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Osage Indians

Osage Indians. A corruption of their own name Wazhazhe, which in turn is probably an extension of the name of one of the three bands of which the tribe is composed. Also called: Anahou, a name used by the French, perhaps the Caddo name. Bone Indians, given by Schoolcraft. The Osage were the most important tribe of the division of the Siouan linguistic stock called by J. O. Dorsey (1897) Dhegiha, which included also the Omaha, Ponka, Kansa, and Quapaw. Osage Locations The greater part of this tribe was anciently on Osage River, Mo., but from a very early period a smaller division known as Little Osage was on the Missouri River near the village of the Missouri Indians. (See also Arkansas, Kansas, and Oklahoma.) Osage Villages The two principal local divisions were the Great and Little Osages, mentioned above. About 1802 a third division, the “Arkansas Band,” was created by the migration of nearly half of the Big Osage to Arkansas River under a chief known as Big. Track. The names of the following Osage villages, some of them having the names of their chiefs, have been recorded: Big Chief, 4 miles from the Mission in Indian Territory in 1850. Black Dog, 60 miles from the Mission in Indian Territory in 1850. Heakdhetanwan, on Spring Creek, a branch of Neosho River, Indian Territory. Intapupshe, on upper Osage River about the mouth of Sac River, Missouri. Khdhasiukdhin, on Neosho River, Kansas. Little Osage Village, on Osage Reservation, Oklahoma, on the west bank of Neosho River. Manhukdhintanwan, on a branch of Neosho River, Kansas. Nanzewaspe, in Neosho valley, southeastern Kansas....

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