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Biography of Frank C. Ramsey

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Frank C. Ramsey

Frank C. Ramsey

The history of a state, as well as that of a nation, is chiefly a chronicle of the lives and deeds of those who have conferred honor and dignity upon society. The world judges of the character of a community by those of its representative citizens, and yields its tribute of admiration and respect for the genius or learning or accomplishment of those whose works and actions constitute the record of a state’s prosperity and pride. In a review of the events that constitute the annals of Idaho we learn that Frank C. Ramsey is numbered among those who have been active in shaping the policy of the state, in promoting its interests and advancing its welfare. In public office he has acquitted himself as a loyal and patriotic citizen, having the best interests of the state at heart, and today he is a recognized leader in political circles.

A resident of Boise, where he engaged in the loan and insurance business, he was born in Fulton County, Pennsylvania, in 1855, and is of Scotch and German ancestry. The founders of the family in America were early settlers in the south, and the maternal ancestry furnished several representatives to the colonial army in the war of the Revolution. His father, James Ramsey, was born and reared in the south, and in early life removed to Pennsylvania, where he was married to Miss Susan Snyder, a native of Pennsylvania. They had seven children, all of whom are living. The father departed this life in 1859, but the mother lived to the age of eighty years and passed away on the 6th of March 1898. They were members of the Methodist church and Mr. Ramsey was an honest and industrious farmer who won the respect of all with whom he came in contact.

In the public schools of his native state Frank C. Ramsey acquired his early education, which was supplemented by a course in the Iron City Business College. Owing to ill health he sought a change of climate, going first to Ohio and thence to Idaho, where he spent some years engaged in farming. He later removed to Kansas and afterward to Colorado, where he engaged in the stock business until 1884, the year of his arrival in Idaho. Here he continued in stock raising for some time. In Cassia county he turned his attention to journalistic work, becoming the publisher of the Cassia County Times, now the Albion Times. He also published the Pocatello Tribune, both Republican papers, and through the columns of those journals exerted considerable influence in public affairs.

While in Cassia county, Mr. Ramsey served as county assessor and was elected a member of the legislature in 1890, taking a prominent part in the great senatorial contest of that year. In 1892 he was nominated and elected on the Republican ticket state auditor of Idaho, and so acceptably discharged the duties of that responsible position that he was re-elected in 1894. His official record was indeed creditable and he was again nominated in 1896, this time for state treasurer; but in that year there was great dissatisfaction among the Republicans of Idaho on account of the money question and he was defeated by the candidate of the People’s Democratic party. He is a member of the Republican state central committee and president of the Republican League of Ada County. After completing his term as auditor he was engaged in the insurance and loan business for about two years, or until he was appointed by President McKinley United States marshal for Idaho, receiving his commission September 10, 1898.

On the 2d of February, 1888, Mr. Ramsey married Miss Rachel Worthington, a native of Salt Lake City, Utah, and they have three children, Marion L. Lilian G. and Frances C. Mr. Ramsey is a member of the Masonic fraternity and of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. He is very popular among his brethren of these societies, in political circles and in business and social life; for his uniform courtesy, his character, worth and his genial manner have brought him the friendship and regard of a large circle of acquaintances.

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