H Canadian Indian Villages, Towns and Settlements

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A complete listing of all the Indian villages, towns and settlements as listed in Handbook of Americans North of Mexico.

Hachaath. An extinct Nootka tribe which formerly lived on or N. of Barclay id, Vancouver id.

Haena. A former Haida town on the E. end of Maude id., Skidegate inlet, Queen Charlotte ids. , Brit. Col. It is said to have been occupied in very early times by the Djahui-skwahladagai, and in recent years it was reoccupied by the west coast Haida, who desired to be nearer the traders, but after a comparatively short occupancy the people moved to Skidegate about 1880. There are said to have been 13 houses, which would indicate a population of about 150. (J. R. S.)

Hagi (Xā′gî, said to mean striped ). A Haida town on or near the largest of the Bolkus ids., Queen Charlotte ids., Brit. Col. It derived its name from a reef which, in local mythology, w r as the first land to appear above the waters of the flood, bearing the ancestress of all the Raven people upon it. The town was occupied by a Ninstints division of the same name. Swanton, Cont. Haida, 277, 1905.

Hagi-lanas (Xā′gi-lā′nas, ‘people of striped (?) town’.). A subdivision of the Haida, belonging to the Raven clan and occupying the town of Hagi, on Hagi id., Queen Charlotte ids., Brit. Col. From the circumstance attending their supposed origin (see Hagi) the family claimed to be the oldest on the islands, but it is now represented by only two or three individuals. There were two subdivisions, the Huldanggats and the Keda-lanas. Swanton, Cont. Haida, 268, 1905.

Hagonchenda. A former Iroquois town, probably belonging to the people of Tequenondahi, and situated in 1535 not far from the junction of Jacques Cartier r. with the St Lawrence. The chief of this town gave a small girl to Cartier on his second voyage, and placed Cartier on his guard against the machinations of the chiefs of the peoples dwelling around Stadacona and elsewhere on the St Lawrence. For this reason Cartier, in his third voyage, in 1540, gave this chief 2 small boys to learn the language, and also a “cloak of Paris red, which “cloak was set with yealow and white buttons of Tinne, and small belles.” See Cartier, Bref Récit, 67, 1863. (J. N. B. H.)

Hagwilget (Tsimshian: well dressed ). The chief village of the Hwotsotenne, on Bulkley r., 3 m. S. E. of Hazelton, Brit. Col. ; pop. 500 in 1870, 161 in 1904.

Hahuamis. A Kwakiutl tribe living on Wakeman sd., Brit. Col.; pop. 63 in 1901, the last time they were officially reported. They are divided into three gentes: Gyeksem, Gyigyilkam, and Haaialikyauae. Boas in Rep. Nat. Mus., 331, 1895.

Haim. A body of Salish of Kamloops agency, Brit. Col., numbering 26 in 1885.

Hakouchirmiou (probably misprint for Hakouchiriniou). Mentioned by Dobbs (Hudson Bay, 23, 1744), as a tribe, on or near Bourbon (Nelson) r., Brit. Am., at war with the Maskegon. Possibly a division of the Cree or of the Assiniboin.

Halant. A Shuswap village 3 m. below Shuswap lake, Brit. Col.; pop. 152 in 1904.

Hamilton Creek. The local name for a body of Salish of Kamloops-Okanagan agency, Brit. Col.; pop. 38 in 1901 (Can. Ind. Aff. for 1901, pt. n, 166), after which date the name does not occur.

Hanehewedl (XanExEwê′, stone by or near the trail). A village of the Nicola band of the Ntlakyapamuk, near Nicola r., 27 m. above Spences Bridge, Brit. Col. Teit in Mem. Am. Mus. Nat. Hist., n, 174, 1900.

Harrison River. The local name for a body of Cowichan near lower Fraser r., Brit. Col. (Can. Ind. Aff. for 1878, 78); evidently the Scowlitz, or the Chehalis, or both.

Hartwell. An Algonquian settlement, containing 25 persons in 1884, in Ottawa co., Quebec. Can. Ind. Aff, 1884.

Hastings Saw Mill. A local name for a body of Squawmish of Fraser River agency, Brit. Col.; pop. 91 in 1898, the last time the name is mentioned.

Hata. A Tsawatenok village at the head of Bond sd., Brit. Col.

Hatch Point. A local name for a body of Salish of Cowichan agency, Vancouver id.; pop. 4 in 1896, the last time reported.

Hellelt. A Salish tribe on Chimenes r., s. w. Vancouver id., speaking the Cowichan dialect; pop. 28 in 1904.

Helshen (‘sandy beach'; lit, ‘soft to the foot’). A Squawmish village community on Burrard inlet, Brit. Col.

Heshque. The principal village of the Hesquiat (q. v.), on Hesquiat harbor, Vancouver id. Can. Ind. Aff., 264, 1902.

Hesquiat. A Nootka tribe on Hesquiat harbor and the coast to the westward, Vancouver id.; pop. 162 in 1901, 150 in 1904. Their principal village is Heshque.

Heudao (Xe-uda′o, ‘the village that fishes toward the south’). A Haida town of the Kaidju-kegawai on the E. side of Gull pt., Prevost id., Queen Charlotte ids., Brit. Col. Swanton, Cont. Haida, 277, 1905.

Hiluys. An unidentified tribe, said to have lived on Laredo channel, Brit. Col., about lat. 52 30 (Scott in Ind. Aff. Rep., 316, 1868). This is in the country of the Kittizoo.

Hlagi (Łāa′gi). A town of the Kaidju-kegawai family of the Haida, on an is land near the E. end of Houston Stewwart channel, Queen Charlotte ids., Brit. Col. Swanton, Cont. Haida, 277, 1905.

Hlakeguns (Łaqē′ gAns). A town of the Kuna-lanas on Yagun r., at the head of Masset inlet, Queen Charlotte ids., Brit. Col. Swanton, Cont. Haida, 281, 1905.

Hlgadun (ŁgadA′n, ‘suffering from over work’). A town of the Skidai-lanas on Moresby id., opposite and facing Anthony id., Queen Charlotte group, Brit. Col. It is prominent in Haida mythology. Swanton, Cont. Haida, 277, 1905.

Hlgaedlin (Łgā′-iLn, probably ‘where they wash the frames upon which salal berries are dried’) . A Haida town occupied by a branch of the Kona-kegawai called Sus-haidagai; situated on the s. side of Tanoo id, s. E. Queen Charlotte ids., Brit. Col. Swanton, Cont. Haida, 278, 1905.

Hlgahet (Łgā′xet, pebble town .) A former Haida town near Skidegate, Queen Charlotte ids., Brit. Col. It was purchased from its earlier owners, the Kogangas, by a branch of the Yaku-lanas who were afterward known as the Hlgahetgu-lanas, from the name of their town. (J. R. S.)

Hlgai (Łgā′i}. Said to have been the name of a tow r n at the head of Skedans bay, w. coast of the Queen Charlotte ids., Brit. Col. Swanton, Cont. Haida, 279, 1905.

Hlgaiha (Łgā′-ixa, from lgai ‘to dig’, xa ‘to put in’). A semi-legendary Haida town N. of Dead Tree pt., at the entrance of Skidegate inlet, Queen Charlotte ids, Brit. Col. From this place the great Gitins family of Skidegate is said to have sprung. Swanton, Cont. Haida, 99, 1905.

Hlgaiu (Łgā′-u′ probably ‘place of stones’). A town and camping place of the Djahui-skwahladagai of the Haida, s. of Dead Tree pt., at the entrance to Skidegate inlet, Queen Charlotte ids, Brit. Col.  One of the names of the town of Skidegate is said to have been derived from this. (J. R. S.)

Hlgaiu-lanas (Łgai-u lá′nas, Skidegate town people ) . A division of the Raven clan of the Haida who originally owned the town of Skidegate, Brit. Col., and hence came to be called by the Haida name of the town. Later they gave the town to the Gitins in payment for an in jury inflicted on one of the latter, and moved to Gaodjaos, farther up the inlet. A subdivision was called Hlgagilda-kegawai. (J. R. S.)

Hlgan (ŁgAn, ‘killer-whale’s dorsal fin’). A Haida town s. of Tigun, on the w. coast of Graham id., Queen Charlotte group, Brit. Col., occupied by the Dostlan-lnagai. The Koetas are said to have lived at this place before they moved to Alaska, and the town is said to have been so named on account of a rock which stands up in front of it like the dorsal fin of a killer-whale. (J. R. S.)

Hlgihla-ala (Łgī′łA ála, probably ‘town of the ditches’). A former Haida town N. of Cape Ball, E. shore of Graham id, Queen Charlotte group, Brit. Col. It was occupied by the Naikun-kegawai. Swanton, Cont. Haida, 280, 1905.

Hlielung (Łi′elAñ). A former Haida town of the Kuna-lanas family on the right bank of a river of the same name (Hi-ellen on Dawson’s chart), which flows into Dixon entrance at the foot of Tow hill, N. coast of Queen Charlotte ids., Brit. Col. The town was erroneously thought by Dawson (Queen Charlotte Ids., 165B, 1880) to be the Ne-coon of John Work. (J. R. S.)

Hlielungkun-lnagai (Łi′elAñ kun lnagā’-i, ‘Łi′elAñ river point town-people’). A town of the Kuna-lanas, belonging to the Raven clan of the Haida, situated on a river of the same name (called Hiellen on Dawson s map). (J. R. S.)

Hlkia (Łk!iä′, ‘chicken-hawk town or saw-bill town’) A former Haida town on the outer side of Lyell id., Queen Charlotte ids. , Brit. Col. It was occupied by the Kona-kegawai. Swanton, Cont. Haida, 278, 1905.

Hluln (Łεuln). A former Haida town in Naden harbor, Graham id., Queen Charlotte group, Brit. Col. Swanton, Cont. Haida, 281, 1905.

Hochelaga (dialectic form of Hochelayi, ‘at the place of the [beaver] dam’). A former Iroquoian town, strongly palisaded, situated in 1535 on Montreal id., Canada, about a mile from the mountain first called “Mont Royal” by Cartier. At that time it contained about 50 typical Iroquoian lodges, each 50 or more paces in length and 12 or 15 in breadth, built of wood and covered with very broad strips of bark, neatly and deftly joined. Estimating 12 fires and 24 firesides, each of three persons, to every lodge, the total population would have been about 3,600. The upper portion of the lodges was used for storing corn, beans, and dried fruits. The inhabitants pounded corn in wooden mortars with pestles and made a paste of the meal, which was molded into cakes that were cooked on large hot rocks and covered with hot pebbles. They also made many soups of corn, beans, and peas, of which they had a sufficiency. In the lodges were large vessels in which smoked fish was stored for winter use. They were not travelers like those of “Canada” and ” Saguenay”, although, according to Cartier, the said Canadians are subject to them with 8 or 9 other peoples along the river.” (J.N. B.H)

Hochelayi (at the place of the [beaver] dam). A former Iroquoian town, situated in 1535 in a flat country not far from the junction of Jacques Cartier r. with the St Lawrence, and probably near the present Pt Platon, Quebec. (J. N.  B. H.)

Hohopa (Ho-ho-pa}. A Koeksotenok village on the w. coast of Baker id., Brit. Col. Dawson in Trans. Roy. Soc. Can., sec. 2, 73, 1887.

Homalko. A Salish tribe on the E. side of Bute inlet, Brit. Col., speaking the Comox dialect; pop. 89 in 1904.

Homulchison. A Squawmish village community at Capilano cr., Burrard inlet, Brit. Col.; the former headquarters of the supreme chief of the tribe. Pop. 45 in 1904.

Hotao (Xō′tao). A legendary Haida town that is said to have stood on the s. w. coast of Maude id, Queen Charlotte group, Brit. Col. From this place, according to one account, came the ancestress of the Hlgaiu-lanas. Swanton, Cont. Haida, 279, 1905.

Hotdjihoas (Xō′tdjixoa′s, ‘hair seals at low tide’). A former Haida tow r n on Lyell id., near the N. end of Darwin sd., Queen Charlotte ids., Brit. Col. It was occupied by the Hagi-lanas. Swanton, Cont. Haida, 277, 1905.

Hoyagundla (Xō′ya, ‘raven creek’). A Haida town on a stream of the same name which flows into Hecate str. a short distance s. of C. Fife, Queen Charlotte ids., Brit. Col. It was occupied by the Djahui-gitinai. Swanton, Cont. Haida, 280, 1905.

Huados. A small Haida town, inhabited by a family bearing the same name, near the town of Hlgihla-ala, N. of C. Ball, Queen Charlotte ids., Brit. Col. Swanton, Cont. Haida, 280, 1905.

Huhilp (Huh-ilp, on the edge). A village of the Fountain band of Upper Lillooet, on Fountain cr., an E. affluent of upper Fraser r., Brit. Col. Dawson in Trans. Roy. Soc. Can. for 1891, sec. ii, 44.

Humelsom (HumElsom). A Squawmish village community on Burrard inlet, Brit. Col. Hill-Tout in Rep. Brit. A. A. S., 475, 1900.

Husam. A former winter village of the Hahamatses at the mouth of Salmon r., Brit. Col.; now the seat of a salmon fishery.

Huthutkawedl (X·ú′tx·ûtkawé, holes by or near the trail). A village of the Nicola band of the Ntlakyapamuk, near Nicola r., 23 m. above Spences Bridge, Brit. Col.

Hwades (Xudē′s, cut beach). The principal village of the Koskimo and Kogrino at Quatsino narrows, Vancouver id.

Hwahwatl (Qwā′qwatl)- A Salish tribe on Englishman r., Vancouver id., speaking the Puntlatsh dialect. Boas, MS. B. A. E., 1887.

Hwotat. A Hwotsotenne village on the E. side of Babine lake, near its outlet, in British Columbia.

Hwotsotenne (people of Spider river). A Takulli tribe, belonging to the Babine branch, living on Bulkley r. and hunting as far as François lake, Brit. Col. They are somewhat mixed with their immediate neighbors, the Kitksan (Morice in Trans. Can. Inst., 27, 1893). Their villages are Hagwilget, Hwotat, Keyerhwotket, Lachalsap, Tsechah, and Tselkazkwo.



MLA Source Citation:

Hodge, Frederick Webb, Compiler. The Handbook of American Indians North of Mexico. Bureau of American Ethnology, Government Printing Office. 1906. AccessGenealogy.com. Web. 15 December 2014. http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/h-canadian-indian-villages-towns-and-settlements.htm - Last updated on Oct 14th, 2013


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