History of Sherburne New York

Discover your
family's story.

Enter a grandparent's name to get started.

choose a state:
Start Now

SHERBURNE was formed from Paris, Oneida county, March 5, 1795, and its name is said to have been suggested by a member of the Legislature, who affirmed that the early inhabitants were in the frequent habit of singing the tune of Sherburne, which was a great favorite with them. It originally embraced the town of Smyrna, (Stafford,) which was taken off March 25, 1808. It was enlarged by the annexation of a small part of New Berlin in 1852. It lies upon the north border of the county, east of the center, and is bounded on the north by Hamilton, Madison county, on the south by New Berlin and North Norwich, on the east by Columbus, and on the west by Smyrna. The highest elevations are from 200 to 500 feet above the valleys of the streams. Chenango River enters the town near the north-west corner and flowing in a south-easterly direction leaves it near the center of the south border, receiving in its course through the town Handsome, Mad and Nigger brooks from the east and Pleasant brook and several smaller streams from the west.

It is underlaid by the rocks of the Hamilton, Portage and Ithaca groups, which have been sufficiently referred to in connection with the geology of the county. The soil is chiefly a gravelly and slaty loam, but in the valleys, especially that of the Chenango, along which are fine alluvial flats, rich and fertile, a sandy loam prevails to some extent. It is well adapted both to grass and grain. When first settled the town was timbered with beech, birch, hickory, ash, elm, basswood, oak, chestnut, hemlock and maple, the latter of which furnished the early settlers with sugar. Dairying forms the chief industry, though hops are extensively raised along the river. There are five creameries and two butter factories in the town, the former of which–the creameries–are owned by White, Smith & Co., of Sherburne; and one of the latter by Skinner & Thompson and the other by Ira Palmer.

The Utica, Chenango and Susquehanna Valley Railroad crosses the western portion of the town, making an extensive detour to connect with Sherburne village. The Chenango canal crosses the town through the valley of the river.

The population of the town in 1875 was 2,940; of whom 2,664 were native, 276 foreign, 2,923 white, 17 colored, 1,452 males and 1,488 females. Its area was 27,927 acres; of which 23,466 were improved; 4,457 woodland, and 4 otherwise unimproved. The cash value of farms was $1,706,375; of farm buildings other than dwellings, $211,900; of stock, $246,805; of tools and implements, $48,024. The amount of gross sales from farms in 1874 was $185,144. There are seventeen common and one Union Free School districts in the town. During the year ending Sept. 30, 1877, there were twenty-one licensed teachers at one time during twenty-eight weeks or more.

The number of children of school age residing in the districts at that date was 848. During that year there were twelve male and twenty-five female teachers employed; the number of children residing in the districts who attended school was 627, of whom six were under five or over twenty-one years of age; the average daily attendance during the year was 375.555; the number of volumes in district libraries was 1,974, the value of which was $1,904; the number of schoolhouses was eighteen, seventeen of which were frame and one brick, which, with the sites, embracing 5 acres and 52 rods, valued at $2,672, were valued at $14,780; the assessed value of taxable property in the districts was $1,485,972. The number of children between eight and fourteen years of age residing in this district at that date was 217, of whom 176 attended district school and 1 a private school during fourteen weeks of that year.

Receipts and Disbursements for School Purposes:

Amount on hand Oct. 1, 1876 $ 142.30
” apportioned to districts 2,375.09
Proceeds of Gospel and school lands 131.76
Raised by tax 2,712.89
From teachers’ board 219.00
From other sources 289.59

Total receipts $5,870.63

Paid for teachers’ wages $4,975.19
” libraries 89.60
” school apparatus 7.79
” school-houses, sites, fences, outhouses, repairs, furniture, etc 232.48
Paid for other incidental expenses 450.24
Amount remaining on hand Oct. 1, 1877 115.33

Total disbursements $5,870.63

Earlville and Sherburne Four Corners are situated, the former in the north-west and the latter the south-west corner of the town. Notice of the former will be found in connection with the town of Hamilton, in which about two-thirds of the village lies; and the latter, which is situated in four towns, in connection with the town of North Norwich.



MLA Source Citation:

Smith, James H. History of Chenango and Madison Counties, New York. Syracuse, NY: D. Mason & Co. 1880. AccessGenealogy.com. Web. 24 November 2014. http://www.accessgenealogy.com/new-york/history-of-sherburne-new-york.htm - Last updated on May 28th, 2013


Categories:
Topics:
Locations: ,

Contribute to the Conversation!

Our "rules" are simple. Keep the conversation on subject and mind your manners! If this is your first time posting, we do moderate comments before we let them appear... so give us a while to get to them. Once we get to know you here, we'll remove that requirement.

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Newsletter Signup

We currently provide two newsletters. Why not take both for a run?

Genealogy Update: We send out this newsletter whenever we feature a new, or significantly updated, collection or database on our website.

Circle of Nations: We send out this newsletter whenever we feature a new (or significantly updated) Native American collection or database on our website.

Once you've clicked on the Subscribe button above you'll receive an email from us requesting confirmation. You must confirm the email before you will be able to receive any newsletter.

Connect With Us!

Pin It on Pinterest

Shares
Share This

Share This

Share this post with your friends!