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Biography of Alexander K. Stoddard

The subject of this review is a self-made man who, without any extraordinary family or pecuniary advantages at the commencement of life, has battled earnestly and energetically, and by indomitable courage and integrity has achieved both character and fortune. By sheer force of will and untiring effort he has worked his way upward and is numbered among the leading business men of Nampa, Idaho. A native of Utah, he was born in Wellsville, November 3, 1860, and is of Scotch ancestry. His father, John Stoddard, was born in Scotland and during his boyhood emigrated to the United States, in company with his father and the other members of the family, a location being made in Utah. During his business career he followed farming and engaged in the sawmill business. He married Miss Emily Kershaw, a native of England, who departed this life in the twenty-eighth year of her age, leaving four children, all yet living. The father passed away when fifty-five years of age. Alexander Stoddard, their second son, was educated in Utah, and when eleven years of age began to learn the trade of manufacturing lumber in his father’s sawmill, since which time he has continued in that line of business. He is now a part owner of a sawmill at Baker City, Oregon, and in 1886 he located at Nampa, where he opened a yard for the sale of his lumber. Not long afterward he purchased a hardware store, and in 189S erected a large brick store in the center of the business district, in which he con-ducts his hardware trade. He has won a good patronage,...

Biography of Charles R. Kelsey

Among the more recent accessions to the town of Mountain Home is Charles R. Kelsey, a gentleman of large business experience, who, as a wholesale dealer in groceries and hardware and general merchandise, has already proved himself a potent factor in the business circles of his adopted county. Mr. Kelsey is a native of New York State, born in Delaware County, at Cannonsville. November 2, 1837, and in his veins flows the blood of French and German ancestors, who were among the early settlers of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. His father, Michael B. Kelsey, was born in that city and counted among his relatives the distinguished family of Buchanans which furnished to the nation one of its presidents. Michael B. Kelsey was a prominent and successful farmer and stock dealer. He married Miss Phebe Galusha, who was also a representative of a distinguished eastern family. Both he and his wife were members of the Methodist church, and in county affairs he was active and influential, holding a number of official positions, including those of county commissioner and county sheriff. His wife died at the age of forty-five years and his death occurred when he had reached the advanced age of seventy-four. Their three children are all living at this writing. Charles R. Kelsey acquired his education in Poughkeepsie, New York. At an early age he was taught to depend upon his own resources and when only a small lad entered upon his business career, as a newsboy, employing other boys to work for him and furnishing their outfits. Thus early he became self-reliant and also manifested a strong commercial instinct, which...

Biography of Frederick Crete, Sr.

One of the most successful pioneer citizens of Silver City is Frederick Crete, who is a native of Hanover, Germany, where he was born in August 1833. He is a brother of John Crete, Sr., whose sketch will be found elsewhere in this volume. While still a young man Mr. Crete decided to try his fortunes in the New World, of which he had heard so much, and bidding adieu to the Fatherland and all its happy associations, he embarked on a vessel which landed him in New York city in 1852. From there he found his way to Attleboro, Massachusetts, where for some time he worked at the jewelry business. In 1858 Mr. Crete became a victim of the California fever and took a trip to the land of gold by way of the Isthmus of Panama, sailing on the steamer John L. Stephens. He remained in California until 1865, during that time studying and practicing dentistry, and then removed to Silver City, where he carried on his profession for some years. He also had a store at a place called Fairview, on Eagle Mountain. This town was burned out in 1875 and Mr. Crete lost all his property. Soon after this the great excitement caused by the discovery of gold in the Black Hills swept over the land, and our subject started with hundreds of others to test the truth of the reports. He traveled as far as Cheyenne, Wyoming, but on reaching there received some intelligence from Silver City which caused him to return, and soon afterward he started the Silver City brewery, which he has...

Biography of George H. North

Among the worthy citizens that New York has furnished to the state of Idaho is George H. North, the well known clothing merchant of Pocatello, whose enterprising, progressive methods give character to the business life of the city, and whose reputation in commercial circles is unassailable. He was born in Springwater, Livingston County, of the Empire state, July 14, 1858, a son of C. S. and Elvira Thankful (Wetmore) North, who likewise were natives of the same county. The father successfully carried on farming there until his death, which occurred in the fifty-eighth year of his age, while his wife, who still survives, is now sixty-five years of age. They were the parents of five children, but only two are living at this writing, in the summer of 1899. George H. North, having obtained his preliminary education in the common school, supplemented it by a course in the Geneseo Western Seminary, in Syracuse, New York, where he was graduated with the class of 1876. He then worked on his father’s farm for a time, after which he started westward and accepted a clerkship with his uncle, Orland North, in Evanston Spring, Wyoming. He spent two years in that place and then began business on his own account in Shoshone, Idaho. Subsequently he came to Pocatello and, as a member of the firm of North & Church, established his present business in 1890. That partnership was continued until January 1, 1895, after which Mr. North carried on operations alone until October 1, 1898, when he sold a half interest in the store to Richard Douglass and the present firm of...

Biography of Edward Fanning

The career of this prominent Idaho merchant illustrates the claim, frequently made, that a man of enterprise will inevitably get into and make a success of the business for which he has the most liking and aptitude, regardless of discouragements and obstacles which would direct weaker men permanently into other paths of endeavor. Edward Fanning was born in county Carlow, Ireland, February 23, 1844, a son of Patrick and Bridget (Murphy) Fanning. His father was a farmer, and both his parents were born in the Catholic faith and were reared and lived and died in it, Patrick Fanning passing away in his eighty-fourth year, and Bridget Fanning in her eighty-second year. They had eight children, of whom only three survive. Edward was educated in his native country and entered mercantile life at the age of twenty, as a salesman in a store. Three years later he came to the United States and located in Omaha, where he was given a position in the storeroom of the railroad company. In 1869 he removed to Evanston, Wyoming, and was roadmaster there and at Pocatello and Idaho Falls until 1895. He then gave up the railroad position to become a member of the Clark & Fanning Company, merchants, in which Nathan H. Clark was his partner. The concern was burned out after about two years’ successful business, but the company had sufficient insurance on its plant and stock and sufficient capital to enable it to continue business without embarrassment. A mercantile enterprise which had been established by Messrs. Johnson & Poulson was purchased by the Clark & Fanning Company. Mr. Clark withdrew...

Treaty of September 17, 1851

Articles of a treaty made and concluded at Fort Laramie, in the Indian Territory, between D. D. Mitchell, superintendent of Indian affairs, and Thomas Fitzpatrick, Indian agent, commissioners specially appointed and authorized by the President of the United States, of the first part, and the chiefs, headmen, and braves of the following Indian nations, residing south of the Missouri River, east of the Rocky Mountains, and north of the lines of Texas and New Mexico, viz, the Sioux or Dahcotahs, Cheyennes, Arrapahoes, Crows, Assinaboines, Gros-Ventre Mandans, and Arrickaras, parties of the second part, on the seventeenth day of September, A. D. one thousand eight hundred and fifty-one. Article I. The aforesaid nations, parties to this treaty. having assembled for the purpose of establishing and confirming peaceful relations amongst themselves, do hereby covenant and agree to abstain in future from all hostilities whatever against each other, to maintain good faith and friendship in all their mutual intercourse, and to make an effective and lasting peace. Article II. The aforesaid nations do hereby recognize the right of the United States Government to establish roads, military and other posts, within their respective territories. Article III. In consideration of the rights and privileges acknowledged in the preceding article, the United States bind themselves to protect the aforesaid Indian nations against the commission of all depredations by the people of the said United States, after the ratification of this treaty. Article IV. The aforesaid Indian nations do hereby agree and bind themselves to make restitution or satisfaction for any wrongs committed, after the ratification of this treaty, by any band or individual of their...

Biography of William Lenley Goheen

William Lenley Goheen is publisher of the Holyrood Banner and also the Galatia Register, two papers of extensive circulation and large influence in Ellsworth and Barton counties. Mr. Goheen is a veteran of the printing trade and it is doubtful if any Kansas printer or newspaper man had had a more varied and eventful experience. Much of his life had been spent in the service of that typical American institution, the traveling circus, and as a press agent he had covered nearly every town and city of the United States. Mr. Goheen, who was born at Moweaqua, Illinois, July 25, 1866, comes of an old Pennsylvania family. His grandfather, Stephen Goheen, was born in Pennsylvania of Irish and French stock. He spant his life in Bucks County, where as a potter he was engaged in the manufacture of high grade porcelain ware. He died in Bucks County before his grandson, William L., was born. He also held the rank of major in the United States army. His wife’s name was Beemeth, a Frenchwoman. Charles Besneth Goheen, father of William L., was born in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, in 1822. He learned the trade of cooper, followed it in Bucks County, where he married his first wife, and in young manhood moved to Cincinnati, working at his trade in that city, and finally to Whitehall, Illinois, where he spent the rest of his life and where he died in 1872. His wife was visiting at Moweaqua when their sen William L. was born. Charles B. Goheen enlisted in 1861 in an Illinois regiment, and was on active duty practically from the...

Biography of Henry H. Hoff

The German character has impressed itself upon our American progress by the inculcation of lessons of thrift, industry and respect for the law. It has made itself felt in the development of our public educational system. In the possession of a goodly number of citizens of German parentage Idaho is fortunate. One of its leading representative German-American citizens is Henry Herman Hoff, of Montpelier. Henry Herman Hoff was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, March 16, 1849, a son of John G. and Catharine (Pfitzenmaier) Hoff, who were born in Wurtemberg, Germany, in 1814, were married in the Fatherland, and came to the United States in 1835. Mr. Hoff became a wholesale boot and shoe merchant at Philadelphia, where he died in 1891, aged seventy-seven. Mrs. Hoff died in 1861, aged forty-seven. They had seven sons and two daughters, of whom only four are living. Henry Herman Hoff, the sixth son in order of nativity, attended the public schools of Philadelphia until he was twelve years old, and then took up the battle for bread on his own account. He spent six years in acquiring a knowledge of the butcher’s trade and business, in which he has been employed almost continuously since, latterly as the proprietor of extensive interests in that line. He was at Chicago four years, until after the great fire of 1871, of which he has a vivid recollection: at San Francisco, California, four months and then went to Salt Lake City, where he met two of his brothers, whom he had not seen for thirteen years. After an interval in which he hauled ore for smelters and...

Biography of John W. Minnick

JOHN W. MINNICK. – In the person of the subject of this sketch we have one of the leading men of Union county, both in matters of business and of prominence in development and progress of that which is for the interests of all citizens. Forceful, energetic and wide awake, he has made his influence felt not alone in the enterprises of business where he is universally successful, but also in the conventions and newspapers of the county, being recognized as one of the most vigorous and telling local writers of the county, thus casting an influence that is both potent and salutary. Highland county, Ohio, is his birthplace and September 15, 1849, the date that he first saw the light, being the son of Samuel and Phoebe (Hyatte) Minnick, natives respectively of Reckbridge county, Virginia, and Ohio, and early pioneers of the latter state. In 1857 the family came to Jasper county, Iowa, and there the father died, but the mother is still living at the home place. The opportunities for early education were limited and John W. was obliged to make up for the lack by more careful attention and personal research for himself, which has given him a fund of information both practical and comprehensive. At the age of sixteen he engaged as brakeman on the Rock Island Railroad in Iowa, served for five months and then acted as fireman for one year and nine months and then became engineer for four months, enjoyed a wreck and quit railroading. In 1875 he came to Wyoming and worked at carpenter work on a flume, then operated in...

Biography of Edwin H. Lupton

Edwin H. Lupton. Ever since its arrival in America, some 250 years ago, the Lupton family has been identified with the opening up of new sections of this country. The earliest American progenitor was a pioneer of New England; later members were early settlers of Ohio, Michigan and Iowa, and the present representative of the family, Edwin H. Lupton, has been one of the foremost factors in encouraging settlement and development in certain parts of Kansas, particularly in Sheridan County, where he has large interests. In addition to being an extensive property owner, Mr. Lupton is president of the Bank Savings Life Insurance Company of Topeka, Kansas, is one of the leading real estate dealers of Hoxie and has been the medium through which some large transactions have been consummated. Edwin H. Lupton was born in Muscatine County, Iowa, in 1858, and came to Kansas in 1886 from Nebraska, where he had located in 1880. He is a son of William C. Lupton, a native of Ohio, and a grandson of Gideon Lupton, who was born in Virginia. The family is of Quaker descent, and its members have always conformed to the beliefs of that creed. Gideon Lupton was one of the very early settlers of Ohio, and subsequently became a pioneer of Michigan, where he spent the last years of his life in agricultural pursuits and died. His son, William Carr Lupton, was born in Ohio, and in 1854 located in Muscatine County, Iowa, when that part of the country was still new. Later he bought considerable property in Benton County, in the same state, and moved to...
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