A- Arizona Indian Villages, Towns and Settlements

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A complete listing of all the Indian villages, towns and settlements as listed in Handbook of Americans North of Mexico.

Acachin. A Papago rancheria in s. Arizona; pop. 47 in 1865. Ind. Aff. Rep., 135, 1865.

Achougoula (probably pipe people, from Choctaw ashunga, ‘pipe’). One of the 9 villages constituting the Natchez confederacy in 1699. Iberville in Margry, Dec., IV, 179, 1880.

Agua Escondida (Span.: hidden water ). Apparently a Pima or Papago rancheria s. w. of Tubac, s. Arizona, in 1774. Bancroft, Ariz, and N. Mex., 389, 1889.

Agua Fria (Span.: cold water 1 ). A village, probably Piman, on Gila River res., s. Arizona; pop. 527 in 1863. Bailey makes the pop. 770 in 1858, and Browne gives, it as 533 in 1869.

Agua Salada (Span.: salt water ). A Navaho division in 1799, mentioned as a village by Cortez (Pac. R. R. Rep., III, pt. 3, 119, 1856 ). As the Navaho are not villagers, the Thodhokongzhi (Saline water, or Bitter water) clan was probably intended.

Aicatum. A Maricopa rancheria on the Rio Gila, Ariz., in 1744,. Sedelmair(1774) quoted by Bancroft, Ariz, and N. Mex., 366, 1889.

Akuchiny. A former Pima village s. w. of Maricopa station, s. Arizona. Russell, Pima MS., B. A. E., 16, 1902. Cf.

Alamos. A former rancheria, probably of the Sobaipuri, on Rio Santa Cruz, s. Ariz.; visited and so named by Father Kino about 1697. Bernal (1697) quoted by Bancroft, Ariz, and N. Mex., 356, 1889.

Alcalde  A Papago village, probably in Pima co., s. Ariz.; pop. 250 in I860. Poston in Ind. Aff. Rep. 1863, 385, 1864.

Amoque. A former Maricopa rancheria on Gila r., s. Ariz. Sedelmair (1744) quoted by Bancroft, Ariz, and N. Mex., 866, 1889.

Ana. A village of 70 Papago in 1865, probably in Pima co., s. Ariz. Ind. Aff. Rep., 135, 1865.

Anicam. A Papago rancheria, probably in Pima co., s. Ariz.; pop. 96 in 1858. Bailey in Ind. Aft Rep., 208, 1858.

Animas (Span, ‘souls’). An Apache settlement, apparently near Gila r., Ariz., in 1769. Anza in Doc. Hist. Mex., 4th s., II, 114, 1856.

Aquimundurech. A former Maricopa rancheria on the Rio Gila, s. w. Ariz. Sedelmair (1744) quoted by Bancroft, Ariz, and N. Mex., 366, 1889.

Aquimuri (probably from Pima akimurl, ‘river’). A rancheria of one of the Piman tribes, probably Papago, visited by Father Kino about 1700; situated in Sonora, on the headwaters of the Rio Altar, just s. of the Arizona boundary. It was later a visita of the mission of Guevavi. Consult Rudo Ensayo (1763), 150, 1863; Kino, map (1701) in Bancroft, Ariz, and N. Mex., 360, 1889.

Aquitun (Akuchiny, creek mouth Russell). A former Pima rancheria 5 m. w. of Picacho, on the border of the sink of Rio Santa Cruz, s. Ariz., visited by Father Garcés in 1775. It was abandoned about the beginning of the 19th century. A few Mexican families have occupied its vicinity for many years. The present Pima claim that it was a village of their forefathers.

Aranca. The name of two Pima villages in s. Ariz., one with 208 inhabitants in 1858, the other with 991. Bailey in Ind. Aff. Rep., 208, 1858.

Aribaiba. A former rancheria of the Sobaipuri, on the Rio San Pedro, not far from its junction with the Gila, in s. Arizona. It was visited by Father Kino about 1697. See Ariraipa.

Aridian. A term applied to the early occupants of the desert region of the S. W., particularly of s. Arizona, whose culture, as exemplified by their art and other remains, was similar to that of the Zuñi. Gushing in Proc. Int. Cong. Am., vii, 157, 1890. See Pueblos.

Aritutoc. A former Maricopa rancheria on the N. side of Rio Gila at or near the present Oatman flat and the great bend of the river, in s. Arizona. It was visited by Father Sedelmair in 1744, and by Anza, Font, and Garcés in 1775.

Arivaca. A former Piman village w. of Tubac, s. Ariz., dating from prior to 1733. It was abandoned during the Pima revolt of 1751, before which time it was a visita of the mission of Guevavi. (Bancroft, Ariz. and N. Mex., 385-6, 1889.)

Ati. A former Papago rancheria, visited by Kino about 1697-99, and the seat of a mission established about that date; situated on the w. bank of Rio Altar, between Uquitoa and Tubutama, just s. of the Arizona boundary. Pop. 56 in 1730. The mission was evidently abandoned within the following 40 years, as Garcés (Diary, 1775-76, 455, 1900) speaks of Ati as a favorable site for one. Not to be confounded with San Francisco Ati.

Awatobi (high place of the bow, referring to the Bow people). A former pueblo of the Hopi on a mesa about 9 m. s. E. of Walpi, N. E. Ariz. It was one of the original villages of the province of Tusayan of the early Spaniards, being visited by Tobar and Cardenas of Coronado s expedition in 1540, by Espejo in 1583, and by Onate in 1598. It became the seat of the Franciscan mission of San Bernardino in 1629, under Father Porras, who was poisoned by the Hopi in 1633; but the endeavor to Christianize the Hopi at this and other pueblos was continued until 1680, when, in the Pueblo rebellion, which began in August, the Awatobi missionary, Father Figueroa, was murdered. At this time the Awatobi people numbered 800. Henceforward no Spanish priests were established among the Hopi, although in 1700 Father Garay coechea visited Awatobi, where he baptized 73 natives, but was unsuccessful in his attempt to reestablish missions among them. In November of the same year, owing to the friendly feeling which the Awatobi are said to have had for the Spanish friars, their kindred, especially of Walpi and Mashongnovi, joined in an attack on Awatobi at night, setting fire to the pueblo, killing many of its inhabitants, including all the men, and carrying off women and children to the other pueblos, chiefly to Mashongnovi, Walpi, and Oraibi. Awatobi was never again inhabited. The walls of the old Spanish church are still partly standing. See Mindeleff in 8th Rep. B. A. E. , 1891; Fewkes in Am. Anthrop., Oct., 1893; Fewkes in 17th Rep. B. A. E., 592 et seq., 1898. (F. W. H.)

Aycate. A former Maricopa rancheria on the Rio Gila, s. w. Ariz. Sedelmair (1744) quoted by Bancroft, Ariz, and N. Mex., 366, 1889.




MLA Source Citation:

Hodge, Frederick Webb, Compiler. The Handbook of American Indians North of Mexico. Bureau of American Ethnology, Government Printing Office. 1906. AccessGenealogy.com. Web. 24 April 2014. http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/a-arizona-indian-villages-towns-and-settlements.htm - Last updated on Oct 14th, 2013


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