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Richard Dexter Genealogy, 1642-1904

Being a history of the descendants of Richard Dexter of Malden, Massachusetts, from the notes of John Haven Dexter and original researches. Richard Dexter, who was admitted an inhabitant of Boston (New England), Feb. 28, 1642, came from within ten miles of the town of Slane, Co. Meath, Ireland, and belonged to a branch of that family of Dexter who were descendants of Richard de Excester, the Lord Justice of Ireland. He, with his wife Bridget, and three or more children, fled to England from the great Irish Massacre of the Protestants which commenced Oct. 27, 1641. When Richard Dexter and family left England and by what vessel, we are unable to state, but he could not have remained there long, as we know he was living at Boston prior to Feb. 28, 1642.

A History of Peaks Island Maine and its People

A history of Peaks Island and its people: also a short history of House Island, Portland, Maine. In presenting this history of two of the best known islands in Portland Harbor, it has been the intention of the author to give only the story of the early days of those islands, and of the families who have contributed to their history.

Champ, Edyth Marie Wallis – Obituary

Mrs. Ralph J. Champ, 59, succumbed Sunday [October 2, 1955] at her home on route 1, Winlock. Mrs. Champ, born Sept. 22, 1896 in Arlington, Wash., is survived, in addition to her husband, by a daughter, Mrs. Lynne Pope, Algona; sister, Mrs. R. D. Campbell, Winlock; three brothers, Robert Wallace [Wallis], Spokane, and William and Hugh Wallace, Arlington, and three grandchildren. The deceased was a member of the Presbyterian Church. Funeral services will be held Wednesday at 11 a.m., at the John W. Boone Chapel in Chehalis with the Rev. George Shuman officiating. Cremation will follow. [Interment in Winlock Cemetery] Contributed by: Shelli...

Wallis, Georgia E. Linn – Obituary

Though it had been know for several years the Mrs. J. C. Wallace was in failing health, the announcement of her death Friday morning came as a surprise and shock to the community. she had just lived on uncomplaining to a place where her resistance failed and she was carried to the other world. Georgia E. Linn, daughter of Sylvester J. and Katie Linn, was born 6 March 1870, at Aurora, Illinois, and came with her parents to Harrison County Iowa, at the age of three months. They established the Linn homestead on the east bank of Linn Lake, only a short distance from her future home, where she passed away 3 July 1936 at the age of 66 years, 4 months and 26 days. Her girlhood was typical of the times. She learned early the valuable lessons of good conduct, honesty, industry and thrift. Her early education was obtained in the rural schools of her township, which with the able guidance of her father, himself a teacher, was both broad and thorough. This was supplemented later by a course in the Woodbine Normal. Thus equipped, she taught for several years in the schools of Harrison County. On 7 February 1894 she was married to James C. Wallis and the young couple established their home only a short distance from her childhood home. To this happy union were born five children, all of whom were present at the funeral. They were Mrs., Hazel Donn, of Mondamin; Vincent, of Walthill, Nebraska; Mrs. Harriet Burford, of Augusta, Kansas; Kenneth, of Baltimore, Maryland; and Miss Florence of Mondamin. The wholesome lessons of...

Biographical Sketch of H. M. Wallis Jr.

H. M. Wallis, Jr., manager of the Wallis Tractor Company, which was organized in 1912, was born in Racine on the 24th of January, 1888, a son of H. M. and Jessie (Case) Wallis. He pursued his education as a student in Racine College, the Manor School at Stamford, Connecticut and in the Hotchkiss School of Salisbury, Connecticut, and when his school days were over he returned to Racine, whore he secured employment in the J. I. Case Plow Works. He advanced through all departments in the shop, gaining comprehensive knowledge of the business, and afterward traveled for the corporation out of the Dallas (Texas) office, representing the company in all for about five years. On the expiration of that period he was made manager of the Wallis Tractor Company, which was organized in 1912 for the manufacture of farm and road tractors. This business has rapidly developed and the value of its output has become widely known, so that the sale now extends widely over American territory. In 1912 Mr. Wallis was married to Miss Gertrude Allien, of Stamford, Connecticut. He is identified with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and he has membership in the Country Club. He also belongs to the Commercial Club and in politics is a republican. He has neither time nor inclination to seek public office, however, as the development of his business claims his entire attention. He is a young man of keen discrimination and sound judgment and his executive ability and excellent management have brought to the concern with which he is connected a large degree of...

Biography of H. M. Wallis

The rapid and steady growth of the business of the J. I. Case Plow Works and the enviable standing of the Company’s products are due in large measure to the personal force, the executive ability and the high business standards of H. M. Wallis, who for twenty-four years has been president of the corporation. He was born in White Pigeon, Michigan, on the 24th of June, 1861, a son of T. O. and Eliza A. (Mitchell) Wallis, born respectively in Culpeper Courthouse, Virginia, and in Kenosha, then Southport, Wisconsin. The father engaged in the real estate business in Detroit, Michigan, for many years and met with gratifying success in that connection. When a child, H. M. Wallis lost his father and at six years old, accompanied his mother to Racine, Wisconsin. After completing the course offered in the public schools he entered McMynn Academy, from which he was graduated. When sixteen years of age he went to work in the office of the Mitchell-Lewis Wagon Company and six years later was made receiver of the Fish Brothers Wagon Company. He gave evidence of so much administrative ability and possessed such a thorough grasp of the implement business that he was made general manager of the J. Case Plow Works, becoming at that time a member of the company. In 1892 he was elected president of the concern and has since filled that responsible position. He keeps in close touch with the various departments, requires the greatest possible efficiency and insists that the Case watch words, quality and service, be lived up to in all the work done. Moreover, he...

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