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Menominee Indians

Menominee Indians were located on and near the Menominee River, Wisconsin, and in Michigan on or about the present location of Mackinac. The Menominee belonged to the Algonquian linguistic family and to the same section as the Cree and Foxes.

Siksika Indians

Siksika Indians. Located in the territory stretching from North Saskatchewan River, Canada, to the southern. headstreams of the Missouri in Montana, and from about longitude 105° W. to the base of the Rocky Mountains. The Siksika belong to the Algonquian linguistic stock, forming the most aberrant of all the well-recognized tongues of that family except Arapaho and Atsina.

Atsina Indians

Atsina Indians. Probably from Blackfoot At-se’-na, supposed to mean “gut people.” Also called: Acapatos, by Duflot de Mofras (1844). A-re-tear-o-pan-ga, Hidatsa name. Bahwetego-weninnewug, Chippewa name, signifying “fall people.” Bot-k’in’ago, signifying “belly men.” Fall Indians, common early name. Gros Ventres des Plaines, derived from an incorrect interpretation of the tribal sign and the qualifying phrase “des Plaines” to distinguish them from the Hidatsa, the Gros Ventres de la Riviere. Haaninin or Aa’ninena, own name, said to signify “white-clay people,” “lime-men,” or “chalk-men.” His-tu-i’-ta-ni-o, Cheyenne name. Hitfinena, Arapaho name, signifying “beggars” or “spongers.” Minnetarees of the Plains, Minnetarees of the Prairies, so called to avoid confusion with the Hidatsa (q. v. under North Dakota). Rapid Indians, from Harmon (1820). Sa’pani, Shoshoni name, signifying “bellies.” Sku’tani, Dakota name. Atsina Connections. The Atsina were a part of the Arapaho, of which tribe they are sometimes reckoned a division, and both belong to the Algonquian linguistic family. Atsina Location. On Milk River and adjacent parts of the Missouri, in what is now Montana, ranging northward to the Saskatchewan. (See also Canada.) Atsina Subdivisions Kroeber (1908 b) has recorded the following names of bands or clans, some of which may, however, be duplications: Names of clans whose position in the camp circle is known, beginning at the south side of the opening at the east: Frozen or Plumes, “Those-who-water-their-horses-once-a-day” Tendons, “Those-who-do-not-give-away,” or “Buffalo-humps” Opposite (or Middle) Assiniboin, “Ugly-ones or Tent-poles worn smooth [from travel]” Bloods, “Fighting-alone” Other clan names: Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. choose a state: Any AL AK AZ AR CA CO CT DE DC FL GA...

Chowanoc Indians

Chowanoc Tribe: Meaning in Algonquian “(people) at the south.” Chowanoc Connections. The Chowanoc belonged to the Algonquian linguistic family and were evidently most nearly allied to the other North Carolina Algonquians. Chowanoc Location. On Chowan River about the junction of Meherrin and Blackwater Rivers. Chowanoc Villages Catoking, (probably) near Gatesville, in Gates County. Maraton, on the east bank of Chowan River in Chowan County. Metocaum, on Chowan River in the present Bertie County. Ohanoak, on the west side of Chowan River not far below Nottoway River probably in Hertford County. Ramushonok, apparently between the Meherrin and Nottoway Rivers in Hertford County. Chowanoc History. In 1584-85, when first known to Europeans, the Chowanoc were the leading tribe in northeastern North Carolina. In 1663 they entered into a treaty with the English by which they submitted to the English Crown, but they violated this in 1675 and after a year of warfare were compelled to confine themselves to a reservation on Bennett’s Creek which became reduced by 1707 from 12 square miles to 6. They sided with the colonists in the Tuscarora War, and at about the same time were visited by a Church of England missionary, Giles Rainsford. In 1723 a reservation of 53,000 acres was set aside for them conjointly with the Tuscarora and in 1733 they were given permission to incorporate with that tribe. They continued to decline in numbers until in 1755 Governor Dobbs stated that only 2 men and 3 women were left. Chowanoc Population. In 1584-85 one of the Chowanoc towns, Ohanoak was said to contain 700 warriors, and Mooney (1928) estimates their numbers at...

Coree Indians

Coree tribe, or Coranine Tribe, Coranine Indians. Meaning unknown. Coree Connections. As the final stage of the Coree existence was passed with an Algonquian tribe, some have thought that the affiliations of  this people were also Algonquian. On the other hand Lawson (1860) that notes that their language and that of a tribe to the north were mutually intelligible and there is a reason for thinking that this northern tribe belonged to the Iroquois Confederacy. At least the Coree were closely associated in many ways with the Iroquoian Tuscarora. Coree Location. On the peninsula south of Neuse River in Carteret an Craven Counties. Coree Villages Coranine, probably on the coast in Carteret County. Narhantes, among the Tuscarora, 30 miles from Newbern. Raruta, probably on the coast of Carteret County, south of Neuse River. Coree History. When the Coree and the Whites first met is unknown, but they appear in the records of the Raleigh colony under the name Cwarennoc. They were greatly reduced before 1696 in a war with another people. They took part with the Tuscarora in their war against the colonists, and in 1715 the remnant of them and what was left of the Machapunga were assigned a reservation on Mattamuskeet Lake in Hyde County, where they occupied one village, probably until they became extinct. A few of them appear to have remained with the Tuscarora. Coree Population. The population of this tribe and the Neusiok was estimated by Mooney (1928) at 1,000 in 1600. In 1707 Lawson says they had 25 fighting men and were living in 2 villages. No later enumeration is known. Discover your...

Hatteras Indians

Hatteras Tribe: Meaning unknown. Linguistic Connections – The Hatteras belonged to the Algonquian linguistic family. Hatteras Location. Among the sandbanks about Cape Hatteras east of Pamlico Sound and frequenting Roanoke Island. Hatteras Village. Sandbanks, on Hatteras Island. Hatteras History. Lawson (1860) thought the Hatteras showed traces of White blood and therefore they may have been the Croatan Indians with whom Raleigh’s colonists are supposed to have taken refuge. They disappeared soon after as a distinct tribe and united with the mainland Algonquians. In 1761, the Rev. Alex. Stewart baptized 7 Indians and mixed-blood children of the” Attamuskeet, Hatteras, and Roanoke” tribes and 2 years later he baptized 21 more. Hatteras Population. The Hatteras population has been estimated with the Machapunga and other tribes at 1,200 in 1600; they had 16 warriors in 1701, or a total population of about 80. Connection in which they have become noted. The possible connection of the Hatteras with the Croatan has been mentioned and their name has become perpetuated in the dangerous cape at the angle of the outer sand islands of their old country. Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. choose a state: Any AL AK AZ AR CA CO CT DE DC FL GA HI ID IL IN IA KS KY LA ME MD MA MI MN MS MO MT NE NV NH NJ NM NY NC ND OH OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT VA WA WV WI WY INTL Start...

Machapunga Indians

Machapunga Tribe: Said to mean “bad dust,” or “much dirt,” in the native Algonquian language. Machapunga Connections. The Machapunga belonged to the Algonquian linguistic stock. Machapunga Location. In the present Hyde County and probably also in Washington, Tyrrell and Dare Counties, and part of Beaufort. Machapunga Villages. The only village named is Mattamuskeet (probably on Mattamuskeet Lake in Hyde County). However, we should probably add Secotan on the north bank of Pamlico River in Beaufort County, and perhaps the town of the Bear River Indians. Machapunga History. The Machapunga seem to have embraced the larger part of the descendants of the Secotan, who lived between Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds when the Raleigh colony was established on Roanoke Island (1585-86) though the Pamlico may also have been included under the same head. They were reduced to a single village by 1701, took part with other Indian tribes of the region in the Tuscarora War, and at its close were settled on Mattamuskeet Lake with the Coree. In 1761 a small number were still living in North Carolina, evidently at the same place, and the Rev. Alex. Stewart reported that he had baptized seven Indian and mixed-blood children belonging to the “Attamuskeet, Hatteras, and Roanoke.” On a second visit 2 years later he baptized 21 more. Machapunga Population. The Machapunga are estimated by Mooney (1928) to have numbered 1,200, including some smaller tribes, in 1600. In 1701 Lawson gives 30 warriors, probably less than 100 souls (Lawson, 1860). In 1775 there were said to be 8 to 10 on the mainland and as many more on the off-shore banks. In 1761...

Moratoc Indians

Moratok Tribe, Moratok Indians (Moratoc Tribe). A place name, but the meaning otherwise unknown. Moratoc Connections. There is little doubt that the Moratok belonged to the Algonquian linguistic stock and were closely related to the other Algonquian tribes of the sound region of North Carolina. Moratoc Location. On Roanoke River and apparently on the north side, and estimated to be 160 miles up the river, though the distance is evidently reckoned from the Raleigh settlement on Roanoke Island Moratoc Villages. The village bearing the name of the tribe is the only one known. Moratoc History. The sole mention of the Moratok is in the narratives of the Raleigh expeditions. They were first recognized as an independent tribe by Mr. Maurice Mook (1943 a). Moratoc Population. Unknown but reported as large. Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. choose a state: Any AL AK AZ AR CA CO CT DE DC FL GA HI ID IL IN IA KS KY LA ME MD MA MI MN MS MO MT NE NV NH NJ NM NY NC ND OH OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT VA WA WV WI WY INTL Start...

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