Alabama Revolutionary War Soldiers – S Surnames

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SAMPELS, JESSE, aged 79, resided in Jackson County, June 1, 1840.-Census of Pensioners, 1841, p. 148.

SAMPLE, JOHN, SR., aged 75, and a resident of Marengo County; private S. C. Militia; enrolled on July 25, 1834, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $30.88. Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.

SAUNDERS, JOSEPH, aged 77, and a resident of Lawrence County; lieutenant of navy, Virginia State Navy; en-rolled on February 14, 1833, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $365.20.-Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.

SAWYER, STEPHEN, aged 75, and a resident of Greene County; private N. C. Militia; enrolled on March 21, 1834, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $40.-Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34. .

SAXON, JAMES, a resident of Autauga County; private, particular service not shown; enrolled on February 16, 1820, under act of Congress of March 18, 1818, payment to date from September 4, 1834; annual allowance, $96; died January 17, 1836.-Pension Book, State Branch Bank, Mobile.

SCARBROUGH, ELIAS, aged 94, resided in Clarke County, June 1, 1840.-Census of Pensioners, 1841, p. 149.

SEALE, JARVIS, a resident of Greene County; private, particular service not shown; enrolled on July 8, 1835, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $20.-Pension Book, State Branch Bank, Mobile.

SEVIER, GOVERNOR JOHN. “This hero of the Revolution, whose life was a romance, was not one of the pioneer settlers of Alabama. He died in this State and his remains lay buried here for seventy-three years ‘without a stone to mark the place of their repose or an enclosure to protect them from unhallowed intrusion.’ In 1888 his body was removed by the State of Tennessee and laid to rest beneath the sod of the State he had loved and served so faithfully. He is now buried in Knoxville, and the State has erected a stately monument as a memorial of her everlasting though tardy gratitude to her honored son.

“Valentine Xavier, the father of John Sevier, was a descendant from an ancient Huguenot family in Navarre; he was born in London and emigrated to America about 1740; settled on the Shenandoah, Virginia; removed to Watauga, N. C., and finally settled on the Nola Chucka, at Plum Grove. -See Pioneer Women of the West.

“John Sevier was born in Rockingham Co., Va., 23rd of September, 1745, and was educated at the academy in Fredericksburg-. He was married at the early age of seventeen to Sarah Hawkins; soon afterwards he founded Newmarket, in the valley of the Shenandoah; he became at once celebrated as an Indian fighter, and was made captain of the Virginia line in 1772. That spring (1772) he removed to Watauga, now Tennessee, served in Lord Dunmore’s war and was in the battle of Point Pleasant, 1774. ‘His work began at the dawn of the Revolution and lasted to the end.’ It is said he was in thirty battles. His wife’s health was delicate and she never removed from Virginia, but died in 1779, leaving him ten children. In 1780, he married Catharine Sherrill, daughter of Samuel Sherrill of North Carolina, who was one of the pioneers in the valley of the Watauga. She was beautiful, tall, strong and courageous as became the wife of John Sevier. She always boasted that the first work she’ did after she was married was to spin and weave and make the suits of clothes which her husband and his three sons wore in the memorable battle of King’s Mountain. She became the mother of eight children, three sons and five daughters. After the battle of King’s Mountain, John Sevier received a vote of thanks and a present of a sword and pistol from the North Carolina legislature. A fellow soldier said of his appearance during the battle: ‘His eyes were flames of fire, and his words were electric bolts crashing down the ranks of the enemy.’

“He was elected governor of the State of Franklin in 1784; but, as this State was not long allowed existence, Sevier was captured and imprisoned because of alleged disloyalty. However, he was rescued and soon made his escape. That section of country was then given the name by the United States government of ‘Territory south of the river Ohio,’ and he was made brigadier-general of this section in 1789. He was the first delegate sent to represent the Territory in Congress in 1790. During all this time he was incessantly and successfully engaged in defending the settlements from the Indians until their spirit was broken and peace was fully established. No man was ever more feared or respected by them, and as for the white people of the settlements, they loved him as a father, friend and protector. When the State of Tennessee was established, he was elected the first governor in 1796, and served three terms. In 1815, in spite of his age and infirmities, he was appointed by President Monroe to act as United States commissioner to settle the boundary line between Georgia and the Creek territory in Alabama. He died while engaged in this work, September 24th, 1815. He was attended during his illness by only a few soldiers and Indians. He was buried near Fort Decatur, Alabama, on the east side of the Tallapoosa River, at an Indian village called Tuckabatchee, with the honors of war by the troops under command of Capt. Walker, United States army. He was in the active service of his country from a boy of eighteen until he died at the age of seventy. -Mrs. P. H. Mell in Transactions of the Alabama Historical Society, vol. iv, pp. 565-566.

SHEPHERD, R. S., aged 73, resided in Jefferson County, June 1, 1840, with Sarah Nabers.-Census of Pensioners, 1841, p. 149.

SHUMAKER, HARMON, aged 73, and a resident of Fayette County; private Maryland Militia; enrolled on July 12, 1834, under. act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $40.-Revolltionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514 ,23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.

SIBLEY, JOHN, sergeant, particular service not shown; annual allowance, $120; records do not show that any payments were ever made.-Pension Book, State Branch Bank, Mobile.

SIMPSON, ELISHA, aged 76, and a resident of Washington County; private N. C. Militia; enrolled on September 24, 1833, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $36.66.-Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.

SIMPSON, JAMES, aged 79, resided in Randolph County, June 1, 1840, with William Simpson.-Census of Pensioners, 1841, p. 148.

SKANES, ADAM, aged 85, resided in Butler County, June 1, 1840, with Adam Skanes, sen.-Census of Pensioners, 1811, p. 149.

SLOAN, SAMUEL, aged 76, and a resident of Limestone County; private N. C. Continental Line; enrolled on February 29, 1832, under act of Congress of March 18, 1818, payment to date from February 24, 1832; annual allowance, $96; sums received to date of publication of list, $146.48.-Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.

SMITH, ISAAC. “The Rev. Isaac Smith, a native of Virginia, for three years an orderly sergeant in the army under Washington and Lafayette, the friend and host of Bishop Asbury, and other of the Bishops of the Church, for more than half a century a minister of the Gospel, serving the longest term at Asbury Mission of. any man ever connected with it, and terminating his active ministry at that place, was a man of noble character, a model Christian, and he made an honorable record. ‘Believing every word of God, meek above the reach of provocation, and thoroughly imbued with the spirit of love and devotion, he was a saint indeed.’

“An incident may be related here which will relate his patriotism, and which will indicate his fidelity to the ministry and his constant adherence to his religion. In August, 1824, Marquis De La Fayette, the friend of Washington and of American liberty, made a visit to the United States, landing at New York, and he was tendered a reception worthy of his patriotic services and worthy of the country whose liberty he had helped to achieve. The Senate and House of Representatives of the State of Alabama in General Assembly convened, at Cahawba, Alabama, passed, by unanimous vote, a resolution, which was approved December 24, 1824, as follows: ‘And be it further resolved, That his excellency the Governor be re-quested to invite, in such manner as he shall deem most respectful, Major General La Fayette to honor the State of Alabama with a visit, and in the event of his acceptance of such invitation, he be received in such manner as shall best comport with the important services he has rendered the-American people.’ In pursuance of the resolution, Governor Pickens invited the distinguished guest of the nation to Alabama, and the invitation was accepted, and the visit was made. On March 31, 1825, the venerable and honored La Fayette under an escort of Georgians, halted, in the midst of the Creek National, upon the eastern bank of the Chattahoochee River, whose western side laves the soil of Alabama. The Georgia escort delivered the hero of American liberty, and their guest, to fifty nude and painted Creek Indian warriors. The Indians, vying with the citizens of the United States in the homage paid the noble Frenchman, conveyed him across the river and put him down on-Alabama soil. He was then about one mile from the Asbury school. One of the first white men to greet La Fayette when he set foot on Alabama soil was the man who for three years attended him as orderly sergeant, and carried messages for him while the struggle for the independence of the American colonies went on. That man was the Rev. Isaac Smith, the Missionary in charge of the Asbury School for the Indians. They greeted, recollected, and recognized each other. There in the howling wilderness, and in the presence of painted warriors and naked savages, the old comrades in arms embraced each other, and gave expression to their friendship, and vent to their emotions, and the once young orderly, now a grave preacher of the Gospel and a de-voted Missionary, prayed with and for the old Commander and patriot, and with deep emotion, strong faith, and earnest petitions commended him to the court of Heaven, and be-sought for him citizenship in the Kingdom of Christ, and the liberty which pertains to the sons of God. How anomalous and yet how appropriate all this! No event in all the course of that triumphal tour through the American continent made a deeper or more lasting impression upon the old patriot than that reunion of himself and the orderly sergeant of the former times, on the borders of Alabama. La Fayette tarried for the day, and he and Smith, the Missionary to the Indians, talked of the past and the present, in sweet counsel, and in the mean time witnessed one of those special contests and social past-times peculiar to the aborigines, a game of ball. The meeting of his old Commander at the very spot of his missionary labors was one of the unexpected pleasures, which the Rev. Mr. Smith enjoyed beyond description. That meeting recollected the reminiscences of the past, revived his spirits, renewed his youth, strengthened his patriotism, and made an epoch in his eventful life.

“The Rev. Isaac Smith died in Monroe County, Georgia, at the age of seventy-six, and went to his eternal home. His children have honored him by religious lives.”-Rev. Dr. An-son West’s, History of Methodism in. Alabama, pp. 380-2.

SMITH, JAMES, aged 81, resided in Jackson County, June 1, 1840, with James P. Smith.-Census of Pensioners, 1841, p. 148.

SMITH, JOHN, aged 69, and a resident of Madison County; private N. C. Militia; enrolled on September 26, 1833, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $80.-Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34. He resided in Jackson County, June 1, 1840, with Larkin Smith, aged 77.-Census of Pensioners, 1841, p. 148.

SMITH, JOHN, aged 73. and a resident of Bibb County; private S. C. Militia and Continental Line; enrolled on May 29, 1833, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $80; sums received to date of publication of list, $240.-Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Part 3, Vol. xiii, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.

SMITH., REBECCA, AGED 39, resided in Jackson County, June 1, 1840. Census of Pensioners, 1841, p. 148.

SPLANN, CORNELIUS, age not given, a resident of Morgan County; sergeant 8th Regular U. S. Infantry; enrolled on October 15, 1818, payment to date from July 23, 1818; annual allowance, $48; sums received to date of publication of list, 557.69; Acts Military establishment.-Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 2nd Cong., 1st sess.; 1833-34.

STAFFORD, DAVID, aged 74, and a resident of Morgan County; private Virginia Continental Line; enrolled on May 16, 1826, under act of Congress of March 18, 1818, payment to date from April 22, 1826; annual allowance, $96; sums received to date of publication of list, $707.46.-Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.

STANFORD, THOMAS, age not given; resided in Marion county, June 1, 1840.-Census of Pensioners, 1841, p. 148.

STARNES, NICHOLAS, aged 78, and a resident of Jefferson County; private Virginia Militia; enrolled on July 18, 1834, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $20.-Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen .Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.

STEPHEN S, REUBEN, aged 77, resided in Chambers County, June 1, 1840.-Census of Pensioners, 1841, p. 149.

STEWART, THOMAS, aged 76, and a resident of Autauga County; private N. C. State Troops; enrolled on August 1.2, 1833, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $51.45; sums received to date of publication of list, $154.35.-Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Part 3, Vol. xiii, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.

STONE, REUBEN, aged 79, and a resident of Madison County; private S. C. Continental Line; enrolled on January 4, 1834, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $80.-Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.

STILLWAGON, . “Mrs. Elizabeth Stillwagon was accidentally burnt to death at Connellsville on the 6th. She was 115 years old, and her husband was a Revolutionary soldier.”-The Southern Advocate. Huntsville, Feb. 22, 1854.

STOCKMON. CHRISTOPHER, a resident of Mobile County; private, particular service not shown; enrolled on May 20, 1834, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $20; transferred from North Carolina. Pension Book, State Branch Bank, Mobile.

STOKES, SYLVESTER, aged 35, and a resident of Lawrence County; private Virginia Continental Line; enrolled on March 11, 1827, under act of Congress of March 18, 1818, payment to date from February 2, 1827; annual allowance, $96; sums received to date of publication of list, $536.51.-Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.

STORY, HENRY, aged 77, and a resident of Greene County; sergeant S. C. Militia; enrolled on July 2, 1833, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832; payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $120; sums received to date of publication of list, $360.–Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.

STRANGE, ABNER A., aged 73, and a resident of Limestone County; private and sergeant Virginia Continental Militia; enrolled on February 23, 1833, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832; payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, 40; sums received to date of publication of list, $100.-Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.

STRONG, JOHNSON, aged 75, and a resident of Fayette County; private Virginia Militia; enrolled on January 9, 1834, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $33; sums received to date of publication of list, $99.-Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34. He resided in Fayette County, June 1, 1840, aged 82.-Census of Pensioners, 1841, p. 148.

STROUEL, MATHEW, aged 87, and a resident of Shelby County; private N. C. State Troops; enrolled on June 17, 1834, under act of Congress of Tune 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $20.-Rveloutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34. Also resided in Bibb County. Pension Book, State Branch Bank, Mobile.

STUDROE, READY, enrolled under act of Congress of March 18, 1818; no further details given. Pension Book, State Branch Bank, Mobile.

STURDEVANT, JOHN. “At his residence, in Summerfield, Dallas County, of apoplexy, on Saturday morning, the 21st December, 1856, ROBERT STURDEVANT, ESQ., one of the oldest citizens of this county.

“Mr. Sturdevant was born in Dinwiddie County, Virginia, on the 28th July, 1789, and was the son of Mr. John Sturdevant, a soldier of the Revolution. Mr. S. was brought to Hancock, Georgia, when quite young. by his father, and remained there until 1818, when he removed to Alabama.

“We knew Mr. Sturdivant, by report and personally, for the greater portion of our life, and when we came to Selma to reside, in 1845, he gave us the warmest and heartiest welcome. He was kind, liberal and hospitable-a sincere Christian-a charitable man-a good friend of ours, and it is with profound sorrow we record his death.”-The Dallas Gazete, Jan. 9, 1857.

SUTTON, GEORGE, age not given, a resident of Mobile County; private 7th Reg. U. S. Infantry; enrolled on April 18, 1825, payment to date from January 28, 1825; annual allowance, $96; sums received to date of publication of list, $826.10; Acts Military establishment.-Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.

SUTTON, ROBERT, aged 76, and a resident of Lawrence County; private S. C. Continental Line; enrolled on January 24 ,1824, under act of Congress of March 18, 1818, payment to date from November 10, 1823; annual allowance, $96; sums received to date of publication of list, $950.66.-Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.




MLA Source Citation:

AccessGenealogy.com. Revolutionary Soldiers in Alabama. AccessGenealogy.com. Web. 17 April 2014. http://www.accessgenealogy.com/alabama/alabama-revolutionary-war-soldiers-s-surnames.htm - Last updated on Apr 21st, 2013


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