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Descendants of Alexander Bisset Munro of Bristol, Maine

Alexander Bisset Munro was born 25 Dec. 1793 at Inverness, Scotland to Donald and Janet (Bisset) Munro. Alexander left Scotland at the age of 14, and lived in Dimecrana in the West Indies for 18 years. He owned a plantation, raising cotton, coffee and other produce. He brought produce to Boston Massachusetts on the ship of Solomon Dockendorff. To be sure he got his money, Solomon asked his to come home with him, where he met Solomon’s sister, Jane Dockendorff. Alexander went back to the West Indies, sold out, and moved to Round Pond, Maine, and married Jane. They had 14 children: Janet, Alexander, Margaret, Nancy, Jane, Mary, Solomon, Donald, John, William, Bettie, Edmund, Joseph and Lydia.

The Settlers of Narraguagus Valley Maine

A glance at the map of the western part of Washington County will show that any treatment of the early settlement upon the Narraguagus River, necessarily involves more or less of the histories of Steuben, Milbridge, Harrington and Cherryfield. Steuben was formerly township “No. 4, East of Union River,” and No. 5 comprised the territory now included in the towns of Milbridge and Harrington. The town of Cherryfield is composed of No. 11, Middle Division, Brigham Purchase, and of the northeastern part of what was formerly Steuben. All that part of Cherryfield lying south of the mills on the first or lower dam was, prior to 1826, a part of Steuben, and was called Narraguagus to distinguish it from the settlement in the southwestern part, which was called “Head of the Bay,” and the post office at Cherryfield was called “Narraguagus” until within some twenty-five years past. What is now the flourishing town of Milbridge was a part of Harrington until 1848. Harrington (No. 5) was incorporated as a town in 1791, Steuben (No. 4) in 1795, Cherryfield (No. 11) in 181G, and the northeast part of Steuben was annexed to Cherryfield in 1826. I find that prior to the incorporation of Harrington, that township and No. 11, Cherryfield, held their plantation meetings and kept their records as one organization. At that time most of the settlers in Harrington lived at Mill River, where the earliest settlement was made. There was no settlement at what is now Harrington village until several years later. I have found it impossible to ascertain the date of the very earliest settlement upon the...

Campbell Genealogy of Narraguagus Valley Maine

Some time between 1766 and 1768, Alexander Campbell removed from Damariscotta to Steuben, and built a mill at Tunk, now called Smithville, on the east side of the river. It was the first mill there. In 1759, he married Betsey Nickels, who was born in Ireland and came to Lynn, Mass., with her parents when about six years old. From Lynn, she came with her brother, Capt. William. Nickels, to Damariscotta. Children of Alexander and Betsey Campbell were: James, Frances, Hannah, Peggy, Polly, William, Samuel, Alexander, and Betsey.

Leighton Genealogy of Narraguagus Valley Maine

About 1760, two brothers, Thomas and Samuel Leighton, came from Falmouth to this River. Samuel settled on the lot now in possession of Richard P. Willey. His sons were Theodore Leighton, Isaac Leighton, Parritt Leighton and Phineas Leighton. Thomas Leighton, the brother of Samuel Leighton, settled upon a lot at the head of Pigeon Hill Bay. He had a family of six sons and five daughters. Robert, Joseph, Thomas, Annie, Molly, James, Ross, Abigail, Betsey, Sarah and Benjamin. Nearly at the same time that Thomas and Samuel Leighton came and settled, Thomas Leighton 2d came from Dover, N. H., to Gouldsboro. His wife was Lydia Tracy. It is not known that there was any relationship between these two Thomas Leightons. From Gouldsboro, Thomas 2d soon removed to Steuben and settled upon the lot afterwards known as the Henry Leighton lot. He had ten children, Jonathan, Mark, Charity, Alexander, Hatevil, Pamelia, Isaiah, Daniel, Israel and Asa.

Muster Roll of Captain James Clark’s Company

Muster Roll of Captain James Clark’s Company of Light Infantry in the Detachment of drafted Militia of Maine, called into actual service “by the State, for the protection of its Northeastern Frontier, from the twentieth day of February, 1839, the time of its rendezvous at Bangor, Maine, to the eleventh day of May, 1839, when discharged or mustered.

Muster Roll of Captain Henry Bailey’s Company

Muster Roll of Captain Henry Bailey’s Company of Infantry in the Detachment of drafted Militia of Maine, called into actual service by the State, for the protection of its Northeastern Frontier from the fifth day of March, 1839, the time of its rendezvous at Calais Maine, to the sixth day of April, 1839, when discharged or mustered. Captain Henry Bailey. Lieutenant John A. Brown. Ensign William Worster. Sergeants Pickering Patten. Zenas Wheeler. Curtis Merritt. John Church. Corporals Moses Worster, Jr. Joshua W. Norton. Nathan G. Peasley. Amos Whitten. Musicians. Archibald Smith. James P. Lawrence. Privates Allen, Joseph S. Bagley, James. Beal, William D. Caler, John B. Caligan, Humphrey. Chandler, Barnabas S. Church, George W. Connery, John. Cotton, William. Crowley, Nathaniel. Cummings, Amos. Cummings, Samuel B. Cummings, William B. Dorr, John F. Dorr, Joseph P. Dorr, Leonard W. Dorr, Moses W. Dorr, Richard B. Farr, James. Farnsworth, George. Foster, William. Grant, Ephram. Grant, James D. Holmes, William. Jacques, William. Knowlton, Joel. Leighton, James. Low, Lehi. McCarthy, Charles. McCaslin, Amaziah N. McCaslin, Stephen J. McKinsey, Joseph D. McLure, James. Newingham, Nicholas. O’Brien, Matthew. Peabody, Joshua. Pickett, James. Plummer, Fellars. Reynolds, James. Richardson, Enoch. Sinclair, William. Skinner, Justin. Small, Elbridge G. W. Smith, Moses. Smith, Russell. Steward, Temple C. Tabberts, Jeremiah. Tabberts, John 2d. Tabberts, Otis. Tabberts, Samuel H. Tinney, Otis. Tucker, John. Turner, Patrick. Whitney, Asa B. Willey, Amos P. Woodward, Thomas. Worster, Isaac Jr. Worster, John Jr. Worster, Mark. Wright,...

Norwich Vermont in the Civil War

During the four years of war for the suppression of the Rebellion, Norwich furnished 178 different men for the armies of the Union. There were seven re-enlistments, making the whole number of soldiers credited to the town 185. By the census of 1860, the number of inhabitants was 1759. It appears, therefore, that the town sent to the seat of war rather more than one in ten of its entire population, during the four years’ continuance of hostilities. About the same proportion holds good for the state at large, Vermont contributing, out of an aggregate population of 315,116, soldiers to the number of 34,555 for the defense of the Union. Of the 178 men enlisting from Norwich, twenty-seven laid down their young lives in the service of the country. The soil of every southern state, from the Potomac to the Rio Grande, was moistened by the blood or supplied a grave to one or more of these. The town paid the larger part of these men liberal bounties, amounting to about $32,000, in addition to their state and government pay. All calls for men upon the town by the national authorities were promptly and fully met. The patriotic response of our people to the expenses and sacrifices of the war was, in general, hearty and emphatic; and yet candor and the truth of history compels us to confess that there were here, as in most other towns throughout the north, a few disloyal spirits who sympathized with the Slaveholders’ rebellion, who denounced the war from beginning to end, and who scarcely concealed their satisfaction when news came of rebel...

Biographical Sketch of Comstock Willey

Comstock Willey, farmer, was born in Asthabula County, Ohio., in 1821; removed to Harrison County, Ia., in 1867, and located on present farm, in Boyer township; owns 170 acres of good farming land, well improved, with bearing vineyard of two hundred vines, and good young orchard. He has been justice of the peace five years; is a member of the A.F. & A.M. order. He was married in Ashtabula County, Ohio., to Rosanna Bell, and has four...

Biographical Sketch of Jabez Willey

Jabez Willey, son of Eben Willey, born in Peacham, Vt., July 22, 1801, came to this town in July, 1840, and still resides here, aged eighty-two years. He was the first Universalist preacher in the town, and has often traveled six or eight miles on the Sabbath to preach in some school-house of this or adjoining towns, and even now, at his advanced age, the Universalist society has no more earnest and able advocate than Jabez...

Stout, Ann Marie Willey, Mrs. – Obituary

Ann Marie Stout, 64, of Baker City, died May 18, 2009, at her home after a brief battle with cancer with her loving husband, Del, by her side. Her graveside service will be at 2 p.m. Thursday at Mount Hope Cemetery. Dale Bingham will officiate. Friends are invited to join the family for a reception at the Eagles Lodge, 2935 H St., after the service. Ann was born Oct. 27, 1944, at Whittier, Calif., to Tom and Danette Willey. She married Del Stout on September 12, 1964, in Covina, Calif. They had three children: Doug, Rick and Debbie; and in 1973 the couple decided they wanted to raise their children in a smaller, close-knit community. With little money in their pockets, they came to Baker City and bought a small farm just outside of town. Ann was a dedicated homemaker and took pride in raising her three children. She did whatever she could to make them happy and enjoyed seeing them smile. Once her daughter, Debbie, was finished with elementary school in 1982 Ann decided it was time to join the workforce and began an 11-year career as a secretary for Pioneer Bank in Baker City. She enjoyed working with the public and made some lifelong friends there. Ann was a very friendly person and one who always supported her husband and children on all their endeavors. After leaving the bank in 1993, Ann and Del owned and operated Stout Distributing Candy Business, Wilson’s Warehouse Market and most recently, Elkhorn Lanes and Little Susie’s Meat Market. She enjoyed being around others and meeting new people. As a member of...

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