Surname Wagoner to Young

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Wagoner, Tenny (born in 1865).
Choctaw or Chickasaw freedman. Files: Part II, Exhibit F, report March 3, 1909. This woman claims to have Indian and Negro blood, but she asks only for enrollment as a freedman. She says that her mother was a slave, and it is probable she was also. Her failure to secure enrollment seems to have been due to the fact that application was not made for her in due time.
Number of claimants in this memorandum, 1.

Walker, ________.
Cherokee by blood. Files: Report Acting Commissioner to Five Civilized Tribes. January 13, 1910, addressed to Hon. J. George Wright.
Walker, child of James and Takey Walker, Cherokees. No application of record.
Number of claimants in this memorandum, 1.

Wall, Samuel C., et al.
Thompson, Giles.
Wall, Noah.
Offspring and descendants of Choctaws by birth, being descendants of white persons who were adopted as citizens of the Choctaw Nation prior to treaty of 1866. Files: See records of Indian Office and report March 3, 1909. Giles Thompson and Noah Wall became citizens of the Choctaw Nation prior to the treaty of 1830, and their names are mentioned in article 2 of the supplementary articles thereof. They were unquestionably citizens of the Choctaw Nation at the date of said treaty, which guaranteed that the lands conveyed thereby should inure to the members of the Choctaw Nation and their “descendants.” After the Choctaws migrated west they continued to form a part of the tribe, and Giles Thompson, at least, was officially recognized in various ways thereafter, his name appearing In the Choctaw laws. The slaves of Giles Thompson were enrolled and are now sharing in the lands of the Choctaw Nation by reason of the fact that their muster was a citizen of said nation. His children consider it very unjust that they have not been accorded even the privileges of his slaves. The right of the offspring of these persons was denied on the mistaken assumption that their rights were subject to the same rules as tho offspring of white parents who acquired Choctaw and Chickasaw citizenship subsequent to the tribal acts of 1875 and 1876, under which the right of citizenship became personal only. This case includes William J. Thompson and his sister, Myrtle Randolph, and others. Number of claimants in this memorandum approximate 10.

Ward, John, et al.
York, nee Ward, Sarah, et al.
Choctaws by adoption or Cherokees by blood. Files: Indian Office records; see files of Commissioner to Five Civilized Tribes; also Part I, Exhibit F. report March 3, 1900. Mr. Ward and his sister. Mrs. York, claim to be Choctaws by descent from an adopted citizen, being the children of one Samuel Ward, who acquired Choctaw citizenship by Intermarriage in 1848. Their mother, who was of Cherokee and white descent, was the second wife of the said Samuel Ward. The other claimants are related to them lineally, and perhaps collaterally, and by marriage. All claim that the Choctaw Nation is their home, alleging that all their interests are there, and that such interests represent the efforts of a lifetime. It is represented on behalf of Mr. Ward and his sister that they are persons of excellent standing in their community, and that they have considered themselves citizens of the Choctaw Nation for many years and have always acted as such. It is alleged, and probably is true, that John Ward has held important offices under the Choctaw Nation, and has been recognized in many ways as a citizen thereof, having been one of the most potent forces for law and order in said nation. The applicants claim that inasmuch as Samuel Ward was a citizen by intermarriage prior to the treaty of 1866. he acquired, by virtue of article 38 thereof, exactly the status of a native-born Choctaw or Chickasaw. Their case was disposed of by Commissioner to Five Civilized Tribes in January, 1907, according to the ruling of the department in another case which was not analogous to this one. Their cases were not acted upon by the department until March 4, 1907, and were then disposed of in a blanket decision involving 48 cases, which included practically all classes of applicants in the Choctaw Nation. Under the Opinion of the Assistant Attorney General for the Interior Department in the case of the Bacon children, John Ward and his sister were, the facts conceded, probably entitled to enrollment. Their case is to be distinguished from that of the children of parents who acquired citizenship under the Choctaw-Chickasaw acts of 1875-76, because said acts contain provisions not found in said article 38, treaty of 1866. The claims of the other parties to these cases are different, but all are so closely related that the whole matter should
be reviewed.
Number of claimants in this memorandum, 28.

Washington (or Waters or Dansby), Kate.
Chickasaw by blood. Statement of David Washington at Atoka. November 10, 1908. Part I, Exhibit F. report of March 3. 1909. It is alleged that this woman is the daughter of Charley Dansby, and that his degree of Chickasaw blood was one-half or more. Also, that no application was made for her enrollment because her first husband, who had charge of the matter, was a person of weak mind, or of little ability, and lacked sufficient ability and intelligence to attend to business matters.
Number of claimants in this memorandum. 1.

Washington, Melvina.
Choctaw by blood. Files: Part III, report of March 3,1909. This woman claims that she was born in the Indian Territory in 1869 or 1870, and that her parents were free persons. She says that her father, whose name was Phillip Battiest, was a full-blood Choctaw: that her mother, whose name was Nancy Chukmubbe, was part negro and part Indian, find that the latter was a free woman when she (Melvina) was born. The claimant also alleges that she has never been out of the Indian Territory to live.
Number of claimants in this memorandum, 1.

Wesley, Ada. et al.
Creeks by blood. Including Ada Wesley, Simon West, and a stepdaughter of David Hill, of Okemah, Okla., and a child of Prince Taryolle, of Morse, Okla., the Christian names of the last two being unknown to the department at this time: all are minors.
Number of claimants, 4.

West (nee Shockley), Loula, et al.
Shockley, Mattie, et al.
Choctaws by blood. Files: Records of Indian Office. These families were denied enrollment under circumstances which entitle them to remedial legislation, and I therefore recommend that the facts be brought to the attention of Congress. They were adjudged entitled to enrollment by various officers and tribunals, including the Secretary of the Interior, hut their names were not actually inscribed on rolls approved by him. A few days before the close of the enrollment work the Secretary rescinded the favorable decision theretofore rendered by him. This was done without notice to the applicant, pursuant to an opinion rendered by the Attorney General February 19, 1907 (26 Ops. A. G., 127. 150), based upon the fact that a decision was rendered by the Choctaw-Chickasaw Citizenship Court, at one stage of the enrollment work, denying their right to enrollment. The final adverse action of the Secretary was taken during a period when there was great hurry, confusion, and uncertainty. There was not sufficient time to deliberate over matters or to reconsider cases. But if there had been a little time for reflection it would have been apparent—as it now is—that his action was due to mistake or oversight in the preparation of said opinion. I base this statement on a report rendered by the Attorney General March 4, 1907. to the President. The latter directed the Secretary of the Interior to treat this report as a formal opinion. Unfortunately it did not reach the Interior Department until March 4, 1907, too late to he of any use in the enrollment work. It resulted from the fact that a very meritorious case was brought to the attention of the President by Senator Curtis and others of a man who was stricken from the approved rolls in supposed compliance with the opinion of February 19, 1907, supra. In that case the man was originally adjudged entitled to enrollment by the Dawes Commission. An appeal was taken by the Choctaw Nation to the United States court, and he was again successful. As he had judgments in his favor by both tribunals, the Attorney General advised the President that, concurring with Senator Curtis and Mr. Harr, he considered that the man was not required by law to transfer his case to the citizenship court and that the opinion of February 19, 1907, had no application to such persons, The case of the Shockley and West families was precisely the same, except that, being ignorant or uncertain as to their duty, they submitted their cases to the citizenship court. This was done, however, under protest. Moreover, Indians should not be bound by such a mistake. Favorable decisions and recommendations have been made as to these applicants as follows: (1) July 15, 1889, decision by United States Indian agent: (2) January 8, 1890, recommendation by Commissioner of Indian Affairs; (3) January 9, 1890, decision by Secretary of the Interior: (4) December 5, 1896, decision by Dawes Commission: (5) August 30, 1897, decision by United States court, on appeal: (6) February 10, 1905. opinion by Assistant Attorney General, Interior Department, approved by Secretary; (7) December 8, 1905, opinion by Assistant Attorney General, Interior Department, approved by Secretary: (S) March 19, 1906, decision by Commissioner to the Five Civilized Tribes: (9) December 22, 1906, recommendation by Commissioner of Indian Affairs; (10) January 7, 1907, decision by Secretary of the Interior. Mr. Pollock and Gen. Webster are familiar with the West cases. The latter prepared the opinions referred to above (see Nos. 6 and 7). and the former approved them. I have met and conversed with Mrs. West and her children. The family bus the appearance of being of Indian blood.
Number of applicants, approximately, 12.

Westbrook, Thomas A.
Chickasaw by blood. Number of claimants, 1.

White, Tommy, et al. (M. C. R. 4363).
Mississippi Choctaw. Files: Part IV. Exhibit F, report March 3, 1909. These people are full-blood Choctaws. The parents were identified as such by the Dawes Commission. It was learned by the commission, in connection with this case, that there were children who were also entitled to Identification as full bloods, and an effort was made through an Interpreter to secure their names, but without avail. In this case, as in others, the parents were suspicious of the Government officials and would not appear before them.
Number of claimants In this memorandum, 5.

Wiggins, Celia. Post office: Depew, Okla.
Creek by blood. Files: Claimant’s letter of May 25, 1905, on file in Indian Office. This woman claims to be a three-fourths-blood Indian. She alleges that her father was a full-blood Creek and that her mother was a half-blood Indian.
Number of claimants in this memorandum, 1.

Williams, Dina (minor).
Williams, Bettie (minor).
Williams, Chosley (minor).
Creeks by blood. Files: Letter of December 18, 1908. from Fred S. Cook, district agent, Checotah, Okla. See Exhibit F. Part IV. report March 3, 1909. Mr. Cook reports that these persons are full-blood Indians who, through ignorance or mistake, have been left off the approved rolls, and that their parents belong to the Snake faction of Indians, and that their cases should be given every consideration for the reason that their said parents, owing to their affiliation with the Snakes, prevented the enrollment of these children and the allotment of land to them. They are the children of Cinda Williams and Big Williams, and their ages are 12, 8, and 6 years, respectively.
Number of claimants in this memorandum, 3.

Williams, Margaret.
Chickasaw by blood. Claims to be the daughter of a full-blood Chickasaw named Thomas Mikey, alias Che-mikey, by a free woman of color. Seeks transfer from freedman to blood rolls. Number of claimants, 1.

Williams, Sallie. (9-R-22.) (I. T. D., 5840, 15434-1906) Post office: Katie, Okla.
Williams, Marcus.
Williams, Cora.
Williams, Kimble.
Williams, Maise.
Williams, Joe.
Williams, Lyman.
Chickasaws by blood. File: Part I of report of March 3, 1909. Sallie Williams, principal applicant. Is daughter of Maulsey Kimble (nee Mahardy), a Chickasaw by blood, and sister of Wyatte Mahardy. Chickasaw by blood: roll No. 2974. Maulsey Kimble died prior to preparation of 1893 roll. Sallie Williams is full sister of Angeline Porter and half sister, by same mother, of Amanda Abram, both of whom have been finally enrolled as Chickasaws by blood. The name of Richard Kimble, who is father of Angeline Porter and Sallie Williams, and stepfather of Amanda Abram, is found on Capt. Henderson Greenwood’s annuity roll of December 18, 1878, as the head of a family of five, opposite No. 200, from which it appears that he drew $9.50 for himself, his wife, and three female children. Unquestionably, the three female children were the three daughters above named. Sallie Williams was born and has always lived in the Chickasaw Nation. There is no doubt about, her being of Chickasaw blood, and that her ancestors were recognized citizens is equally true. Her name can not be found upon the 1893 or 1896 rolls, but this Is a case where equity should step in and give justice to this woman and her children. It is contended, however, that the department had jurisdiction heretofore to enroll these applicants upon this 1878 enrollment by the tribe. All the above facts will appear from the record In the case.
Number of claimants in this memorandum, 7.

Williams, Sophie (age 70).
Choctaw by blood or Mississippi Choctaw. Files: Statement of claimant given at office of district agent, Hugo, Okla., November 11, 1908. See Part I, Exhibit F, report March 3, 1909. Although this woman claims to be a full-blood Choctaw, her name does not appear upon the approved rolls. Her statement was taken through an interpreter, Mr. Sam Jones, who is himself a Choctaw by blood. No one could doubt her Choctaw blood after seeing her and hearing her statement interpreted. She claims that she is the daughter of John Lewis and wife, both full-blood Choctaws: that she removed to the Indian Territory from Louisiana about Christmas time of 1901, and that she has resided in said nation ever since. This woman would not be entitled to enrollment under the Curtis Act, because she did not remove to the Choctaw Nation prior to June 28, 1898. She would be entitled to enrollment, however, as a Mississippi Choctaw under section 41 of the Cboctaw-Chickasaw supplemental agreements inasmuch as she is a full-blood Choctaw. Her residence in the Choctaw Nation would also entitle her to the benefits of a Mississippi Choctaw. Failure to make application seems to be the only bar to her claim.
Number of claimants in this memorandum, 1.

Winbock (given name unknown).
Choctaw by blood. Files: Memorandum made at office of district Indian agent. Antlers, Okla., November 13, 1908. Part I. Exhibit F. report March 3, 1909. Mr. Robert E. Lee. of Leflore, Okla., who Is a merchant and educated Choctaw, reported the case of a child 2 or 3 years of age who had failed to secure enrollment. He stated that the father of the child is Wattle Winbock, a full-blood Indian, who resides near Leflore, and that the mother is a white woman, Mr. Lee does not know why the child was not enrolled.
Number of claimants In this memorandum, 1.

Wilson, Agnes (.Minor.)
Hodges, Mary (Minor)
Choctaws by blood. Memorandum of statement by Chas. Knapp district Indian Agent. Hugo, Okla., made November 12 1908 (See Pt I Ex. K report Mar. 3, 1900) There children, whose ages are 12 and 14 years respectively, were reported by Mr. Knapp as living 5 miles north of Garvin. He states that he found them in a destitute condition, almost without clothing. They are the children of Mrs. Sarah Wilson and Hannibal Hodges, both full-blood Choctaws. After these children were born the father left the locality and was never seen there any more. It is supposed that he served a term In Fort Leavenworth Penitentiary.

Mr. Sam Jones, who acted as policeman and Indian interpreter and who is a Choctaw by blood, also saw these children. When they visited the children they found them engaged in grinding corn by pounding it on rocks. Their clothing consisted of nothing but rags, through which their naked bodies could be seen. It is said that their mother has an allotment. This may be true, as the name Sallie Wilson appears upon the final approved rolls opposite No. 5832 as that of a full-blood Choctaw woman, age 43. The right of the mother, however, should be ascertained by careful investigation inasmuch as she may not be identical with the person whose name appears opposite No. 5832. Number of claimants in this memorandum, 2.

Wilson, Harriett. (Including all other children of Harriett Wilson by the same father.)
Flack (nee Wilson). Anna.
Jones (nee Wilson). Martha.
Choctaws by blood. Files: Record in case on file in Indian Office. (See also statement of Harriett Wilson, made Nov. 10, 1908, at office of district Indian agent, Atoka, Okla., recorded in Pt. I. Exhibit F, report Mar. 3, 1909.) Harriett Wilson and her two daughters named above are enrolled as Choctaw freedmen, but they claim to be entitled to enrollment an citizens by blood of the Choctaw Nation. Harriett Wilson claims to be entitled to enrollment us a quarter-blood Choctaw, it being alleged that her father was Edmond Colbert and that he was half-blood Indian. It appears, however, that her mother was a slave. In view of the fact last slated it would seem that Harriett Wilson must also have been a slave, as she was born prior to the emancipation of the Choctaw-Chickasaw slaves. The cases of the other two applicants named are much stronger than that of their mother. It is claimed that they are the daughters of John Wilson, a full-blood Choctaw and as they were born subsequent to the emancipation of their mother they would be entitled to enrollment as citizens by blood if the statements of Harriett Wilson are accurate. The application of Harriett Wilson for transfer to the blood rolls was denied because not made within the time prescribed by law. In connection herewith, see memorandum relating to Katie Wilson et al.
Number of claimants named in this memorandum, 3.

Wilson, Katie. (Including also the other children of Katie Wilson.)
Wilson, Blanche. (Minor.)
Brown, Pernelia.
Choctaws by blood. Files: Record on file in Indian Office. (See also statement of Katie Wilson, made Nov. 27, 1908, at office of district Indian agent, McAlester, Okla.. recorded In Pt. III. Ex. F, report Mar. 3, 1909).) The persons are enrolled as Choctaw freedmen, but their cases are not dependent upon the same facts. The mother claims to be entitled to enrollment as a one-fourth blood Choctaw, alleging that her father was Edmond Colbert, a half-blood Indian. She states however, that her mother was a slave. It is a very close question whether Katie was born before or after the emancipation of the Choctaw slaves. If before, she was a slave, and her enrollment as a freedman was proper. Her application for transfer to the blood rolls was dismissed because made too late. The case of Blanche Wilson is much stronger than that of her mother, the child being the daughter of an alleged full-blood Indian. Blanche looks more like an Indian than a colored person. The Indian blood is strongly predominant. Contrast this case with that of her niece, Allie Brown, who is the child of Blanche’s sister and a grandchild of Katie Wilson. Said child is the daughter of an Indian by blood, and her name also appears upon the blood rolls. In this connection it should he noted that the little girl is of mixed Negro and Indian blood. The case of her aunt, Blanche, appears to be fully as meritorious as her own. It also appears that the ease of Pernelia Brown, mother of Allie, is precisely analogous to that of Blanche Wilson.
Number of claimants named in this memorandum, 3.

White (Christian name not known).
Choctaw by blood. Files: Memorandum of data obtained at Hugo, November 12, 1908, Part I, Exhibit F, report March 3, 1909. Mr. Peter Hudson and Mr. Charles Knapp. special Choctaw delegate and United States district Indian agent, respectively, state that there is a man named White residing near Stanley, Okla., who is enrolled as a Choctaw freedman, but claims to be an Indian by blood. He refuses to accept a freedman allotment.
Number of claimants in this memorandum, 1.

Woffard, Jack.
Cherokee by blood. Files: See records of Commissioner to the Five Civilized Tribes, this information having been obtained from Mr. John Rosson, who is employed therein. This claimant is one-fourth blood Cherokee. Post office, Tahlequah, Okla. He is a son of Than Woffard, a half-blood Cherokee, whose name appears on the final approved Cherokee roll opposite No. 18502. Jack Woffard shows his Indian blood and speaks the Cherokee language fluently. He has acted as Cherokee interpreter for the Dawes Commission.
Number of claimants, 1.

Wolfe, Che-ko-na-la. (Minor.)
Cherokee by blood. Files: Cherokee N. B. 3872. records of Commissioner to the Five Civilized Tribes. Application was made for the enrollment of this child under the act of April 20, 1906. It is a full-blood Cherokee of parents who belong to the Knight Hawk Band, who opposed enrollment and refused to give any information in regard to the children or to apply for their enrollment. As the time for closing the rolls drew near the application of this child had to be rejected for lack of information.
Number of claimants in this memorandum, 1.

Wolfe, Jim. Talala, Okla.
Cherokee by blood. Files: Report of November 15, 1907, from Commissioner to the Five Civilized Tribes. Case No. 10991. This applicant, who is a full-blood Indian, made application for enrollment November 20, 1900, as a citizen by blood of the Cherokee Nation, his age being given at that time as 41 years, June 20, 1901, the Commissioner to the Five Civilized Tribes refused his application for enrollment In accordance with the provisions of the act of May 31, 1900 (31 Stat, 221), and on September 24, 1901, said decision was approved by the department. On November 27, 1903 (I. T. D., S3O4-1903), on request of the commission, the department rescinded its decision and returned the case for readjudication. Further proceedings were had in the case September 21, 1904, and October 30, 1905. On February 21, 1907, the commissioner rendered his decision ordering Jim Wolfe enrolled as a citizen of the Cherokee Nation of Shawnee blood. The attorney for the Cherokee Nation entered no protest against the enrollment of Jim Wolfe, but through inadvertence his mime was not placed upon a schedule of Cherokee citizens and forwarded to the department for approval.
Number of claimants in this memorandum, 1.

Wood, Jim.
Choctaw by blood. Files: Memorandum made at office of district Indian agent. Antlers, Okla., November 13, 1908. Part I, Exhibit F, report March 3, 1909. Mr. Peter Hudson states that, according to his best recollection. Wood is one-fourth blood Choctaw and three-fourths blood Negro; that he never was a slave; and that he resided with the Choctaw people in Mississippi. Mr. Hudson also states that there appears to be some question as to whether he was a slave, but that he has resided with the Choctaw people a great many years both in Mississippi and in the Choctaw Nation. He has not received an allotment there as a freedman or Choctaw by blood. He claims to be an Indian and either has refused or is very reluctant to accept any benefits as a freedman. It is also stated that there is a record in this case with the Dawes Commission; that this man has been recognized by the tribal government as a citizen of the Choctaw Nation; that he has exercised the duties of a citizen; and that he speaks only the Choctaw language. His post office is Noah, Okla.
Number of claimants In this memorandum, 1.
Note.—Possibly a duplication of Anohwatubbe, James N.

Worcester, Mamie. (Minor.)
Chickasaw by blood. Files: Memorandum of information obtained at Atoka, Okla., November 10, 1908. (See Part I, Exhibit F. report March 3, 1909.) The memorandum is as follows: “Mr. Mills, district agent at Atoka, in conversation with Mr. T. W. Kennedy, superintendent of the national school at Frisco, Okla. (old Stonewall), states today that there is a girl, aged about 10 years, named Mamie Worcester, who failed to secure enrollment. Her father. L. D. Worcester, and mother, Mattie L. Worcester, are both on the roll as full-blood Chickasaw Indians. See census card. No. 100. Their roll numbers are 294 and 296. It appears that the father lives at or near Waupanuckee and the mother near Bromide, Okla. They have separated and the father claims the guardianship. The child is with the mother and has a brother named Simeon Worcester, whose name appears on the same roll and census card. All are enrolled as full-blood Chickasaws. Clearly no African blood in this case.”
Number of claimants in this memorandum, 1.

Young, Fannie.
Cherokee by blood. Files: Report Acting Commissioner to the Five Civilized Tribes. January 13, 1910, addressed to Hon. J. George Wright. Fannie Young, child of Clara E. Chambers, a Cherokee freedman. No application of record.
Number of claimants in this memorandum, 1.



MLA Source Citation:

United States Congress. Five Civilized Tribes In Oklahoma, Reports of the Department of the Interior and Evidentiary Papers in support of S. 7625, a Bill for the Relief of Certain Members of the Five Civilized Tribes in Oklahoma, Sixty-second Congress, Third Session. Department of the Interior, United States. 1913. AccessGenealogy.com. Web. 20 November 2014. http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/surname-wagoner-to-young.htm - Last updated on Oct 15th, 2012


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