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Houses of the Blackfoot Confederacy

The tribes forming this group are the Siksika, or Blackfeet proper, the Piegan, and the Kainah, or Bloods. Closely allied and associated with these were the Atsina, a branch of the Arapaho, but who later became incorporated with the Assiniboin. These tribes roamed over a wide territory of mountains, plains, and valleys. Early accounts of the manners and ways of life of the Blackfeet are to be found in the journals kept by traders belonging to the Hudson’s Bay Company, who penetrated the vast, unknown wilderness southwestward from York Factory daring the eighteenth century. Although the records are all too brief and leave much to be desired, nevertheless they are of the greatest interest, referring as they do to the people while yet in a primitive state, with no knowledge of the customs of Europeans. The first of the journals to be mentioned is that of Anthony Hendry, who left York Factory June 26, 1754. He ascended Hayes River many miles, thence, after crossing numerous lakes and streams and traversing forests and plains, arrived on Monday, October 14, 1754, at a point not far northeastward from the present city of Calgary, Alberta. This was in the country of the Blackfeet, mentioned in the journal as the Archithinue Natives. That same day, so the narrative continues: “Came to 200 tents of Archithinue Natives, pitched in two rows, and an opening in the middle; where we were conducted to the Leader’s tent; which was, at one end, large enough to contain fifty persons; where he received us seated on a clear [white] Buffalo skin, attended by 20 elderly men. He made...

Kainah Tribe

Kainah First Nation, Kainah Indians, Blood Indians (Ah-kai-nah, ‘many chiefs,’ from a-kai-im many , ni´-nah chiefs ). A division of the Siksika, or Blackfeet, now living on a reservation under the Blood agency in Alberta, Canada, between Belly and St Mary Rivers. The subtribes or bands are Ahkaiksumiks, Ahkaipokaks, Ahkptashiks, Ahkwonistsists, Anepo, Apikaiyiks, Aputpsikainah, Inuhksoyistamiks, Isisokasimiks, Istsikainah, Mameoya, Nitikskiks, Saksinahmahyiks, Siksahpuniks, and Siksinokaks. According to the Report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs for 1858, there were then 300 tipis and 2,400 persons. In 1904 there were 1,196 persons on the reservation, of whom 958 were classed as pagans. Alternate Spellings: Bloodies. Hind, Red R. Exped., 157, 1860 (so called by half-breeds). Blood Indians. Writer of 1786 in Mass. Hist. Soc. Coll., 1st s., in, 24, 1794. Blood People. Morgan, Consang. and Affin., 289, 1871. Blut Indianer. Walch, map, 1805 (Ger man form). Ede-but-say. Anon. Crow MS. vocab., B. A. E. (Crow name). Gens du Sang. Duflot de Mofras, Expl., n, 342, 1844. Indiens du Sang. Ibid., 339. Kaenna. Maximilian, Travels, 245, 1843. Kahna. Ibid. Kai´-e-na. Hayden, Ethnog. and Philol. Mo. Val., 256, 1862. Kaimè. Browne in Beach, Ind. Miscel., 81, 1877. Kai´-na. Clark Wissler, inf’n, 1905 (Piegan dialectic form). Kai´nau. Tims, Blackfoot Gram. and Dict., 113, 1889 (Siksika name). Kainœ´-koon. Franklin, Journ. Polar Sea, I, 170, 1824 (own name). Kam´-ne. Hayden, op. cit., 402 (Crow name). Ke´na. Hale, Ethnol. and Philol. 219, 1846 (sing., Keneku’n). Ki-nä. Morgan, Consang. and Affin., 289, 1871 (trans.: high minded people ). Kine-ne-ai-koon. Henry, MS. vocab., 1808. Ki´-no. Morgan, Anc. Soc., 171, 1877. Meethco-thinyoowuc. Franklin, Journ. Polar  Sea , I, 170, 1824. We´-wi-ca-å....

Siksika Tribe

Siksika Indians. A tribe of the Siksika confederacy (see below). They now (1905) live on a reservation in Alberta, Canada, on upper Bow River, and are officially known as the Running Rabbit and Yellow Horse bands. They were divided into the following subtribes or bands: Aisikstukiks, Apikaiyiks, Emi-tahpahksaiyiks, Motahtosiks, Puhksinahmahyiks, Saiyiks, Siksinokaks,Tsiniktsistsoyiks. Pop. 942 in 1902, 795 in 1909. Siksika Confederacy Siksika Confederacy, (‘black feet’, from siksinam ‘black’, ka the root of ogkatsh ‘foot’. The origin of the name is disputed, but it is commonly believed to have reference to the discoloring of their moccasins by the ashes of the prairie fires; it may possibly have reference to black-painted moccasins, such as were worn by the Pawnee, Sihasapa, and other tribes). An important Algonquian confederacy of the northern plains, consisting of three subtribes, the Sikisa proper or Blackfeet, the Kainah or Bloods, and the Piegan, the whole body being popularly known as Blackfeet. In close alliance with these are the Atsina and the Sarsi. Within the recent historic period, until gathered upon reservations, the Blackfeet held most of the immense territory stretching almost from North Saskatchewan River, Canada, to the southern head-streams of the Missouri in Montana, and from about longitude 105° to the base of the Rocky Mountains. A century earlier, or about 1790, they were found by Mackenzie occupying the upper and middle South Saskatchewan, with the Atsina on the lower course of the same stream, both tribes being apparently in slow migration toward the N. W.1. This would make them the vanguard of the Algonquian movement from the Red River country. With the exception of a...

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