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Chowanoc Indians

Chowanoc Tribe: Meaning in Algonquian “(people) at the south.” Chowanoc Connections. The Chowanoc belonged to the Algonquian linguistic family and were evidently most nearly allied to the other North Carolina Algonquians. Chowanoc Location. On Chowan River about the junction of Meherrin and Blackwater Rivers. Chowanoc Villages Catoking, (probably) near Gatesville, in Gates County. Maraton, on the east bank of Chowan River in Chowan County. Metocaum, on Chowan River in the present Bertie County. Ohanoak, on the west side of Chowan River not far below Nottoway River probably in Hertford County. Ramushonok, apparently between the Meherrin and Nottoway Rivers in Hertford County. Chowanoc History. In 1584-85, when first known to Europeans, the Chowanoc were the leading tribe in northeastern North Carolina. In 1663 they entered into a treaty with the English by which they submitted to the English Crown, but they violated this in 1675 and after a year of warfare were compelled to confine themselves to a reservation on Bennett’s Creek which became reduced by 1707 from 12 square miles to 6. They sided with the colonists in the Tuscarora War, and at about the same time were visited by a Church of England missionary, Giles Rainsford. In 1723 a reservation of 53,000 acres was set aside for them conjointly with the Tuscarora and in 1733 they were given permission to incorporate with that tribe. They continued to decline in numbers until in 1755 Governor Dobbs stated that only 2 men and 3 women were left. Chowanoc Population. In 1584-85 one of the Chowanoc towns, Ohanoak was said to contain 700 warriors, and Mooney (1928) estimates their numbers at...

Chowanoc Tribe

Chowanoc Indians (Algonquian: shawŭni ‘south’; shawŭnogi‘they of the south,’ ‘southerners.’ W. J. ). A tribe formerly living on Chowan river, north east North Carolina, about the junction of Meherrin and Nottoway rivers. In 1584-85, when first known, they were the leading tribe in that region. Two of their villages at that time were Ohanoak and Maraton, and they probably occupied also Catoking and Metocaum. Ohanoak alone was said to have 700 warriors. They gradually dwindled away before the whites, and in 1701 were reduced to a single village on Bennetts Creek. They joined in the Tuscarora War against the whites in 1711-12, and at its close the remnant, estimated at about 240, were assigned a small reservation on Bennetts and Catherine creeks. In 1820 they were supposed to be extinct. In addition to the settlements named, the Chowanoc also occupied...

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