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Biography of Hon. Steven L. Wiles

HON. STEVEN L. WILES. Mr. Wiles is a prominent citizen of Polk Township, and one whose constancy to the business in hand and whose thrift have added so greatly to the value of the agricultural region. He is a native of North Carolina, was born in Surry County in the year 1831, and is the son of Steven and Rachel (Steelman) Wiles, also natives of Surry County, N. C. Our subject’s paternal grandfather, Steven Wiles, was born in England and there reared and married. Prior to the Revolutionary War he came to the United States and located in Surry County, N. C., where the remainder of his days were passed in tilling the soil. He served his adopted country six years in the Revolution and was a brave and faithful soldier. He was the father of seven sons and two daughters, among whom were the following: Pierson, John, Luke, Hiram, Gillam and Steven. The name of the other child is forgotten. Our subject’s maternal grandfather, Charles Steelman, also an Englishman, was reared and married in that country. He came to the United States previous to the Revolution but was not a soldier. He was a farmer and passed the remainder of his life in North Carolina. The parents of our subject grew to mature years in their native county and received limited educations in the common schools. They were married there, and there continued to make their home until early in 1832, when they removed to Lincoln County, Tennessee, when that part of the State was wild and unsettled. There the father farmed until his death in January, 1856,...

Biography of William Proctor, M. D.

WILLIAM PROCTOR, M. D. (deceased), was a physician who always loved knowledge and as a physician was devoted to his profession, careful in his investigations and gave all the time he could find in his busy life to books and periodicals devoted to medicine and surgery. His range of information was broad, and during the many years he pursued the calling of AEsculapius he won a wide reputation and a large practice. He was born in Petersburg, Virginia, in 1826, and died January 10, 1890, when sixty-four years of age. He was a graduate of William and Mary College, of Virginia, and studied law under his father, Thomas Proctor, who subsequently moved to Tennessee, where the Doctor was his stenographer. During the Mexican war the Doctor joined a Tennessee regiment and fought through the war. He was in the battle of Buena Vista and the City of Mexico, and had command of the flags on the rampart. For bravery he was promoted to the rank of captain on the battlefield at Chepultepec, when seventeen years of age. After the war he went to Warren County, Kentucky; where he studied medicine. Later he went to the University of Pennsylvania, at Philadelphia, and subsequently began practicing in Warren County. When the Civil War broke out he was Government contractor for the Federal Government and furnished a post at Bowling Green with horses and feed for them. He was there all through the war and after-ward engaged in farming and stockraising, and also dealt in tobacco. In the year 1874 he moved to Ripley County, Missouri, located at Doniphan, and at once...

Biography of R. D. C. Griffin

R. D. C. GRIFFIN. The name of Griffin is well known throughout Searcy County, for it has been connected with the business interests of this section for a long term of years, and is the synonym of honesty, industry and business integrity. Mr. Griffin was born in Huntsville, Ala., August 31, 1828, a son of Jesse and Sarah W. (Brooks ) Griffin, who removed first from Alabama to Tennessee, and in 1846 to Searcy County, Arkansas, where they entered a tract of land on which the father lived until his death, which occurred in 1886. Throughout the active years of his life, or from early manhood, he was a minister of the Methodist Episcopal Church South, was a member of the old Arkansas Conference and preached at many different points throughout the State. It may with truth be said of him that he was the father of the Methodist Church in this county. Mrs. Griffin was born in the Old North State and died in January, 1891, having become the mother of tlle following children: Minerva (Mrs. Chandler); R. D. C.; J. L., who is living in this county; Lucinda, who is the Widow Hollobaugh; Wade, who was killed in the explosion of a mill, and John W., who is a Methodist preacher of Boone County, Arkansas R. D. C. Griffin was a young man when the family came to this county, and from here he enlisted in the Mexican War, afterward becoming a member of the Confederate Army during the Civil War, Company F. McKay’s brigade. He began life for himself as a farmer of this county and...

Biography of Maj. Charles Galloway

In the veins of the gentleman whose name heads this sketch flows sterling Scotch blood, for his paternal grandfather, James Galloway, was born in the land of ” thistles and oatmeal,” of Scotch parents. He immigrated to this country from the land of his birth in early manhood and later settled in the district known as the old Crab Orchard, Kentucky He was the founder of the family in this country, and eventually passed from life in Knox County, Tennessee He was one of the pioneers of that State, was active in its development, and took part in a number of engagements with the Indians, when his home and that of his neighbors was threatened. Politically he is a Democrat. He reared a family of four sons and five daughters, Jesse Galloway, the father of the subject of this sketch, being one of the former and a native of the “dark and bloody ground.” He was taken to Tennessee when quite small, and after residing there until about sixty years of age he removed to Indiana, and in 1839 became a resident of Barry County, Missouri, of which place he was a resident until his death ten years later. Like his father before him he was a Democrat, and also like him he was active in assisting in the settlement of his section, which at that time was in a very wild state,’ inhabited by plenty of wild game of various kinds. He took part in the Creek, Seminole and Cherokee Indian Wars, and was also a participant in the War of 1812. He was married in Tennessee to...

Biography of William Munks

WILLIAM MUNKS. – Mr. Munks, an excellent portrait of whom is placed in this history, is a veteran of several wars, as well as a pioneer, trapper and scout in the early days of the Pacific coast. He is to-day one of the most widely known men on Puget Sound, being often called “king of the Fidalgo Island” as he was the first white man to locate on its shores. It was then a part of Whatcom County, Washington Territory, but is now included in the boundary of Skagit. Mr. Munk was the first white man that lived within the present confines of the latter county, and was born in Canton, Ohio. At the early age of six years he suffered the loss, by death, of his father. Upon the breaking out of the war with Mexico, he enlisted in the Fifteenth Infantry, United States volunteers, under General (then Colonel) George W. Morgan, with whom he remained until the close of hostilities. The military record of the family is rather bright, his grandfather having served in the war for independence, his father in the war of 1812, and his only brother following the fortunes of Sherman on his march to the sea. In 1849 he left the East to seek his fortune in the far West. After hunting and trapping for a time on the western slope of the Rocky Mountains, he came onto Oregon, and then proceeded to the mines of Northern California, where he followed mining with good success until 1855, during which time he took part in two Indian wars, and had many skirmishes with the...

Biography of Col. La Fayette Mosher

COL. LA FAYETTE MOSHER. – There is perhaps no resident of Oregon more widely known and generally respected than L.F. Mosher. He has held so many prominent positions, and is so well qualified to fill them, that it only seems a natural thing to see him in the senate, and as a justice of the supreme court. He was born in Benton County, Kentucky, September 1, 1824. So entirely did he bend his energies tot he gaining of an education, that at the age of nineteen years we find him a graduate of Woodward College, Cincinnati, where he carried off honors on June 30, 1843. After graduating, he acted as deputy clerk of the supreme court of Hamilton County, where he remained until the breaking out of the Mexican war. He at once came valiantly forward and joined the Fourth Ohio Regiment, and served in the brigade of General Joseph Lane until the close of the war. When the war was ended he entered the law office of Pugh & Pendleton, the members of the firm being ex-Senator George E. Pugh, now deceased, and ex-Senator George H. Pendleton. He was admitted to the bar in May, 1852, and at once began the practice of his profession in Cincinnati. He came to Oregon with General Lane in 1853, landing in Portland in May of that year. The following months he went to the mines in Jackson County, and took part in the Indian war of the same year, acting as adjutant-general under General Lane. He also earnestly engaged in the Indian war of 1855-56, acting as a volunteer, though not...

Biography of Hon. Isaac Ingalls Stevens

HON. ISAAC INGALLS STEVENS. – Governor Stevens was born at Andover, Massachusetts, March 18, 1818. He graduated from West Point in the class of 1839, of which he stood at the head, and immediately thereafter was commissioned second lieutenant of engineers. In 1840 he was promoted to a first lieutenancy. In the war with Mexico (1846-1848) he served on the staff of General Scott and for gallant and meritorious services at Contreras, Churubusco and Chapultepec earned the brevet rank of major. He was severely wounded in the capture of the City of Mexico from the effect of which he suffered during life. At the close of that war, Alexander Dallas Bache, Superintendent of the United States coast survey, appointed him chief clerk in charge of the office at Washington, District of Columbia, a position he resigned in March, 1853, to accept the first governorship of Washington Territory. He journeyed thither across the continent, exploring a route from the headwaters of the Mississippi River to Puget Sound. On the 29th of September,1853, he entered the territory and assumed the performance of his gubernatorial duties therein. He issued his proclamation thereof at the crossing of the dividing ridge on the summit of the Rocky Mountains bearing that date. During the years 1854 and 1855, as superintendent of Indian affairs, he concluded treaties with the native Indian tribes within the territory, by which the so-called Indian title to an area of land including one hundred thousand square miles was extinguished. In the latter year he also served as a member of the joint commission to effect peace and amity between the tribes...

Biography of James Quincy Thomas

James Quincy Thomas of Mahomet is now in his eighty-ninth year. It is a remarkable span of life which his years cover. He was born when Andrew Jackson was President of the United States. Not a permanent settlement had been fixed in Champaign County at the time of his birth. There were no railroads in America, no telegraph lines, very few canals, and none of the labor-saving devices which have transformed industry and social life. As a young man he swung the flail and the scythe in cutting and threshing grain, and not only actively experienced all the hardships of that primitive time, but has lived on until he has witnessed flying machines and other wonders of the electrical twentieth century. Mr. Thomas has lived in Champaign County for more than half a century. He is certainly one of the oldest citizens of the county and is perhaps the only survivor of the Mexican War living in this county. He was born in Bourbon County, Kentucky, November 26, 1828, the only son and only surviving child of William E. and Mary (Thomas) Thomas. He had four sisters. His father was born in Loudoun County, Virginia, and as a boy he saw General George Washington. He grew up in his native state and moved to Kentucky, where he married. He died in Kentucky in 1863. As a young man he voted the Whig ticket and afterwards became a Republican. His wife was a native of Kentucky and died there in 1841. James Quincy Thomas received his education through four terms of attendance at subscription schools. He paid $2.50 for each...

Biography of Isham L. Tiner

This well known citizen and successful fruit-grower of Boise was born in Williamson county, Illinois, July 14, 1827, and is of Welsh descent, his forefathers being among the early settlers of Georgia and South Carolina. His ancestry, both paternal and maternal, was represented in the Revolutionary war. Richard Tiner, his great-grandfather, was a loyal soldier in the war for independence, and while he was absent in the army his family suffered an attack by Indians. His wife was shot through the right breast, their youngest child was ruthlessly beaten against a tree until its little life was ended, and a boy of five years and a girl of seven were carried away as captives. Another son, Isham Tiner, our subject’s grandfather, then a youth of sixteen, escaped the massacre, joined his father in the army and remained in the ranks until the close of the war. The wife and mother eventually recovered from her wound and some time afterward the captive children were returned to their parents. Isham Tiner, the grandfather, removed from Georgia to Illinois, becoming a frontier settler of the latter state. At the time of his removal to the prairie state his son Isham, father of our subject, was a small boy. When grown to manhood he married Miss Nancy Piett, who died at an early age and left three children, the youngest, Isham L., being an infant, and he alone survives. The eldest son, William, lost his life at the battle of Vicksburg, fighting in behalf of the Union. The father was a farmer by occupation and a man active in local affairs, for some...

Biography of Job Francis Dye

Among the figures who stand prominently forth on the pages of western history is the gentleman whose name introduces this review. His was a marvelous record of long connection with the events which go to make up the annals of the Pacific coast. He was one of those honored pioneers who blazed a path for future cavalcades to follow; who bravely turned their faces from the cities of the east, with all the advantages of wealth and civilization, and cast their fortunes with the western frontier, in all its wildness and primitive modes of life; who, rather than enjoy the comforts of their former homes, chose to endure the hardships of a wider and freer country; and who made out of those very obstacles, which, to a weaker class of men would have been stumbling blocks, the stepping stones to wealth and renown, none of these great men are more noted for untiring perseverance and steady progress which have resulted in the acquirement of wealth and the well merited esteem of their fellow men than the gentleman whose name heads this memoir. He realized with great prophetic foresight the magnitude of the prospects of the west, and that at a time when this section of the country gave but slight signs of her future greatness. If, as is maintained, the history of a country is best told in the lives of her prominent men, then certainly any history of Idaho or the Pacific coast would be incomplete without recognition of the salient points of the life record of this man, who was for many years a most influential and...
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