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Bristol Vermont – Manufacturing Interests

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At the head of the manufacturing interests of Bristol is the Bristol Manufacturing Company, which was originally established under the firm name of Howden, Daniels & Co., for the purpose of manufacturing coffins and caskets in a small way. This limited business steadily increased, and in 1867 the firm name was changed to Howden, Bosworth & Co., and on January 1, 1877, a stock company was formed under the title of the Bristol Manufacturing Company, with W. S. Howden, president, and D. Beckwith, secretary and treasurer. The original capital of $25,000 was subsequently increased to $46,000, while to the original business was added that of manufacturing sash, doors and blinds and general jobbing. The company has a fine water power and four buildings, with sheds, etc., embracing a sawmill, wood-factory, two finishing shops, dry-house, office, storage rooms, etc. The works employ from fifty to sixty hands, and the annual sales amount to about $66,000, and are constantly increasing. The goods are sold principally in New York and New England.

R. D. Stewart’s grist-mill on South street, operated by W. I. Rider, has three run of stones and all modern improvements. The mill was partially destroyed by the freshet of 1869, a short time previous to which it became Mr. Stewart’s property, and he rebuilt it soon after.

F. Greenough, blacksmith and wagon-maker, began business here in 1878. Octave Cushman, blacksmith and wheelwright, has been in business here about twenty years. N. McIntyre, blacksmith and wagon-maker, has been here since 1867. J. H. Wright, carriage-maker, has been here since 1850. Ira T. Eastman and William Battles are harness-makers, the former having been here since 1865.

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