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Treaty of July 29, 1829

Articles of a treaty made and concluded at Prairie du Chien, in the Territory of Michigan, between the United States of America, by their Commissioners, General John McNeil, Colonel Pierre Menard, and Caleb Atwater, Esq. and the United Nations of Chippewa, Ottawa, and Potawatamie Indians, of the waters of the Illinois, Milwaukee, and Manitoouck Rivers. Article 1. The aforesaid nations of Chippewa, Ottawa, and Potawatamie Indians, do hereby cede to the United States aforesaid, all the lands comprehended within the following limits, to wit: Beginning at the Winnebago Village, on Rock river, forty miles from its mouth, and running thence down the Rock river, to a line which runs due west from the most southern bend of Lake Michigan to the Mississippi river, and with that line to the Mississippi river opposite to Rock Island; thence, up that river, to the United States’ reservation at the mouth of the Ouisconsin; thence, with the south and east lines of said reservation, to the Ouisconsin river; thence, southerly, passing the heads of the small streams emptying into the Mississippi, to the Rock River aforesaid, at the Winnebago Village, the place of beginning. And, also, one other tract of land, described as follows, to wit: Beginning on the Western Shore of Lake Michigan, at the northeast corner of the field of Antoine Ouitmette, who lives near Gross Pointe, about twelve miles north of Chicago; thence, running due west, to the Rock River, aforesaid; thence, down the said river, to where a line drawn due west from the most southern bend of Lake Michigan crosses said river; thence, east, along said line, to...

Biography of Stephen Alden Tracy

Stephen Alden Tracy, a well-known resident of Cornish, was born here, October 31, 1833, son of Stephen and Sarah (Alden) Tracy. The family is one of the oldest in this country, and traces its descent to Lieutenant Thomas Tracy, who came from England in 1636 and settled in Connecticut. Lieutenant Tracy was son of Nathaniel and grandson of Richard Tracy, of Stanway, England. Nathaniel’s eldest brother was made a baronet by King James I. on June 29, 1611, being the thirteenth of the order created by James. The Tracy coat of arms, in the possession of the family, shows the scallop shell (indicating that some ancestor was a Crusader) between two narrow red bands, and a crest surmounted by a shell between two wings of gold, with the motto, “Memoria Pii Æterna.” The line of descent from Lieutenant Tracy is through Thomas, Jr., father of Jeremiah Tracy. Andrew, the next in descent, lived in Lisbon, Conn. He married Ruth Smith, daughter of Captain Elijah Smith, of Barnstable, Mass., and had eleven children. His son Andrew, Jr., born March 17, 1750, who died December 28, 1819, was the first to come to Cornish. This Andrew married Annie Bingham, of Windham, Conn., whose children by him were: Lemuel, Ruth, Lucy, Elias, Stephen, Anna, Andrew, and Jesse. Lemuel, born July 29, 1773, who married Phœbe Parker, had moved to Cornish with his father in 1783; and they were the first settlers of the family in this section. The Tracy homestead, which is one of the oldest houses in the town, was built in 1793. It has since been remodelled; but the solid,...

Treaty of September 3, 1839

Articles of a treaty made at Stockbridge in the Territory of Wisconsin, on the third day of September in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and thirty-nine, between the United States of America, by their commissioner Albert Gallup, and the Stockbridge and Munsee tribes of Indians, who reside upon Lake Winnebago in the territory of Wisconsin. Article I. The Stockbridge and Munsee tribes of Indians (formerly of New York) hereby cede and relinquish to the United States, the east half of the tract of forty-six thousand and eighty acres of land, which was laid off for their use, on the east side of Lake Winnebago, in pursuance of the treaty made by George B. Porter commissioner on the part of the United States, and the Menominee nation of Indians, on the twenty-seventh day of October eighteen hundred and thirty-two. The said east half hereby ceded, to contain twenty-three thousand and forty acres of land; to be of equal width at the north and south ends, and to be divided from the west half of said tract of forty-six thousand and eighty acres, by a line to be run parallel to the east line of said tract. The United States to pay therefore, one dollar per acre at the time and in the manner hereinafter provided. Article II. Whereas a portion of said tribes, according to a census or roll taken, and hereunto annexed, are desirous to remove west and the others to remain where they now are; and whereas the just proportion of the emigrating party in the whole tract of forty-six thousand and eighty acres...

Treaty of September 15, 1832

Articles of a treaty made and concluded, at Fort Armstrong, Rock Island, Illinois, between the United States of America, by their Commissioners, Major General Winfield Scott of the United States’ Army, and his Excellency John Reynolds, Governor of the State of Illinois, and the Winnebago nation of Indians, represented in general Council by the undersigned Chiefs, Headmen, and Warriors. Article I.The Winnebago nation hereby cede to the United States, forever, all the lands, to which said nation have title or claim, lying to the south and east of the Wisconsin river, and the Fox river of Green Bay; bounded as follows, viz: beginning at the mouth of the Pee-keetol a-ka river; thence up Rock river to its source; thence, with a line dividing the Winnebago nation from other Indians east of the Winnebago lake, to the Grande Chûte; thence, up Fox river to the Winnebago lake, and with the northwestern shore of said lake, to the inlet of Fox river; thence, up said river to lake Puckaway, and with the eastern shore of the same to its most southeasterly bend; thence with the line of a purchase made of the Winnebago nation, by the treaty at Prairie du Chêne, the first day of August, one thousand eight hundred and twenty-nine, to the place of beginning. Article II.In part consideration of the above cession, it is hereby stipulated and agreed, that the United States grant to the Winnebago nation, to be held as other Indian lands are held, that part of the tract of country on the west side of the Mississippi, known, at present, as the Neutral ground, embraced...

Biographical Sketch of Eric Wold

Eric Wold who has been city engineer of Burlingame for the past four years and at present is also acting in the same capacity for the infant municipality of San Bruno, has been engaged in engineering work the greater part of his life. His college training and wide experience has splendidly fitted him for the important work that he is now doing; while Burlingame’s streets, the water system and other municipal improvements well bespeak Mr. Wold’s ability. Anxious to have their municipality profit from the same competent engineering that Burlingame did, the San Bruno citizens retained Mr. Wold. He is now at work perfecting plans for bridges, street improvements, sidewalks and a water system which when completed will make San Bruno one of the ideal towns of the county. Besides his wide experience as a municipal engineer Mr. Wold has followed his profession in other lines. He was in the service of the government for three years. While engaged in railroad work he made many important locations for the Western Pacific and other lines. Eric Wold was born in Norway on April 5, 1878. While just a child his parents brought him to Quebec and from there they moved to Minnesota where Mr. Wold spent the early part of his life. After graduating from the La Crosse High School at La Crosse, Wisconsin, he entered the University of Minnesota. In 1902 he graduated from the engineering department of this institution. Since then he has been following this profession in different parts of the United States, having been in California for the past ten years. Mr. Wold was married at...

Biography of Dr. Isaac R. Goodspeed

For fifty-six years-more than half a century, Dr. Isaac R. Goodspeed has been one of the foremost citizens of San Mateo County; coming here when a young doctor with the ink on his diploma hardly dry, he remained in the county ever since. During this time he has been identified with many successful business enterprises and has faithfully filled the various offices he has held for both San Mateo City and County. Dr. Goodspeed was born in China. Maine, on May 30, 1831. In 1854 he graduated from Bowdoin Medical College, one of a class of nineteen. Today he is the only living member of that class. He began the practice of medicine at Milwaukee, and in 1854 he was married to Miss Elizabeth P. Woodcock at Gardiner, Maine. A short time after his graduation he went west to Chicago, and in 1858 came to California. He tried mining in Nevada for a while, but with indifferent success; and soon came to San Francisco and opened an office on Kearny street, where he remained until 1860. In the Spring of this year he decided to try his luck down the peninsula. He liked the climate of Pescadero so well that he settled in this town and remained there for the next ten years. For two years he taught school. and practiced medicine. Then he went into the merchandise business and later on tried ranching, all the time keeping up the practice of medicine. His other activities while at Pescadero were, serving as Justice of the Peace, ex-officio Coroner, and Associate County Judge with one of the justices of the...

Biography of Elbridge G. Little

Elbridge G. Little was born August 5, 1807. He obtained his preliminary education at Exeter, N.H., and graduated from the Medical College at Cleveland, Ohio. He attained eminence in his profession, and in New Lisbon, Wis., where his last years were passed, he was one of the wealthiest and most prominent citizens. His wife, who was born November 4, 1809, was a daughter of Thomas and Judith (Dodge) Peabody, of the part of old Danvers, Mass., now known as Peabody. She was a sister of George Peabody, the wealthy and benevolent banker, who died in London, and who bequeathed to her son, George Peabody Little, a portion of his vast wealth. Six children were born to Dr. and Mrs. Little, George P.; Allen F., who was born August 12, 1838; and Henry C., who was born March 31, 1842. George Peabody Little was educated in the academy in Lewiston, N.Y., Pembroke Academy of Pembroke, N.H., and the gymnasium and military institute here, a branch of the Norwich Military Academy of Vermont. He taught school for one term in Pembroke, N.H., when he was eighteen years old, and the following year went to Portland, Me., where he was engaged in mercantile business some six years. The ten years ensuing he managed a photograph studio at Palmyra, N.Y., having taken a fancy to chemicals and cameras. Returning then to Pembroke, N.H., he purchased his present homestead, and turned his attention to general farming and cattle breeding. In 1868 he erected a handsome residence, a spacious barn, and other buildings. Mr. Little has about two hundred and twenty-five acres of land in...

Biographical Sketch of Charles A. Corman

Charles A. Corman was born in Manitowoc county, Wisconsin, March 20, 1849. He is the son of Dennis V. and Louisa Reynolds Corman, natives of New York. He was educated at Manitowoc and grew to manhood in his native State. He began life on his own account as a lumberman, and pursued that business during four years. In January, 1874, he came to Missouri and located at Jamesport, where he entered the dry goods and grocery business, which he continued for five years. He then established his present drug and book store, and has ever since done a thriving trade. His stock is one of the most complete in town and his patrons are treated with fairness and politeness. Mr. Corman was married in his native county, November 16, 1873, to Miss Isabella, daughter of John and Elizabeth Spencer, natives of England. Mrs. Corman was born in the same county as her husband, on the 14th day of August, 1852. The issue of this union has been three children: Charles W., born July 16, 1874; Lulu Mabel, born August 9, 1876; and Lee, born March 16, 1879. Mr. Corman is a member of Jamesport Lodge No, 339; I. O. O....

Biography of Hon. Ira Colby

Hon. Ira Colby, one of the leading lawyers of the State of New Hampshire, was born in Claremont, N.H., January 11, 1831, son of Ira and Polly (Foster) Colby, both of purely English descent. Their families in the various branches number many persons of distinction. On the maternal side he is descended from Reginald Foster, who came from Exeter, Devonshire, England, and settled in Ipswich, Essex County, Mass., in 1638. It has been stated in an account of the descendants of Joseph Stickney, which appeared in the New Hampshire Granite Monthly of July, 1892, that the family of this Reginald is honorably mentioned in “The Lay of the Last Minstrel” and “Marmion.” When Mrs. Colby was eleven years of age, her father removed with his family from Essex, Mass., to Henniker, N.H., to prevent his sons from becoming seafaring men. She there met Mr. Colby, a native of the place. They were married April 17, 1827, and immediately removed to Claremont, where they ever afterward lived. Mr. Colby was one of the most successful and enterprising farmers of his town, and was honored with many positions of trust. He served as a Selectman in the years 1858 and 1859 and as a Representative of the town in the legislature of New Hampshire in 1872 and 1873. He died in 1873, at the age of seventy years. The subject of this sketch lived at his father’s, and worked upon the farm on “Bible Hill,” so called, until seventeen years of age, his only schooling up to that time having been obtained at the district schools. He then entered Marlow Academy,...

Wisconsin World War 2 NMCG Casualty List

Inclusion of names in this Wisconsin World War II Casualty List has been determined solely by the residence of next of kin at the time of notification of the last wartime casualty status. This listing does not necessarily represent the State of birth, legal residence, or official State credit according to service enlistment. Casualties listed represent only those on active duty in the U.S. Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard, resulting directly from enemy action or from operational activities against the enemy in war zones from December 7, 1941, to the end of the war. Casualties in the United States area or as a result of disease, homicide or suicide in any location is not included. This is a state summary taken from casualty lists released by the Navy Department, corrected as to the most recent casualty status and recorded residence of next of kin. Personnel listed as MISSING are under continuous investigation by the Navy Department, and therefore will be officially presumed or determined dead. Some will be found alive. The last official notice to next of kin will take precedence over this list. Compiled, February 1946 Wisconsin Summary of War Casualties Dead: Combat 1325 Prison Camp 24 Missing 0 Wounded 1766 Released Prisoners 58 Total 3173 Wisconsin World War 2 NMCG Casualty List Wisconsin WW2 NMCG Casualty List – A Surnames Wisconsin WW2 NMCG Casualty List – B Surnames Wisconsin WW2 NMCG Casualty List – C Surnames Wisconsin WW2 NMCG Casualty List – D Surnames Wisconsin WW2 NMCG Casualty List – E Surnames Wisconsin WW2 NMCG Casualty List – F Surnames Wisconsin WW2 NMCG Casualty List –...
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