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History of Kossuth, Hancock, and Winnebago Counties, Iowa

History of Kossuth, Hancock, and Winnebago Counties, Iowa together with sketches of their cities, villages and townships, educational, civil, military and political history; portraits of prominent persons, and 641 biographies of representative citizens. Also included is a history of Iowa embracing accounts of the pre-historic races, and a brief review of its civil and military history.

Genealogies of the First Settlers of Passaic Valley

Passaic Valley in New Jersey was first settled in the early 1700’s, primarily by families from Long Island, New York and Connecticut. The Family records, or, Genealogies of the first settlers of Passaic Valley and vicinity above Chatham provides genealogies of these early settlers from family records when they could be obtained, otherwise the author used family members to provide the information. Since some of the information comes from memory of individuals, one should validate what is written before relying on it to greatly.

1923 Historical and Pictorial Directory of Angola Indiana

Luedders’ historical and pictorial city directory of Angola, Indiana for the year 1923, containing an historical compilation of items of local interest, a complete canvass of names in the city, which includes every member of the family, college students, families on rural lines, directory of officers of county, city, lodges, churches, societies, a directory of streets, and a classified business directory.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Seneca and Schuyler Counties, NY

In this volume will be found a record of many whose lives are worthy the imitation of coming generations. It tells how some, commencing life in poverty, by industry and economy have accumulated wealth. It tells how others, with limited advantages for securing an education, have become learned men and women, with an influence extending throughout the length and breadth of the land. It tells of men who have risen from the lower walks of life to eminence as statesmen, and whose names have become famous. It tells of those in every walk in life who have striven to succeed, and records how that success has usually crowned their efforts. It tells also of many, very many, who, not seeking the applause of the world, have pursued “the even tenor of their way,” content to have it said of them, as Christ said of the woman performing a deed of mercy – “They have done what they could.” It tells how that many in the pride and strength of young manhood left the plow and the anvil, the lawyer’s office and the counting-room, left every trade and profession, and at their country’s call went forth valiantly “to do or die,” and how through their efforts the Union was restored and peace once more reigned in the land. In the life of every man and of every woman is a lesson that should not be lost upon those who follow after. Genealogists will appreciate this volume from the fact that it contains so much that would never find its way into public records, and which would otherwise be inaccessible. Great...

Washington County, Idaho Pioneer Honor Roll

In 1940 and 1943, a survey of everyone who had lived in Washington County continuously for 50 years or more, was made by the Weiser American. These pioneer residents were especially honored at the Fall Festival held in the fall of both years. So far as is known, the list compiled by the survey is complete and perhaps the only record of its kind in existence. The community loyalty and neighborly spirit that typifies this locality is our legacy from these early pioneers. Their sweat and toil made possible many luxuries that we of Washington County now enjoy. Their ambition and foresight resulted in far flung civic improvements that are of lasting benefit. SurnameGiven NameMiddle Name/TitleAddressCame FromDate Arrived AdamEffieMrs.WeiserIowaJuly, 1879 AdamsFrancisCambridgeCornwall, Eng.1874 AdamsRichardJWeiserCornwall, Eng.1874 AdamsVereWeiserNative1890 AdamsonRosaMidvaleKansas1884 AderBerthaMrs.MidvaleAugust, 1881 AderArthurWeiserMissouri1884 AllenClaudeMrs.Weiser1889 AllisonAlexBCambridgeNative1875 AndersonErnmaO. / Mrs.WeiserSweden1887 ApplegateWilliamWeiserOregon1878 BartonBarbaraS. / Mrs.WeiserMissouri1882 BartonCarrieMrs.Weiser1882 BartonMollieWeiserNative1885 BeierAmeliaMrs.WeiserUtah1882 BlackDoraMrs.WeiserMontana1888 BoydLillianHague / Mrs.MidvaleNative1881 BradshawWalterWeiserIllinois1884 BranchBS. / Mrs.MidvaleNative BrooksArthurSWeiserNative1873 BuhlThomasCambridge1869 CalwhiteMaeSalingWeiserNative1883 CalwhiteMartinWeiserGermanySept. 1887 CanaryLizzieMrs.WeiserMontana1881 CarpbbellLenaWeiserNative1882 CarrickBertCambridgeKansas1882 ConnellMaryMrs.WeiserIndiana1880 CopeBenWeiserNative1882 CorbettJRWeiserNative1883 CornettOllieJones / Mrs.MidvaleNative1879 CornettIsaacWMidvaleOregon1882 CousensWJWeiserSept. 1882 CowinsLewisWeiserCalifornia1887 CoxAliceMrs.Cambridge1881 CrowellLoraCravenWeiserNative1880 DalyCarrieM. / MrsWeiserOregonApril 1884 DaytonMaryWeiserJerusalem, Idaho1878 DevennyGeoMrs.WeiserNative1884 DickersonL.M. / MrsWeiserBoise1869 DickersonLMWeiserKansas1877 DodgeMaybelleBrooksWeiserNative1868 DonartGeorgeWeiserNative1890 EcclesWilliamHCambridge1886 EdlinLauraWilsonWeiserIllinois1886 ElliottAndrewWeiserOregon1887 EshomEmmaF. / Mrs.WeiserKansas1875 EvansDudleyMidvaleAugust, 1881 EvansJohnMidvaleNative1882 FavreLouisMidvaleOregon1889 GallowayFrancisHWeiserNative1871 GallowayAFWeiserNative1877 GallowayGuyWeiserNative1880 GallowayKatherineWeiserNative1882 GilderoyGeorgeWeiserIllinoisJuly, 1871 GilderoyNA. / AllieWeiserNative1875 GilderoyMaryMrs.WeiserOregon1878 GlascockGeorgeWeiserNative1882 GrayClaraE. / Mrs.WeiserOregonSpring, 1872 GrayThomasWWeiserNativeJuly, 1882 GrimmettWilliamWeiserOregon1883 HagueGeorgeWeiserNative1888 HarrisFrankJudgeWeiserCalifornia1880 HarrisNettieO. / Mrs.WeiserOklahoma1881 HauntzHJWeiserMissouriJuly, 1882 HemenwayJB. / Sr.WeiserUtah1880 HemenwayJB. / Sr.WeiserNative1881 HixonCL. / Dr.WeiserKansas1882 HoffstatterMaryCambridgeNebraska1879 HopkinsLeeAWeiserOhio1889 HopkinsVernonJWeiser1889 HopperRA. / Mrs.WeiserMissouri1876 HopperJohnMMidvaleAugust, 1883 HubbardJW. / Mrs.WeiserSept. 1882 HubbardCoraAWeiserIllinois1882 HubbardJWWeiserOregon1886 JacksonAlexWeiserMissouri1890 JonesMaryMrs.Native1872 JonesIda.WeiserKansas1875 JonesAJWeiserMissouri1878 KeithleySAMidvale1876 KeithleySA. / Mrs.MidvaleMissouri1881 KeithleySarahMrs.MidvaleMissouri1881 KeithleySeppie.MidvaleMissouri1881 KeithlyEffieMrs.Midvale1881 KimballSallieR. / Mrs.WeiserNative1877 KiserCharlesAWeiserColorado1881 KorupFranz.WeiserGermany1888 LaffertyZellaMrs.WeiserNative1884 LanningRebecca.WeiserKansas1891 LedingtonCalvin.MidvaleKansas1883 LedingtonCal.MidvaleKansas1883 LinderMinnieMrsMidvaleUtah1870 LinderThosMMidvaleColoradoSept. 1875 LinderRoseMidvale1877 LinderRoseGrosecloseMidvale1877 MadisonDave.Weiser1880 MartinDoraKelly / Mrs.WeiserNative1876...

Slave Narrative of Katie Sutton

Interviewer: Lauana Creel Person Interviewed: Katie Sutton Location: Evansville, Indiana Folklore District #5 Vanderburgh County Lauana Creel “A TRADITION FROM PRE-CIVIL WAR DAYS” KATIE SUTTON, AGED EX-SLAVE Oak street, Evansville, Ind. “White folks ‘jes naturally different from darkies,” said Aunt Katie Sutton, ex-slave, as she tightened her bonnet strings under her wrinkled chin. “We’s different in color, in talk and in ligion and beliefs. We’s different in every way and can never be spected to think oe [TR: or?] to live alike.” “When I was a little gal I lived with my mother in an old log cabin. My mammy was good to me but she had to spend so much of her time at humoring the white babies and taking care of them that she hardly ever got to even sing her own babies to sleep.” “Ole Missus and Young Missus told the little slave children that the stork brought the white babies to their mothers but that the slave children were all hatched out from buzzards eggs and we believed it was true.” “Yes, Maam, I believes in evil spirits and that there are many folks that can put spells on you, and if’n you dont believe it you had better be careful for there are folks right here in this town that have the power to bewitch you and then you will never be happy again.” Aunt Katie declared that the seventh son of a seventh son, or the seventh daughter of a seventh daughter possesses the power to heal diseases and that a child born after the death of its father possesses a strange and...

Slave Narrative of Jane Sutton

Person Interviewed: Jane Sutton Location: Gulfport, Mississippi Place of Birth: Simpson County MS Age: 84 Jane Sutton, ex-slave, is 84 years old. She is 5 feet, 6 inches tall and weighs 130 pounds. She is what the Negroes themselves call a “brown-skin.” “I was born in Simpson County, near old Westville, on a big farm what b’long to Marse Jack Berry. I was 12 years old when de surrender come, so my ole Mis’ say. Her name was ‘Mis Ailsey an’ all us cullud folks call her ‘Ole Mi’s. She an’ Old Marster had twelve chillun: Marthy, ‘Lizabeth, Flavilia, Mary, Jack, Bill, Denson, Pink, Tally, Thomas, Albert, and Frank. “My pappy’s name was Steve Hutchins. He b’long to de Hutchins what live down near Silver Creek. He jus’ come on Satu’d’y night an’ us don’ see much of ‘im. Us call him ‘dat man.’ Mammy tol’ us to be more ‘spectful to ‘im ’cause he was us daddy, but us aint care nothin’ ’bout ‘im. He aint never brung us no candy or nothin’. “My mammy was name Lucy Berry. She always go by de white folks name what she live wid. She aint never marry. She had fo’ boys an’ three girls. Dey was name Delia, Sarah, Ella, Nathan, Isom, Anderson, an’ Pleas. She work in de fiel’ an Old Marster say she’s de only woman on de place what could plow lak a man. “I ‘members my gran’ma, too. Us always call her ‘Granny.’ She say dey stole her back in Virginny an’ brung ‘er to Mississippi an’ sol’ her to Marse Berry. Her name was Hannah....

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