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History of Cayuga County New York

This history of Cayuga County New York published in 1879, provides a look at the first 80 years of existence for this county, with numerous chapters devoted to it’s early history. One value of this manuscript may be found in the etched engravings found throughout of idyllic scenes of Cayuga County including portraits of men, houses, buildings, farms, and scenery. Included are 90 biographies of early settlers, and histories of the individual townships along with lists of men involved in the Union Army during the Civil War on a regiment by regiment basis.

Seneca County New York Biographies

In the 1980’s a series of newsletters were published four times a year by Seneca County NY featuring historical information concerning Seneca county and her past residents. The current historian for Seneca County placed these online using PDF files. One of the main features of each edition were biographical sketches of early settlers of Seneca County. Unfortunately, while they provided an index inside of a spreadsheet for the 189 biographies, it is difficult for the average user to quickly get around. I’ve taken their spreadsheet and linked each edition to the PDF file. Once you’ve found the biography you want, click on the newsletter edition and then browse the pages until you find the specific biography you were looking for. This should help you find these wonderful biographies a little easier. SurnameGivenNewsletter Edition AckleyBenjaminSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 1, No. 4 AckleyJacobSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 1, No. 4 AckleySamuelSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 1, No. 4 AckleySamuel J.Seneca County History newsletter Vol. 3 No. 3 AlexanderWilliam H.Seneca County History newsletter Vol. 4 No. 2 AllenSilasSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 1, No. 2 AlmySamuelSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 4 No. 1 ArmstrongJohnSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 3 No. 1 BachmanJosephSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 2, No. 1 BaileyEbenezerSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 2, No. 4 BaileyGeorge & SamuelSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 1, No. 2 BainbridgeJohnSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 1, No. 2 BainbridgeMahlonSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 1, No. 2 BainbridgePeterSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 1, No. 2 BainbridgeSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 1, No. 2 BaldwinJonas C.Seneca County History newsletter Vol. 2, No. 2 BangsAbnerSeneca County History...

Choctaw Law Forbidding White-Indian Marriage

Of the Choctaws regulating the marriage of white men to the Choctaw women: Whereas, the Choctaw Nation is being filled up with white persons of worthless characters by so-called marriages to the great injury of the Choctaw people. Section 1st. Be it enacted by the General Council of the Choctaw Nation assembled: That the peace and prosperity of the Choctaw people require that any white man or citizen of the United States, or of any foreign government, desiring to marry a Choctaw woman, citizen of the Choctaw Nation, shall be and is hereby required to obtain a license for the same, from any of the Circuit Clerks or Judges of a Court of Record, and make oath, or satisfactory showing to such Clerk or Judge, that he has not a surviving wife from whom he has not been lawfully divorced, and unless such information be freely furnished to the satisfaction of the Clerk or Judge no license shall issue. Section 2nd. Be it further enacted: That every white man or person applying for a license as provided in preceding section of this act, shall before obtaining the same, be required to present to the said Clerk or Judge a certificate of good moral character, signed by at least ten respectable Choctaw citizens by blood, who shall have been acquainted with him at least twelve months immediately preceding the signing of such certificate. 3rd. Be it further enacted, before any license as herein provided shall be issued; the person applying shall be, and is hereby required to pay to the Clerk or Judge, the sum of twenty-file dollars, and be also...

Bethany Baptist Church Cemetery Graham Indiana

This is an historical transcription of Bethany Baptist Church Cemetery, Graham, Jefferson County, Indiana which was transcribed in 1941 as part of the DAR cemetery transcription project. The value of this transcription is that in many cases they transcribed headstones which may today no longer exist. Had it not been for this project these records may have been lost due to the natural regression of cemeteries. Many of the cemeteries may be known by a different name today, we use the name they were identified as in 1941. Arbuckle, J. N., 07 Aug 1837 – 10 Dec 1882 Boyd, Robert H., 09 May 1830 – 22 June 1917, Co. B. 10th Iowa Regiment Cain, John, 23 Aug 1868 – 15 Apr 1892 Cain, Melissa J., w/o John Cain, 12 Mar 1813 – 07 Aug 1867 Cain, Martha, w/o John Cain, 20 Jun 1838 – 17 Jan 1893 Cain, Emma, 1867 – 1927 Cain, Marcellus, 22 Sep 1842 – 25 Mar 1878 Chambers, Rose N., d/o of Chas & Nancy Chambers, 25 Sep 1864 – 08 Jun 1886 Chambers, Nancy, 25 Jun 1819 – 24 Jan 1891 Chambers, James B., 07 May 1822 – 24 Dec 1893 Chambers, Melita, w/o Alex Chambers, d. 04 Feb 1878, age 47 years Chambers, Avery, consort of Rhoda Chambers, d. 08 Mar 1865, age 67 years Chambers, Rhoda, w/o Avery Chambers, d. 21 Aug 1875, age 75 years Chasteen, inf. Son of Chasteen, 1863 Chasteen, James, 07 Aug 1818 – 07 Jun 1889 Chasteen, Elizabeth, 1820 – 1902 Chasteen, Ephraim, 25 Nov 1847 – 01 Sep 1927 Chasteen, Christenia, w/o E. Chasteen, 28 Mar...

Sons of Quebec 1778-1843

The Sons of Quebec (Fils de Québec) were written by Pierre-Georges Roy and published in 1933 in a four volume set. They provide a series of short biographies of one to three pages of Quebec men from 1778-1843. Warning… this manuscript is in French!

Cleveland County Oklahoma Cemeteries

Most of these Cleveland County Oklahoma cemeteries are complete indices at the time of transcription, however, in some cases we provide the listing when it is only a partial listing. Hosted at Cleveland County OKGenWeb Archives Blackburn Cemetery Box Cemetery Corbett Cemetery Corbett Cemetery Tombstone Photos Denton Cemetery Denver Cemetery Falls Cemetery Knoles Cemetery Tombstone of Martin V B Knoles Maguire-Fairview Cemetery Schwartz Cemetery Sunset Memorial Park Cemetery U.G./Kear Memorial Cemetery Warren Cemetery Cemetery Hosted at Oklahoma Genealogical Society Indian Graves Hosted at GenRoots Emmanual Memorial Cemetery – South OKC IOOF Cemetery – Noble IOOF Cemetery – Norman Moore Cemetery Resthaven Memory Gardens – OKC St. Joseph Catholic Cemetery – Norman Sunset Memorial Park – Norman Hosted at Oklahoma Cemeteries Absentee Shawnee Tribal Cemetery Adkins Family Cemetery Banner Cemetery Bethel Cemetery Blackburn Cemetery Blanchard Family Cemetery Box Cemetery Chappel Hill Cemetery, aka Cropper Cemetery, aka Rose Hill Denver Cemetery Dripping Springs Cemetery Emanuel Cemetery Fairview Cemetery Falls Cemetery Ford Cemetery, aka Pleasant Grove Friendship Cemetery Guillen Cemetery Heritage Burial Park Hillside Cemetery Holsonbake Cemetery, aka Denton, Elsiemont Independence Cemetery Knoles Cemetery, aka Pleasant Ridge Cemetery Lexington Cemetery Lilac Hill Cemetery Little Axe Family Cemetery Little Axe Tribal Cemetery Little Charley Family Cemetery Maguire – Fairview Cemetery Moore City Cemetery Mt. Zion Cemetery Noble I O O F Cemetery Norman I O O F Cemetery Pilgrims Rest Cemetery Red Oak Cemetery Resthaven Cemetery Rock Creek Cemetery Rose Hill Cemetery Sanford Cemetery Schwartz Cemetery Shiloh Cemetery Smith Cemetery St. John’s Cemetery St. Joseph Catholic Cemetery Stella Cemetery Sunset Memorial Park Cemetery Tiger Family Cemetery U. G. Kear Memorial Cemetery Warren Cemetery, aka...

The Bush Family of Norwich Vermont

Captain Timothy Bush, the progenitor of this family in town, came to Norwich in the early days of its settlement (from what place is not known). He married Deborah House, and they had ten children (five of whom were born in Norwich), viz., John Bush, married Abigail Marvin and had at least one son: George Bush. Barzilla Bush. Timothy Bush. Fairbanks Bush. Alexander Bush. Bela Bush. Harry Bush. Nathaniel Bush. Mary Bush, who married Nathaniel Seaver. Lavina Bush, who married Doctor Hamilton of Lyme, New Hampshire. Captain Bush appears as a voter in town in 1772, and March 9, 1799, he was chosen one of the board of five selectmen. He was prominent in town affairs till about the time he removed to the State of New York (about 1809), where, it is reported, he died in 1815. It is current with some persons that he ended his days here in Norwich and that he was buried in the old graveyard near the mouth of Pompanoosuc River, but no gravestone can be found to indicate his burial there. When Captain Bush located in Norwich it was in the Pompanoosuc section of the town, where he became an extensive landowner. He was one of the original proprietors of the town of Orange, Vermont, chartered by the state in August, 1781. His son, John, with Paul Brigham, Nathaniel Seaver, John Hibbard, Elihu White, and John White, were other Norwich men who were proprietors of that town, and his sons, Fairbanks and Timothy, Jr., were among the early settlers of the place, the former being elected selectman and also lister on the first organization of the town, March 9,...

Migration of Families out of Norwich VT

At the first enumeration of the inhabitants of eastern Vermont, as made by the authority of New York in 1771, Norwich was found to be the most populous of all the towns of Windsor County, having forty families and 206 inhabitants. Windsor followed with 203, and Hartford was third with 190. The aggregate population of the county (ten towns reported) was then but 1,205, mostly confined to the first and second tiers of towns west of the Connecticut River. Twenty years later, in 1791, Hartland led all the towns of the county with 1,652 inhabitants, Woodstock and Windsor coming next with 1,605 and 1,542 respectively. Exceptional causes made the little town of Guilford (now numbering scarcely more than one thousand inhabitants), till after the year 1800, the most populous town in the state. In Norwich, the great falling off in the size of families in recent years is seen in the fact, that in the year 1800, the number of children of school age was 604, out of a total population of 1,486, while in 1880 with a nearly equal population (1,471) it was but 390. In the removal of large numbers of the native-born inhabitants by emigration, we must find the principal cause of the decline of our rural population. Preeminently is this true of Norwich. The outflow of people began very early and now for more than a century there has been one unbroken, living stream of emigration pouring over our borders. Several families that had first located here became, before the close of the Revolutionary War, the pioneer settlers of Royalton, Tunbridge, and Randolph. Some of...

Norwich Vermont in the Revolutionary War

The sources of information in regard to the part taken by the town in the Revolutionary struggle are few and scanty. The earliest allusion in the town records to this important epoch of the country’s history is found in the election of a Committee of Safety at the annual town meeting, March 11, 1777. This committee was five in number: Deacon Joseph Smalley, Samuel Hutchinson, John Hatch, Captain Hezekiah Johnson and John Hopson. There is much reason to believe, however, that this was not the first Committee of Safety that acted for the town; but was a new committee selected to conform to a recommendation made to the towns in Cumberland and Gloucester Counties by the Convention at Westminster which declared the independence of Vermont the preceding January.1 It is pretty certain that a company of militia was organized in Norwich as early as the year 1774 or 1775. Of this company Peter Olcott was chosen Captain and Thomas Murdock, Ensign, doubtless by the votes of the men enrolled in the same. The company was probably a purely voluntary organization of patriotic young men, in Colonel Seth Warner‘s regiment of Rangers in 1775, in the continental service. Colonel Timothy Bedell, of Haverhill, N. H., also raised a regiment the same year for service in Canada. Fresh regiments were enlisted early in the spring of 1776, by both Colonel Bedell and Colonel Warner. Again on the 7th of March Colonel Morey writes to the New Hampshire Committee of Safety: “Some recruiting officers from Colonel Warner‘s party [regiment] have enlisted a considerable number of fine men, they had the money to...

The Spaniards in Alabama and Mississippi

England, having lost her West Florida provinces by the victories of Galvez, and having the American Whigs, as well as the natives of France, Spain and Holland, arrayed against her, was finally forced to retire from the unequal contest. A preliminary treaty of peace was signed at Paris. England there acknowledged our independence, and admitted our southern boundary to be as follows: A line beginning at the Mississippi, at 31° north of the equator, and extending due east to the Chattahoochie River; down that river to the mouth of the Flint, and thence to the St. Mary’s, and along that river to the sea. Great Britain also expressly stipulated, in that treaty, our right to the navigation of the Mississippi River, from its mouth to its source. Jan. 20 1783: Great Britain and Spain entered into a treaty. The former warranted and confirmed to the latter the province of West Florida, and ceded to her East Florida.1 But although England, by the treaty of 1782, assigned to the United States all the territory between the Mississippi and the Chattahoochie, lying between the parallels of latitude 31° and 32° 28′, embracing the same portion of the territory of Alabama and Mississippi, which lay in the British province of West Florida, yet it was not surrendered to us by Spain for years afterwards. Spain occupied it, contending that Great Britain, in the treaty with her, in 1783, warranted the province of West Florida to her, not defining its northern limits, and that England had no right to restrict her limits, even if she had attempted it, for Spain had, before the...
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