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Analogy between the Nootkan and Columbian or Chinook

Dr. Scouler’s analogy between the Nootkan and “Columbian,” or Chinook, was founded on the following words: English Tlaoquatch and Nutka Columbian plenty *aya *haya no *wik *wake water tchaak chuck good *hooleish *closh bad *peishakeis *peshak man *tchuckoop tillicham woman *tlootsemin *clootchamen child *tanassis *tanass now tlahowieh clahowiah come *tchooqua *sacko slave mischemas *mischemas what are you doing *akoots-ka-*mamook ekta-*mammok what are you saying *au-kaak-*wawa ekta-*wawa let me see *nannanitch *nannanitch sun *opeth ootlach sky *sieya  *saya fruit  *chamas *camas to sell *makok *makok understand *commatax *commatax * But of these, none marked with an asterisk belong to the Chinook or any of its dialects. The greater part of them are undoubtedly Nootkan, though there are errors in the spelling and, in some instances, in the meaning. Of the rest, the Nootkan “tchaak” and the Chinook “tl’tsuk” alone presents an analogy. “Klahowiah” does not mean “now,” nor do I believe it is Nootkan, in any sense. It is, as explained in the dictionary, the Chinook salutation, “How do you,” “Good-bye,” and is supposed to be derived from the word for “poor”, “miserable”. “Mischemas” is not Chinook, and is probably not Nootkan. With the exception of Franchere, whose short vocabulary was published by Mr. Gallatin, and Mr. Hale, all the writers mentioned by Ludwig who have given specimens of the Chinook language, have presented it in its Jargon form, more or less mixed with the neighboring ones, and with corruptions of French and English words. Mr. Swan, among others, has been led into this error. The place of his residence, Shoalwater Bay, is common ground of the Chinook and Chihalis...

Nootka Tribe

Nootka Indians, Nootka People, Nootka First Nations. A name originally applied to the Mooachaht of Nootka sound, west coast of Vancouver Island, and to their principal town, Yuquot, but subsequently extended to all the tribes speaking a similar language. These extend from Cook Creek to the north to beyond Port San Juan, and include the Makah of Flattery Creek, Washington. Sometimes the term has been used as to exclude the last named tribe. The Nootka form one branch of the great Wakashan family and their relationship to the second or Kwakiutl branch is apparent only on close examination. In 1906 there were 435 Makah and 2,159 Vancouver Island Nootka for a total of 2,594. They are decreasing slowly but steadily, the reduction in population of the Nootka of Vancouver Island alone having exceeded 250 between 1901 and 1906. The Nootka tribes are: Ahousaht, Chaicclesaht, Clayoquot, Cooptee, Ehatisaht, Ekoolthaht, Hachaath (extinct), Hesquiat, Kelsemaht, Klahosaht (probably extinct), Kwoneatshatka (?), Kyuquot, Makah, Manosaht, Mooachaht, Muchalat, Nitinat, Nuchatlitz, Oiaht, Opitchesaht, Pachenaht, Seshart, Toquart, Uchucklesit, and Ucluelet.  ...

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