Discover your family's story.

Enter a grandparent's name to get started.

Start Now

A Southern Household during the Years 1860 to 1865

Ellen S. Elmore Columbia, S. C, December, 1901 I am told it is my duty to write what I can personally recall of the days of our hard struggle with fate, and because it is so considered, I shall make the effort to penetrate the dark chambers of my heart and brain for what I know lies there, hidden away from even my present consciousness. To bring it back, I must take myself to the beginning of events that bore immediately upon the grand tragedy of the century, to the summer of i860, the last time our whole family was gathered together under our mother’s roof. Our home was on the outskirts of Columbia, a very large, square house, great rooms, opening by French windows, on long double piazzas, extending along the whole front, and supported by columns from the ground to the roof. The steps were of rough granite, the first stone quarried in this county, and came from “Ticklebury Farm,” now the State Fair Grounds and Elmwood Cemetery, then owned by my grandfather Governor Taylor. Ours was one of the family places only once out of such possession, and bought back by my mother on her return to Columbia, after the death of my father Colonel Elmore in 1850. We made a large home circle my mother and six daughters: the eldest, Mrs. Thomas Taylor, being often with us, for her own home was quite near; the youngest, Rose, a schoolgirl, and two sons, Frank and Albert, living with us; the second, Albert, a student of the South Carolina College. Mrs. Taylor and two of the sisters...

Pin It on Pinterest