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Treaty of February 27, 1867

Articles of agreement concluded at Washington, D. C., on the twenty-seventh day of February, 1867, between the United States, represented by Lewis G. Bogy, Commissioner of Indian Affairs, W. H. Watson, special commissioner, Thos. Murphy, supt. of Indian affairs for Kansas, and Luther R. Palmer, U. S. Indian agent, duly authorized, and the Pottawatomie tribe of Indians, represented by their chiefs, braves, and head-men, to wit: Mazhee, Mianco, Shawgwe, B. H. Bertrand, J. N. Bourassa, M. B. Beaubien, L. H. Ogee, and G. L. Young Whereas the Pottawatomies believe that it is for the interest of their tribe that a home should be secured for them in the Indian country south of Kansas, while there is yet an opportunity for the selection of a suitable reservation; and whereas the tribe has the means of purchasing such reservation from funds to arise from the sale of lands under the provisions of this treaty, without interfering with the exclusive rights of those of their people who hold their lands in common to the ownership of their diminished reserve, held by them in common, or with their right to receive their just proportion of the moneys arising from the sale of unallotted lands, known as surplus lands: Now, therefore, it is agreed. Article 1.It being the intention of the Government that a commission shall visit the Indian country as soon as practicable after the ratification of the treaties contemplating the removal of certain tribes from Kansas, accompanied by delegates from the several tribes proposing to remove, it is agreed that a delegation of the Pottawatomies may accompany said commission in order to...

Treaty of March 29, 1866

Whereas certain amendments are desired by the Pottawatomie Indians to their treaty concluded at the Pottawatomie agency on the fifteenth day of November, A. D. 1861, and amended by resolution of the Senate of the United States dated April the fifteenth, A. D. 1862; and whereas the United States are willing to assent to such amendments, it is therefore agreed by and between Dennis N. Cooley, commissioner, on the part of the United States, thereunto duly authorized, and the undersigned business committee, acting on behalf of said tribe, and being thereunto duly authorized, in manner and form following, that is to say: Article 1.The beneficial provisions in behalf of the more prudent and intelligent members of said tribe, contained in the third article of the amended treaty above recited, shall not hereafter be confined to males and heads of families, but the same shall be and are hereby extended to all adult persons of said tribe, without distinction of sex, whether such persons are or shall be heads of families or otherwise, in the same manner, to the same extent, and upon the same terms, conditions, and stipulations as are contained in said third article of said treaty with reference to “males and heads of families.” In testimony whereof the said parties by their Commissioner and Business Committee aforesaid have hereunto set their hands and seals at Washington City, District of Columbia, this 29th day of March, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-six. Dennis N. Cooley Commissioner J. N. Bourassa U. F. Navane B. N. Bertrand Business Committee Signed in presence of L....

Treaty of November 15, 1861

Articles of a treaty made and concluded at the agency on the Kansas River, on the fifteenth day of November, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-one, by and between Wm. W. Ross, commissioner on the part of the United States, and the undersigned chiefs, braves, and head-men of the Pottawatomie Nation, on behalf of said nation. Article 1. The Pottawatomie tribe of Indians believing that it will contribute to the civilization of their people to dispose of a portion of their present reservation in Kansas, consisting of five hundred and seventy-six thousand acres, which was acquired by them for the sum of $87,000, by the fourth article of the treaty between the United States and the said Pottawatomies, proclaimed by the President of the United States on the 23d day of July, 1846, and to allot lands in severalty to those of said tribe who have adopted the customs of the whites and desire to have separate tracts assigned to them, and to assign a portion of said reserve to those of the tribe who prefer to hold their lands in common: it is therefore agreed by the parties hereto that the Commissioner of Indian Affairs shall cause the whole of said reservation to be surveyed in the same manner as the public lands are surveyed, the expense whereof shall be paid out of the sales of lands hereinafter provided for, and the quantity of land hereinafter provided to be set apart to those of the tribe who desire to take their lands in severalty, and the quantity hereinafter provided to be set...

Treaty of September 20, 1828

Articles of a treaty made and concluded at the Missionary Establishments upon the St. Joseph, of Lake Michigan, in the Territory of Michigan, this 20th day of September, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and twenty-eight, between Lewis Cass and Pierre Ménard, Commissioners, on the part of the United States, and the Potowatami tribe of Indians. Article 1. The Potowatami tribe of Indians cede to the United States the tract of land included within the following boundaries: Beginning at the mouth of the St. Joseph, of Lake Michigan, and thence running up the said river to a point on the same river, half way between La-vache-qui-pisse and Macousin village: thence in a direct line, to the 19th mile tree, on the northern boundary line of the State Indiana; thence, with the same, west, to Lake Michigan; and thence, with the shore of the said Lake, to the place of beginning. Beginning at a point on the line run in 1817, due east from the southern extreme of Lake Michigan, which point is due south from the head of the most easterly branch of the Kankekee river, and from that point running south ten miles; thence, in a direct line, to the northeast corner of Flatbelly’s reservation; thence, to the northwest corner of the reservation at Seek’s village; thence, with the lines of the said reservation, and of former cessions, to the line between the States of Indiana and Ohio; thence, with the same to the former described line, running due east from the southern extreme of Lake Michigan; and thence, with the said line, to...

Treaty of October 2, 1818 – Potawatomi

Articles of a treaty made and concluded at St. Mary’s, in the state of Ohio, between Jonathan Jennings, Lewis Cass, and Benjamin Parke, commissioners of the United States and the Potawatamie nation of Indians. Article I. The Potawatamie nation of Indians cede to the United States all the country comprehended within the following limits: Beginning at the mouth of the Tippecanoe river, and running up the same to a point twenty-five miles in a direct line from the Wabash river—thence, on a line as nearly parallel to the general course of the Wabash river as practicable, to a point on the Vermilion river, twenty-five miles from the Wabash river; thence, down the Vermilion river to its mouth, and thence, up the Wabash river, to the place of beginning. The Potawatamies also cede to the United States all their claim to the country south of the Wabash river. Article II. The United States agree to purchase any just claim which the Kickapoos may have to any part of the country hereby ceded below Pine creek. Article III. The United States agree to pay to the Potawatamies a perpetual annuity of two thousand five hundred dollars in silver; one half of which shall be paid at Detroit, and the other half at Chicago; and all annuities which, by any former treaty, the United States have engaged to pay to the Potawatamies, shall be hereafter paid in silver. Article IV. The United States agree to grant to the persons named in the annexed schedule, and their heirs, the quantity of land therein stipulated to be granted; but the land so granted shall...

Treaty of December 16, 1834

Articles of a treaty, made and concluded at the Potawattimie mills, in the State of Indiana, on the sixteenth day of December, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and thirty-four, between William Marshall Commissioner on the part of the United States and the Chiefs, headmen, and warriors of the Potawattamis Indians. Articles 1.The chiefs, head men and warriors aforesaid agree to cede to the United States their title and interest to a reservation made to them at the treaty on the Tippecanoe river on the 27th day of October 1832 of two sections of land to include their mills on said river. Article 2.In consideration of the cession aforesaid the United States agree to pay the Potawattimie Indians, at the payment of their annuities in 1835, the sum of seven hundred dollars in cash, and pay their just debts agreeably to a schedule hereunto annexed, amounting to nine hundred dollars. Article 3.The miller provided for by the 3rd article of the treaty with the Potawattimie tribe of Indians on the sixteenth day of October, in the year eighteen hundred and twenty-six, is not to be supported by the United States, and to cease from and after the signing of this treaty. Article 4.This treaty shall be binding upon both parties, from the date of its ratification by the President and Senate of the United States. In testimony whereof, the said William Marshall, commissioner on the part of the United States, and the chiefs, head men, and warriors of the Potawatamie tribe of Indians, have hereunto subscribed their names, the day and year above written. William...

Treaty of December 10, 1834

Articles of a Treaty made and concluded at a camp on Tippecanoe river, in the State of Indiana, between William Marshall, Commissioner on the part of the United States and Muck Rose, a Chief of the Potawattamie tribe of Indians, and his band, on the tenth day of December, in the year eighteen hundred and thirty-four. Article 1.The above named chief and his baud hereby cede to the United States, six sections of land reserved for them by the second article of the treaty between the United States and the Pottawattamie Indians on Tippecanoe river, on the twenty-sixth day of October, in the year, eighteen hundred and thirty-two. Article 2.The above named chief and his band agree to yield peaceable possession of the said sections of land to the United States within three years from the date of the ratification of said treaty of eighteen hundred and thirty-two. Article 3.In consideration of the cession aforesaid the United States stipulate to pay to the above named chief and his band, four hundred dollars in goods at the signing of this treaty, and an annuity of one thousand dollars for two years, the receipt of which former sum of (four hundred dollars in goods) is hereby acknowledged. Article 4.This treaty shall be binding upon both parties from the date of its ratification by the President and Senate of the United States. In testimony whereof, the said William Marshall, commissioner on the part of the United States, and the above named chief and his band, have hereunto subscribed their names the day and year above written. William Marshall Muck Rose, his x...

Treaty of December 4, 1834

Articles of a Treaty, made and concluded at a camp, on Lake Max-ee-nie-kue-kee, in the State of Indiana, between William Marshall, Commissioner on the part of the United States, and Com-o-za, a Chief of the Potawattimie tribe of Indians and his band, on the fourth day of December, in the year eighteen hundred and thirty-four. Article 1.The above named chief and his band hereby cede to the United States, the two sections of land reserved for them by the 2d article of the treaty between the United States and the Pottawattimie Indians on Tippecanoe river on the 26th day of October, in the year eighteen hundred and thirty-two. Article 2.The above named chief and his band agree to yield peaceable possession of said sections within three years from the date of the ratification of said treaty of eighteen hundred and thirty-two. Article 3.In consideration of the cession aforesaid the United States stipulate to pay the above named chief and his band the sum of four hundred dollars in goods at the signing of this treaty, and an annuity of four hundred dollars for one year, the receipt of which former sum of (four hundred dollars in goods) is hereby acknowledged. Article 4.This treaty shall be binding upon both parties, from the date of its ratification by the President and Senate of the United States. In testimony whereof, the said William Marshall, commissioner, on the part of the United States, and the above named chief and head men, for themselves and their band, have hereunto subscribed their names, the day and year above written. William Marshall Com-o-za, his x mark...

Treaty of February 11, 1837

Articles of a treaty concluded in the city of Washington on the eleventh day of February eighteen hundred and thirty-seven between John T. Douglass, commissioner on the part of the United States and Chee-chaw-kose, Ash-kum Wee-saw or Louison, Muck-kose and Qui-qui-to, chiefs of the Potawatomie tribe of Indians. Article 1. The chiefs and head men above named do, for themselves and their respective bands sanction and give their assent to the provisions of the treaties concluded between A. C. Pepper, commissioner on the part of the United States and certain chiefs and young men of the Potawatomie tribe of Indians, on the 5th day of August and 23d day of September 1836, in which were ceded to the United States certain lands in the State of Indiana, in which the chiefs and head men above named have an interest, the same having been reserved for them and their bands respectively in the treaties of October 26th and 27th 1832. And the chiefs and head men above named, for themselves and their bands, do hereby cede to the United States all their interest in said lands, and agree to remove to a country that may be provided for them by the President of the United States, southwest of the Missouri river, within two years from the ratification of this treaty. Article 2. The United States agree that the several sums, for the payment of which provision is made in the treaties of August and September 1836, referred to in the preceding article, shall be paid to the respective chiefs and bands, for whose benefit the lands, ceded by said treaties,...

Treaty of April 11, 1836

Articles of a treaty made and concluded at a camp on Tippecanoe river, in the State of Indiana, between Abel C. Pepper commissioner on the part of the United States, and Pau-koo-shuck, Aub-ba-naub-ba’s oldest son and the head men of Aub-ba-naub-ba’s band of Potawattimie Indians, this eleventh day of April in the year, eighteen hundred and thirty-six. Article 1. The aforesaid Pau-koo-shuck and the head men of Aub-ba-naub-ba’s band, hereby cede to the United States the thirty-six sections of land reserved for them by the second article of the Treaty between the United States and the Potawattimie Indians on Tippecanoe river on the twenty-sixth day of October, in the year eighteen hundred and thirty-two, Article 2. In consideration of the cession aforesaid, the United States stipulate to pay to the aforesaid band the sum of twenty-three thousand and forty dollars in specie, one half at the first payment of annuity, after the ratification of this Treaty, and the other half at the succeeding payment of annuity, Article 3. The above-named Pau-koo-shuck and his band agree to remove to the country west of the Mississippi river, provided for the Potawattimie nation by the United States within two years, Article 4. [Stricken out by Senate.] Article 5. This Treaty, after the same shall be ratified by the President and Senate of the United States shall be binding upon both parties. In testimony whereof, the said Abel C. Pepper, commissioner as aforesaid, and the said Pau-koo-shuck, and his band, have hereunto set their hands, this eleventh day of April, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and thirty-six. Abel...
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