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Biographical Sketch of Edward B. Morelock

EDWARD B. MORELOCK. – Mr. Morelock was born in Missouri in 1845. While but a child of two years he suffered the loss of his father, who, as sheriff of Sullivan County, was killed by the owner of property that he was selling under execution. Upon the outbreak of the Rebellion, Edward, a youth of sixteen, joined the Missouri state militia, and in 1863 and enlisted in the Forty-second Missouri Volunteer Infantry, wherein he served until the end of the war. In 1865 he crossed the plains to Oregon, locating near Summerville in Union county, where he took a claim and farmed and raised stock until 1881. In that year he sold his realty and located in the town of Summerville, engaging in the agricultural implement business, in which he still continues. He has been city marshal ever since the incorporation of the place in 1885. He has also acted as deputy sheriff, and has served in similar capacities in connection with his regular business. During the Nez Perce trouble of 1877 he was a member of Captain William Booth’s company of Grande Ronde volunteers. He was also a lieutenant in Captain Morant’s company of volunteers during the Bannack war of 1878. He was married in Missouri in 1864 to Miss Rebecca, daughter of Joseph and Mary Ann Harris, of a noted family in that...

Biographical Sketch of Hon. John W. Norval

HON. JOHN W. NORVAL. – Mr. Norval, at present state senator from Union and Wallowa counties, was born in Knox County, Illinois, June 5, 1840, and is the son of James and Mahala Applewhite Norval. He resided upon a farm at his native place until the age of twenty, having while a mere boy suffered the loss of his father, and being a member of a family of four brothers and one sister. In April, 1860, he came west to Alexandria, Missouri, where he joined an emigrant train and came across the plains to California, arriving at Stockton November 6, 1860. He first found employment in teaching school until August, 1861, after which he came to the Northern mines in British Columbia, and for five years followed mining in Idaho, Washington and British Columbia, meeting with varying success. In the fall of 1866, he located a farm near Summerville, Oregon, and resided there for two years. In 1868 he located upon his present place, three and a half miles east of Summerville, where he has five hundred and sixty acres of choice land in Wallowa county. During the Bannack war he enlisted in a volunteer company, and was elected captain. In 1878 he was appointed, by Governor Thayer, major of the Third Brigade of the Oregon militia. Mr. Norval was candidate three times for the state legislature, but, from the fact that Union county was persistently Democratic, he was defeated until June, 1888, when he was elected to the state senate for Union and Wallowa counties, a position that he has ably filled. Mr. Norval was married in Union...

Biography of James H. Bush

James H. Bush, deceased, was one of the prominent and widely known businessmen of Boise, where he spent the greater part of his life. He was born in White Lake, Oakland County, Michigan, July 29, 1842, and was a son of Elias Oliver and Mary Jane (Fife) Bush, both of whom were well-to-do farmers and early settlers of Michigan and members of the Baptist church. James Bush was educated in Flint, Michigan, and in early manhood was a purser on a steamboat. In February, 1865, he sailed from New York for the Pacific coast by way of Panama, reaching Boise Basin in April, and there engaging in mining with William Law. In the summer of 1874 he came to Boise and purchased the Central Hotel, which he personally conducted for fifteen years in a most successful manner. He was one of the organizers of the Capital State Bank, was elected its first vice-president and filled that office up to the time of his death, devoting his time and talents during his incumbency to the task of making it the prosperous institution it became. As a businessman he was enterprising, capable and energetic, and in 1892 built one of the beautiful and commodious houses which adorn the city of Boise. As an early settler of the state he took a great interest in its development and progress and did everything in his power to advance its interests. During the Bannack war he was captain of a company, and on one occasion, with forty-five men, he gallantly rescued a train of sixty wagons which was besieged by the Indians near Cold...

Biography of Alexander D. McKinlay

The west is peopled with brave men, as men’s bravery is measured, but it has some notable citizens whose experiences extend back into the days of constant adventure and ever present peril. Could the exploits and dangers of such men of the west be written down and put into book form, they would form a series of narratives of more absorbing interest than the most exciting romances of western life and adventure that have ever been penned. A fair representation of this class is Alexander D. McKinlay. He is a son of Henry and Barbara Clarke McKinlay, natives of Scotland, and was born in Clayton County, Iowa, February 20, 1853. His father was born in Edinburg in 1823, and died in Clayton county, Iowa, in 1872. His mother, who was born in Sollen, in 1815, lives on the old family homestead in Iowa. They came to America and to Iowa in 1847 and became successful farmers, highly respected by reason of their high character and upright lives. Of their nine children, Alexander D. McKinlay was the fifth child in order of birth. He was reared to help at the work of the farm, and for a time attended school in a primitive log school house, and remained in Iowa until 1877, when, at the age of twenty-four, he emigrated to Idaho and located in Idaho county, where he lived until 1885. He farmed until 1882 with sufficient success to acquire some capital and commercial standing, and then bought thirteen hundred head of cattle and drove them over the old Mullan road to Montana, where he turned them over to...

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