon

Sts. Peter and Paul’s Roman Catholic Cemetery, Rochester

732 Maple Street, Rochester. Was closed by the Rochester Common Council in March of 1876 for reasons of health. Approximately 1300 to 1500 burials were moved to Holy Sepulchre in 1898. 26Monroe County NYGenWeb.

Interments moved to Holy Sepulchre Cemetery, Rochester.

St. Pius 10th Cemetery, Chili

Located near the intersection of Chestnut Ridge Road and the south section of Golden Road, Chili, Monroe County, NY.

St. Vincent de Paul Roman Catholic Cemetery, Churchville

Saint Vincent de Paul Catholic Cemetery is located in the rear northeast sections of Creekside Cemetery in Churchville, although it is in fact a separate cemetery operated by the Diocese of Rochester. It does not have a separate entrance or a streetside sign. Enter either of the two main roads into Creekside Cemetery off Main Street and follow the internal signs to Saint Vincent de Paul.

Stone Cemetery, Rochester

East Avenue and Gibbs Street. On current site of Rochester Gas and Electic Building. Burials were removed to East Cemetery, then to Mt. Hope Cemetery.

Interments moved to Mount Hope Cemetery, Rochester.

Stryker Road Cemetery, Chili

See: Grange Hall Cemetery, Chili

Tanglewood Cemetery, Ogden

See: Whittier Cemetery, Ogden

Taylor Road Cemetery, Mendon

  • Map It
  • Monroe County NYGenWeb – Transcription
    Record taken August 1939 by Mary Moulthrop and Myrte Rice Haynes of the Irondequoit Chapter, N.Y.S.D.A.R., Rochester, New York. Corrections sent by Diane Ham, Mendon Historian, in 2005.
  • FindAGrave – Transcriptions and Photos

Thomas Cemetery, Rush

AKA: Fishell Cemetery

Small family cemetery – only three legible monuments in December 2012 – on Fishell Road in Rush, NY adjacent to Honeoye Creek.

  • Map It
  • Monroe County NY USGenWeb Archives – Transcription
  • Monroe County NYGenWeb – Transcription
    This list of inscriptions was made by combining a list made in 1929 by Mrs. Celia Green Larkin and Dr. Frances M. Witmer (with assistance by Harold Warner Scott) and also a list made in Aug. 1939 by Mary Moulthrop and Myrte Rice Haynes, along with a visit to the cemetery by Richard Halsey in July 1992.
  • FindAGrave – Transcriptions and Photos. Listed under Fishell Cemetery.
  • FindAGrave – Transcriptions and Photos. Listed under Thomas Cemetery.

Tinker Cemetery, Henrietta

496 Castle Rd
Rochester, NY 14623

A very well maintained small pioneer cemetery established in 1810, which contains the final resting places of many town pioneers including the Tinker, Olney and Maltby families. The land was deeded to the town on May 1, 1832 by Chandler Maltby, who is interred within its grounds. At the rear of the cemetery past the stones are many unmarked and fieldstone graves of early town settlers.

  • Map It
  • Monroe County NYGenWeb – Transcription
    This list was made by first combining the following previous lists of tombstones: A newspaper article in the Democrat & Chronicle of June 6, 1891; A newspaper article by Anah B. Yates in the Rochester Post-Express of Nov. 18, 1911.; A list of tombstone inscriptions made in the mid 1920’s by an unknown person.; A list of tombstone inscriptions made in 1928 by Mary T. Douglas. After making the combined list, a visit was made to the cemetery in 1990 by Richard T. Halsey. Corrections were made and ten inscriptions not recorded before were added.
  • Burial records from the Town of Henrietta, NY
    This is the database compilation of 3,604 burials in the Town of Henrietta. (Alphabetical by Last, First, MI) Not all are buried in Henrietta, in fact some are deaths of people from the Town of Henrietta that are buried in other towns.
  • FindAGrave – Transcriptions and Photos

Tomlinson’s Corners Cemetery, Mendon

  • Map It
  • Monroe County NYGenWeb – Transcription
    This list takes into account two previous lists of inscrptions. One list by Anah B. Yates was in the Honeoye Falls Times on March 31, 1921. The other list was made by Mary T. Douglas of the Irondequoit Chapter of the D. A. R. in November 1930. This list was compiled by Richard T. Halsey in August 1988 with corrections sent by Diane Ham, Mendon Historian, in 2005.
  • FindAGrave – Transcriptions and Photos

Tryon Cemetery, Rochester

Landing Road, near Schuyler’s Block House in Ellison Park.

Interment records not known to have survived.

Tyler Pioneer Cemetery, Parma

East Avenue, east of St. Paul’s Lutheran Church

Union Cemetery, Webster

See: Webster Union Cemetery, Webster

Union Hill Cemetery, Webster

Located on Ridge Road, east of Webster, close to Basket Road.

Valley View Cemetery, Rush

  • Monroe County NYGenWeb – Transcription
    All the names of the boys interred here and data on them came from an article in the Rochester Democrat & Chronicle on July 13, 2014 by David Andreatta, Staff writer.
  • FindAGrave – Transcriptions and Photos

Waffle Rd. Cemetery, Gates

Shown on maps from 1902 to 1924 but no known tombstones.

Wagner Farm Cemetery, Greece

Walker Cemetery, Hamlin

  • Map It
  • Monroe County NYGenWeb – Transcription
    This is a composite list of burials extracted from: list published in the Brockport Republic in 1890; a July 1928 survey compiled by D.A.R. member, Mary T. Douglas; a May 1939 survey compiled by D.A.R. members, Lula Smith and Myrte Rice Haynes; a survey by Hamlin Historical Society members, Peg Ryan, Linda Ryan & Nancy Martin in 1972; a survey compiled by Marjorie S. Dows on July 16, 1978.
  • FindAGrave – Transcriptions and Photos

Warnick Cemetery, Rush

See: Thomas Cemetery, Rush

Warren Cemetery, Wheatland

AKA: Canawaugus Cemetery.

Webster Cemetery, Rush

See: East Rush Cemetery, Rush

Webster Rural Cemetery, Webster

Webster Union Cemetery, Webster

345 Webster Road, Webster, New York

What is known today as Webster Union Cemetery, is the burial ground of the first Webster Settler. Abram Foster was laid to rest in 1859, at the age of 90. The first burial on the grounds was that of Benjamin Woodhull on August 23, 1820. Four years later, in 1824, the cemetery was established as a burial ground. On September 6, 1851 a meeting was held to organize a society called the Union Cemetery of Webster, New York. A certificate of corporation was issued to the society on March 4, 1898, designating the Cemetery a non-profit organization. Since this name caused frequent confusion between the Union Hill Cemetery, and the Union Cemetery of Webster, an official name change took place in April of 1954, to the present title of “Webster Union Cemetery.”

West Brighton Rural Cemetery, Rochester

  • Monroe County NYGenWeb – Transcription
    Compiled by Florence A. Field in 1982 from records of burials by Anah B. Yates as published in the Rochester Post-Express in 1911. Also from gravestone inscriptions copied by the D. A. R. members in 1931 and gravestone inscriptions left in the cemetery.
  • Interments moved to Mt. Hope Cemetery, Rochester.

West Cemetery, Rochester

A proper burial place was important to the early settlers but its exact nature was not agreed upon. The rapid growth of the village required larger burial grounds, so in 1821 the half-acre Sophia Street Cemetery was exchanged for a three-and-one-half acre tract on Buffalo (now Main Street West) Street. This West Burying Ground, earlier owned by Roswell Hart, was the final resting place of Col. Nathaniel Rochester who died in 1831. Expansion prompted the Common Council in 1859 to order the removal of interments from the West Burying Ground to Mt. Hope Cemetery to make way for a city hospital, now known as Rochester General Hospital. 27Thomas, W. Stephen and Rosenberg-Naparsteck, Ruth. Sleepers’ City, The Sesquicentennial History of Mt. Hope Cemetery. Published in Rochester History, vol. 1, Oct., 1988, No. 4.

West Clarkson Cemetery, Clarkson

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  • Monroe County NYGenWeb – Transcription
    This is a composite list compiled from: inscriptions copied Nov. 13, 1926 by Alberta B. Brennan; ledgers of the Harmon Monument Co., Brockport; inscriptions copied by Mary C. Douglas in the early 1930’s; The Pioneer History of Clarkson published in the Brockport Republic in 1890 (which added much personal information on persons buried here); a visit to the cemetery on July 8, 1989 by Richard T. Halsey.
  • FindAGrave – Transcriptions and Photos

West Greece Cemetery, Parma

See: Hoosick Hill Pioneer Cemetery, Parma

West Rush Cemetery, Rush

Located on the old Rotzel Farm south of West Rush, Monroe Co., NY. Turn left on Rotzel Road and drive up the hill. Park at the end of the paved road and walk up the gravel road at your left to the top of the hill. Established around 1810.

  • Monroe County NYGenWeb – Transcription
    This cemetery is on the old Rotzel Farm in West Rush, Monroe Co., NY. Go South on East River Road, past Rush–W. Rush Road. Turn left on Rotzel Road and drive up the hill. Park at the end of the paved road and walk up the gravel road at your left to the top of the hill. The cemetery is fenced in, with a lawn of grass and several huge trees. Many stones are lying face down, stacked up in piles, &/or leaning on trees. Not many are legible. These were read by June C. Feder in Sept. 1992. They are arranged here in family groups.
  • FindAGrave – Transcriptions and Photos

West Sweden Cemetery, Sweden

  • Map It
  • Monroe County NYGenWeb – Transcription
    The tombstones in this cemetery have been copied twice before. The first list was made on Aug. 6, 1934 by Mary Douglas and Myrte Rice Haynes. The other list was made Sept. 4, 1935 by Mrs. Edward D. Stewart. This list was made by combining the two previous lists, then a visit was made to the cemetery by Richard T. Halsey on July 6, 1989 and corrections and additions were made. Additional inscriptions were found that had been copied in the 1980s by Elizabeth Cook, and have been combined into the entire list.
  • New Horizons Genealogy – Transcription
  • FindAGrave – Transcriptions and Photos

West Webster Cemetery, Webster

1015 Maple Dr
Webster, NY 14580

In 1790, shortly after Oliver Phelps opened a land office in Canandaigua, New York, the Phelps and Gorham Purchase set aside one-half acre of land specifically for burials. Located at the corner of what are now Ridge Road and Maple Drive, this parcel eventually would be known as the West Webster Cemetery and the earliest cemetery in what would become the town of Webster, New York. On April 12, 1878, the cemetery was incorporated under the name of West Webster Cemetery Association

  • Map It
  • Official Website
  • Monroe County NYGenWeb – Transcription
    The tombstones in this cemetery were copied twice previously. The first list of inscriptions (9 pages) was taken by Mary T. Douglas (of the Daughters of the American Revolution) in July 1928. The second list of inscriptions (44 pages) was taken by Marjorie S. Dows and Dr. Virginia Moscrip (also of the Daughters of the American Revolution) in June 1965. In July 1988 these two lists were combined and then these were checked against the tombstones. Some minor corrections were made and approximately 600 other inscriptions were added to the list including many old inscriptions that were previously missed.
  • FindAGrave – Transcriptions and Photos

Westside Cemetery, Chili

Westside is located approximately 5 miles southwest of Grove Place Cemetery at the corner of Stryker and Chili-Scottsville Road, across from the Chili American Legion Post. The cemetery was officially opened and dedicated with a ceremony conducted by the Chili American Legion Post on Veteran’s Day 2008.

Wheatland Baptist Cemetery, Wheatland

Corner of Harmon and McGinnis Roads, Belcoda.

  • Map It.
  • Monroe County NYGenWeb – Transcription
    Records of burials compiled from the Burial Book of Wheatland Baptist Cemetery; Gravestone Inscriptions Gathered by the D. A. R.; Records of Monroe County Veteran’s Service Bureau; Excerpts from “Early Rochester Family Records” by Anah B. Yates that was published in the Rochester Post Express, December 2, 1911 copied from “A memorandum book kept by Joseph Blackmer of those persons who died and were buried in the burying ground near the Baptist meeting-house in Wheatland.”

  • FindAGrave – Photos
  • New Horizons Genealogy – Transcription
  • FindAGrave – Transcriptions and Photos

Wheatland Friends Cemetery, Wheatland

By 1887 all remains had been removed to other cemeteries with no records being made.

Whitaker Cemetery, Henrietta

  • Map It
  • Monroe County NYGenWeb – Transcription
    This list submitted after carefully going over stones, cleaning some with steel brush. Also checked against fifty year old list, which was in Post Express in 1920.
  • Burial records from the Town of Henrietta, NY
    This is the database compilation of 3,604 burials in the Town of Henrietta. (Alphabetical by Last, First, MI) Not all are buried in Henrietta, in fact some are deaths of people from the Town of Henrietta that are buried in other towns.
  • FindAGrave – Transcriptions and Photos

White Haven Memorial Park, Pittsford

210 Marsh Road

Pittsford, NY 14534

Whittier Cemetery, Ogden

  • Map It
  • Monroe County NYGenWeb – Transcription
    The tombstones in this cemetery have been copied at least twice before. About 1930, Mrs. Herbert Smith of the Irondequoit Chapter (Rochester) of the Daughters of the American Revolution copied the tombstones. In 1966, Mrs. Pearl D. Smith copied the tombstone inscriptions. She also was a member of the Irondequoit Chapter of the D. A. R. At that time, she mentions that the cemetery is very overgrown. During a visit about 1985, the weeds were about waist high. A visit to the cemetery on 7 Aug. 1999 by Richard Halsey was much more productive as the grass and weeds had been trimmed very closely.

  • Persons Buried in Ogden, NY
    This is a name index to persons buried in Ogden from 1803 to 2004, gleaned from headstones, cemetery records, and death records; indexed by Donald Specht. 2014 edition.

    • Addendum to Persons Buried in Ogden
      This is a companion to Persons Buried in Ogden and contains additional information gleaned from death and other records; indexed by Donald Specht.
  • FindAGrave – Transcriptions and Photos

Wolf Bridge Cemetery, Rush

See: Thomas Cemetery, Rush

Woodman Cemetery, Irondequoit

See: Bradstreet Cemetery, Irondequoit

Wright Cemetery, Parma

Wright Family Pioneer Cemetery, Parma

See: Wright Cemetery, Parma

Monroe County New York Burial Records

  • Burial records from the Town of Henrietta, NY
    This is the database compilation of 3,604 burials in the Town of Henrietta. (Alphabetical by Last, First, MI) Not all are buried in Henrietta, in fact some are deaths of people from the Town of Henrietta that are buried in other Towns
  • Persons Buried in Ogden, NY
    This is a name index to persons buried in Ogden from 1803 to 2004, gleaned from headstones, cemetery records, and death records; indexed by Donald Specht. 2014 edition.

    • Addendum to Persons Buried in Ogden
      This is a companion to Persons Buried in Ogden and contains additional information gleaned from death and other records; indexed by Donald Specht.

Footnotes:   [ + ]

1.Peck, Wiliam. History of Rochester and Monroe County New York, vol 1, pp. 69-70. New York and Chicago: The Pioneer Publishing Company. 1908.
2, 5, 6, 7, 9, 11, 12, 13, 20, 21, 23, 24, 25, 27.Thomas, W. Stephen and Rosenberg-Naparsteck, Ruth. Sleepers’ City, The Sesquicentennial History of Mt. Hope Cemetery. Published in Rochester History, vol. 1, Oct., 1988, No. 4.
3.Monroe County NYGenWeb.
4, 8, 15, 22.West, Maude I., Town Historian. Irondequoit Story: a history of the town of Irondequoit (suburb of Rochester, county of Monroe, state of New York) covering the years 1839-1957. Published by The Town of Irondequoit.
10.Parker, Jane Marsh. Rochester: A Story Historical, 1884.
14.History, About Holy Sepulchre Cemetery. http://www.holysepulchre.org/about/history : Accessed 4/6/2016.
16.Monroe NYGenWeb.
17.Monroe County NYGenWeb
18.Halsey, Dick. New Local Cemetery Records, published in Dick’s Genealogy & History Corner. 2013
19.Monroe County NYGenWeb
26.Monroe County NYGenWeb.