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Biography of Henry H. Crowell

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Henry H. Crowell, a prosperous lumber merchant of Hopkinton, was born in that town, July 9, 1834, son of Albert A. and Lydia (Kimball) Crowell. Joseph Crowell, came from Bradford, Mass., and settled on Beach Hill about one hundred years ago. Albert Crowell, who was born on the aforesaid hill, about fifty years ago settled at Ferrington’s Corner, on the farm where Eli Boutwell now lives. He ran the old saw-mill of the primitive up and down style, doing a custom business; and the mill industry has been in the hands of the Crowell family there ever since. He died at the age of sixty-two. His wife, also a native of Hopkinton, now, at the age of eighty-two, lives with her son. Of their six boys Lewis E. was killed in the Civil War by a shell at Spottsylvania. Three of the others were in the Burden Sharpshooters. Henry H. served two years and nine months. He was in all the battles of the regiment from the second battle of Bull Run. Another of the brothers, O. W. Crowell, is the famous evangelist singer, now travelling, and engaged in that work. The talent for vocal music, which is not wholly confined to this son, was an inheritance from their mother.

Henry H. Crowell remained with his father until he was twenty-one, working out in the summers. In 1868 he bought his present mill near Ferrington Corners. He had at first a grist-mill, a clapboard, lath, shingle, and upright saw-mill. In 1869 a great freshet carried the grist-mill and all its belongings down stream. He then rebuilt, and put in new machinery. His neighbors aided him in building the dam; and he now has a circular saw for lumber, besides a shingle-mill. The same plant has been worked now for twenty-eight years. With the exception of three years spent in the army Mr. Crowell has been in the mill business for forty-eight years. He often effects a profitable transaction by buying stumpage and clearing off the lumber. Adjoining his comfortable residence is a small farm. He is quite actively identified with social organizations, and has held public office. All the chairs of Colonel Putnam Post, No. 5, G. A. R., have been occupied by him; and he attended the Boston and Portland National Encampments of the organization. He was a charter member of Union Grange, No. 56, Patrons of Husbandry, and served in nearly all the chairs, including that of Master. In 1878, 1879, and 1880 he was Collector of Taxes; and he has been Selectman for six years. In 1876-77 he was a Representative in the State legislature, and was active in committee work. He has been a Justice of the Peace for thirty years. A stanch Republican, he is interested in local politics. He cast his first vote for Fremont, and he has voted that ticket ever since. Both he and his family belong to the Congregational church.

Mr. Crowell was married in 1858 to Lucinda M. Currier, who died in 1874. In 1876 he married Melinda J. Burroughs, of Bow, N.H. The children of the first marriage were: Lewis Albert, who died in childhood; Frank, who also died young; Etta M., who became the wife of Charles P. Goodwin; and George H., who died at the age of twenty-eight. By the second union there is a daughter, Lilian L., now nineteen years old, who is a music teacher.

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