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G- California Indian Villages, Towns and Settlements

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A complete listing of all the Indian villages, towns and settlements as listed in Handbook of Americans North of Mexico.

Gabacamanini. A rancheria, probably Cochimi, connected with Purisima (Cadegomo) mission, Lower California, in the 18th century. Doc. Hist. Mex., 4th s., v, 190, 1857.

Gallinomero. A name more usually rendered Kainomero by the Indians to whom it is applied. It was given by the Spaniards of San Rafael mission to the Pomo from the vicinity of Healdsburg and Santa Rosa, Sonoma co., Cal., on the occasion of their being brought into the mission in the early part of the 19th century. The name is now used to designate in particular the few remaining Indians whose former homes were in the Russian r. valley from the vicinity of Healdsburg S. to the southern limit of the territory occupied by the Pomo, or a point about half way between Santa Rosa and Petaluma. In a still broader sense it is made to include the remainder of the people speaking the same dialect and formerly living about Cloverdale and the upper part of Dry cr. The name is not of Indian origin and its significance is not known.

Gamacaamanc (ravine of palms). A rancheria, probably Cochimi, connected with Purísima (Cadegomo) mission, Lower California, in the 18th century. Doc. Hist. Mex., 4th s., v, 189, 1857.

Gamacaamancxa (mouth of the ravine of palms). A rancheria, probably Cochimi, connected with Purísima (Cadegomo) mission, Lower California, in the 18th century. Doc. Hist. Mex., 4th s. v, 190, 1857.

Gamchines. A former village, presumably Costanoan, connected with Dolores mission, San Francisco, Cal. Taylor in Cal. Farmer, Oct. 18, 1861.

Garomisopona. A Chumashan village between Goleta and Pt Conception, Cal., in 1542. Cabrillo, Narr.(1542) in Smith Colec. Doc. Fla., 188, 1857.

Geguep. A former Chumashan village near Santa Inez mission, Santa Barbara co. Cal. Taylor in Cal. Farmer, Oct. 18, 1861.

Geliac. A former Chumashan village on Patera ranch, near Santa Barbara, Cal. Geliac. Taylor in Cal. Farmer, Apr. 24, 1862.

Genau. A former village, presumably Costanoan, connected with Dolores mission, San Francisco, Cal. Taylor in Cal. Farmer, Oct. 18, 1861.

Gidanemuk (or Gikidanum). A band of Serranos (q. v.) living on Tejon and neighboring creeks in the Tehachapi mts., s. Cal. The term is that which they apply to themselves. (A. L. K.)

Giguay. A former village, presumably Costanoan, connected with San Juan Bautista mission, Cal. Engelhardt, Franciscans in Cal., 398, 1897.

Gilimis. A former village, said to have been Esselen, connected with San Carlos mission, Cal. Taylor in Cal. Farmer, Apr. 20, 1860.

Gimiels. A band of almost pure Yuma in N. Lower California (Taylor in Browne, Res. Pac. Slope, app., 53-54, 1869). Perhaps the Comeya.

Gua. A Chumashan village w. of Pueblo de las Canoas (San Buenaventura), Ventura co. , Cal. , in 1542. In the Munoz manuscript of Cabrillo’s narration (Smith, Colec. Doc. Fla., 181, 1857) this name is united, probably correctly, with the prefix Quanmu, forming Quanmugua.

Guaislac. A former Chumashan village near Santa Inez mission, Santa Barbara co., Cal. Taylor in Cal. Farmer, Oct. 18, 1861.

Gualala. A name applied by Powers to the Pomo living along Gualala r., in Sonoma co., Cal. The people living along this stream belong to two dialectic groups, one occupying the territory chiefly along the lower course of Russian r., the other that along the immediate coastline w. of Gualala r.; but as Powers statements are not explicit, it is not possible to say whether the people speaking one or the other of these dialects is meant. The name itself comes undoubtedly from waláli, a name applied to the point at which the waters of any two streams flow together, or at which any stream flows into the ocean. (S. A. B.)

Gualta. Given by the Yavapai to Fray Francisco Garcés in 1776 as the name of a tribe, possibly in the vicinity of the Rio Colorado. Garcés, Diary (1775-76), 405, 1900.

Guamua. The Yavapai name of a tribe evidently on or in the vicinity of the Rio Colorado in Arizona or California, in the 18th century. Garcés (1775-76), Diary, 404, 1900. Cf. Gueymura.

Guanabepe. The Yavapai name of a tribe, evidently Yuman, on the lower Colorado in Arizona or California, in the 18th century.

Guanlen. A former village, presumably Costanoan, connected with Dolores mission, San Francisco, Cal. Taylor in Cal. Farmer, Oct. 18, 1861.

Guaslaique. A former Chumashan village near Purisima mission, Santa Barbara co., Cal. Taylor in Cal. Farmer, Oct. 18, 1861.

Guayusta. A village of the Rumsen division of the Costanoan family, formerly at Pt Pinos, near Monterey, Cal., the inhabitants of which were connected with San Carlos mission.

Gueymura. A tribe speaking the Dieguefio dialect, formerly living about Santa Catalina mission, N. Lower California. (Duflot de Mofras, Voy, i, 217, 228, 1844). Cf. Comeya, Guamua, Quilmur.

Guilitoy. A tribe of the Patwin division of the Copehan family, formerly living in Napa co., Cal.; one of the seven which made peace with Gov. Vallejo in 1836.

Guima. A former Chumashan village near Santa Barbara, Cal. Taylor in Cal. Farmer, Apr. 24, 1863.

Guloismistac. A former village, presumably Costanoan, connected with Dolores mission, San Francisco, Cal. Taylor in Cal. Farmer, Oct. 18, 1861.

Gupa. A former Agua Caliente village on the headwaters of San Luis Rev r., s. Cal., better known as Agua Caliente (q.v. ) Its inhabitants were removed to Pala res. in 1902.

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