Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek

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A treaty of perpetual friendship, cession and limits entered into by John H. Eaton and John Coffee, for and in behalf of the Government of the United States and the Mingos, Chiefs, Captains and Warriors of the Choctaw Nation, being held at Dancing Rabbit Creek on the fifteenth of September in the year eighteen hundred and thirty.

Article 14. Each Choctaw head of a family being desirous to remain and become a citizen of the States, shall be permitted to do so, by signifying his intention to the Agent within six months from the ratification of this Treaty, and he or she shall thereupon be entitled to a reservation of one section of six hundred and forty acres of land, to be bounded by sectional lines of survey; in like manner shall be entitled to one half that quantity for each unmarried child which is living with him over ten years of age; and a quarter section to such child as may be under 10 years of age, to adjoin the location of the parent. If they reside upon said lands intending to become citizens of the States for five years after the ratification of this Treaty, in that case a grant in fee simple shall issue; said reservation shall include the present improvement of the head of the family, or a portion of it. Persons who claim under this article shall not lose the privilege of a Choctaw citizen, but if they ever remove are not to be entitled to any portion of the Choctaw annuity.

See Further:

  1. Treaty With The Choctaw, September 27, 1830 – This will have the complete treaty.

This section of our website is being created for those who have searched in vain for their Mississippi Choctaw Ancestors.  Many knowledgeable people have contributed information to help you find these missing ancestors.  Because of the controversy of the Article 14 Claimants it may not be possible to establish tribal affiliation, but with the help of so many it may be possible to prove that your family was indeed Native American.

We are providing the information we find here to give you the opportunity to search the best possible places to find your ancestors.  Many articles, books and lists have been made in regards to the Mississippi Choctaw and we are finding more as we search. In time hopefully you will find the information you need to establish your family connection.

We are providing you with many forms of research, places to search, how to search, most of us do not do research for others, but can provide you with names of people who do research for a fee.

  • Choctaw Mixed Bloods and the Advent of Removal
    Choctaw Mixed Blood and the Advent of Removal: This dissertation by Samuel James Wells lists the names and families of the known mixed bloods and examines their role in tribal history, especially regarding land treaties during the Jeffersonian years preceding Removal. This dissertation includes a database of over three thousand names of known and probable mixed bloods drawn from a wide range of sources and therefore has genealogical as well as historical value.
  • Col. William Wards Register
    Colonel William Ward was appointed United States agent to register Choctaw Indians according to Article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, September 1830. The treaty was ratified February 24, 1831 and the six month time limit for those wishing to remain ended August 24, 1831. The registration procedure resulted in numerous "contingent claims" by members of the Choctaw Nation.
  • Rights of Mississippi Choctaws in the Choctaw Nation
    Memorial Of The Full-Blood Mississippi Choctaws Relative To Their Rights In The Choctaw Nation
  • Armstrong Rolls
    Search and understand the Armstrong Rolls as they relate to your Choctaw ancestor. Each Choctaw head of a family being desirous to remain and become a citizen of the States, shall be permitted to do so, by signifying his intention to the Agent within six months from the ratification of this Treaty, and he or she shall thereupon be entitled to a reservation of one section of six hundred and forty acres of land, to be bounded by sectional lines of survey; in like manner shall be entitled to one half that quantity for each unmarried child which is living with him over ten years of age; and a quarter section to such child as may be under 10 years of age, to adjoin the location of the parent. If they reside upon said lands intending to become citizens of the States for five years after the ratification of this Treaty, in that case a grant in fee simple shall issue; said reservation shall include the present improvement of the head of the family, or a portion of it. Persons who claim under this article shall not lose the privilege of a Choctaw citizen, but if they ever remove are not to be entitled to any portion of the Choctaw annuity.
  • Mississippi Choctaw Indians to whom Patents were Issued
    List of Mississippi Choctaw Indians to whom Patents were Issued for Land under the provisions of Article 14 of the Treaty of September 27, 1830 (Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek) (7 Stat. L./ 333-335)
  • List of Mississippi Choctaw, Who Received Scrip in Lieu of Land
    List of Mississippi Choctaw Indians in whose behalf scrip was issued under the provisions of the act of Congress of Aug. 23, 1842 {5 Slat. L., 518), in lieu of land to which they were entitled under article 14 of the treaty of Sept. 27, 1830 (7 Stat. L., 333-335).
  • Identified Mississippi Choctaw in 1902
    List of persons whose names appear on Identification Roll of Mississippi Choctaws prepared by the Commission to the Five Civilized Tribes, and approved by the Secretary of the Interior under the provisions of the Act of June 28, 1898 (30 Stat. L.,495) but who were not enrolled on the final rolls of the Mississippi Choctaws entitled to allotments in the Choctaw Nation under the provisions of the Act of July 1, 1902 (32 State. L.,641).
  • McKennon Roll
    In 1896-1897 the Kern-Clifton Roll was created to fill in the omissions of the Wallace Roll. Proposed Legislation for the Full-blood and identified Choctaws of Mississippi, Louisiana, and Alabama: Memorial Evidence and Brief published I believe in 1913.
  • Mississippi Choctaw Claims
    Statement of the delegates of the Mississippi, Alabama and Louisiana Choctaw Council with reference to the following subjects: First the nature of their claims. Second the proposed legislation now pending before Congress. Third the need for relief. Fourth, the approval of their general contract.
    • Mississippi Choctaw Claims 1933
      The 1933 Mississippi Choctaw Claimants came from the National Archives and was posted in the newspaper in Biloxi/Gulfport, Mississippi, in November of 1935.

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MLA Source Citation:

AccessGenealogy.com. Web. 19 November 2014. http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/treaty-of-dancing-rabbit-creek.htm - Last updated on Oct 4th, 2013


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