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Indians in Mason County Michigan 1880 Census

These 355 people were identified as Indians (I) in column 4 (color) of the 1880 census for Mason County Michigan. In order to have been enumerated they are believed to either have renounced tribal rule, and under state law, exercised their rights as citizens; or because they “mingled” with the white population of these Michigan towns were enumerated under the expanded definitions.

Slave Narrative of Jack Simms

G. Monroe Dist. 4 Jefferson County Interviewer: G. Monroe Person Interviewed: Jack Simms Location: Madison, Indiana Place of Birth: Kentucky SLAVE STORY MR. JACK SIMMS’ STORY Personal Interview Mr. Simms was born and raised on Mill Creek Kentucky, and now lives in Madison Indiana on Poplar Street diagonally North West of the hospital. He was so young he did no remember very much about how the slaves were treated, but seemed to regret very much that he had been denied the privilege of an education. Mr. Simms remembers seeing the lines of soldiers on the Campbellsburg road, but referred to the war as the “Revolution War”. This was a very interesting old man, when we first called, his daughter invited us into the house, but her father wanted to talk outside where he “spit better”. When his daughter conveyed this information Mr. Simms’ immediately decided that we could come in as we “wouldn’t be there long anyhow”. After we gained entrance, the daughter remarked that her father was very young at the time of the war, whereupon he answered very testily “If you are going to tell it, go ahead. Or am I going to tell...

Slave Narrative of John Rudd

Interviewer: Lauana Creel Person Interviewed: John Rudd Location: Evansville, Indiana Place of Birth: Springfield, Kentucky Date of Birth: December 25, 1854 Age: 83 Ex-Slave Stories District #5 Vanderburgh County Lauana Creel TOLD BY JOHN RUDD, AN EX-SLAVE “Yes, I was a slave,” said John Rudd, “And I’ll say this to the whole world, Slavery was the worst curse ever visited on the people of the United States.” John Rudd is a negro, dark and swarthy as to complexion but his nose is straight and aqualine, for his mother-was half Indian. The memory of his mother, Liza Rudd, is sacred to John Rudd today and her many disadvantages are still a source of grief to the old man of 83 years. John Rudd was born on Christmas day 1854 in the home of Benjamin Simms, at Springfield, Kentucky. The mother of the young child was house maid for mistress Simms and Uncle John remembers that mother and child received only the kindliest consideration from all members of the Simms family. While John was yet a small boy Benjamin Simms died and the Simms slaves were auctioned to the highest bidders. “If’n you wants to know what unhappiness means,” said Uncle John Rudd, “Jess’n you stand on the Slave Block and hear the Auctioneer’s voice selling you away from the folks you love.” Uncle John explained how mothers and fathers were often separated from their dearly loved children, at the auction block, but John and his younger brother Thomas were fortunate and were bought by the same master along with Liza Rudd, their mother. An elder brother, Henry, was separated from...

Slave Narrative of Dennis Simms

Interviewer: Stansbury Person Interviewed: Dennis Simms Date of Interview: September 19, 1937 Location: Baltimore, Maryland Place of Birth: Contee, Prince Georges County, Maryland Date of Birth: June 17, 1841 Place of Residence: 629 Mosher St., Baltimore, Maryland Reference: Personal interview with Dennis Simms, ex-slave, September 19, 1937, at his home, 629 Mosher St., Baltimore. Born on a tobacco plantation at Contee, Prince Georges County, Maryland, June 17, 1841, Dennis Simms, Negro ex-slave, 628 Mosher Street, Baltimore, Maryland, is still working and expects to live to be a hundred years old. He has one brother living, George Simms, of South River, Maryland, who was born July 18, 1849. Both of them were born on the Contee tobacco plantation, owned by Richard and Charles Contee, whose forbears were early settlers in the State. Simms always carries a rabbit’s foot, to which he attributes his good health and long life. He has been married four times since he gained his freedom. His fourth wife, Eliza Simms, 67 years old, is now in the Providence Hospital, suffering from a broken hip she received in a fall. The aged Negro recalls many interesting and exciting incidents of slavery days. More than a hundred slaves worked on the plantation, some continuing to work for the Contee brothers when they were set free. It was a pretty hard and cruel life for the darkeys, declares the Negro. Describing the general conditions of Maryland slaves, he said: “We would work from sunrise to sunset every day except Sundays and on New Year’s Day. Christmas made little difference at Contee, except that we were given extra rations of...

Slave Narrative of Andrew Simms

Person Interviewed: Andrew Simms Location: Sapulpa, Oklahoma Age: 80 My parents come over on a slave ship from Africa about twenty year before I was born on the William Driver plantation down in Florida. My folks didn’t know each other in Africa but my old Mammy told me she was captured by Negro slave hunters over there and brought to some coast town where the white buyers took her and carried her to America. She was kinder a young gal then and was sold to some white folks when the boat landed here. Dunno who they was. The same thing happen to my pappy. Must have been about the same time from the way they tells it. Maybe they was on the boat, I dunno. They was traded around and then mammy was sold to William Driver. The plantation was down in Florida. Another white folks had a plentation close by. Mister Simms was the owner. Bill Simms, that’s the name pappy kept after the war. Somehow or other mammy and pappy meets ’round the place and the first thing happens they is in love. That’s what mammy say. And the next thing happen is me. They didn’t get married. The Master’s say it is alright for them to have a baby. They never gets married, even after the war. Just jumped the broomstick and goes to living with somebody else I reckon. Then when I was four year old along come the war and Master Driver takes up his slaves and leaves the Florida country and goes way out to Texas. Mammy goes along, I goes along, all...

Slave Narrative of Andrew Simms

Person Interviewed: Andrew Simms Location: Sapulpa, Oklahoma Age: 80 My parents come over on a slave ship from Africa about twenty year before I was born on the William Driver plantation down in Florida. My folks didn’t know each other in Africa but my old Mammy told me she was captured by Negro slave hunters over there and brought to some coast town where the white buyers took her and carried her to America. She was kinder a young gal then and was sold to some white folks when the boat landed here. Dunno who they was. The same thing happen to my pappy. Must have been about the same time from the way they tells it. Maybe they was on the same boat, I dunno. They was traded around and then mammy was sold to William Driver. The plantation was down in Florida. Another white folks had a plantation close by. Mister Simms was the owner. Bill Simms – that’s the name pappy kept after the War. Somehow or other mammy and pappy meets ’round the place and the first thing happens they is in love. That’s what mammy say. And the next thing happen is me. They didn’t get married. The Master’s say it is alright for them to have a baby. They never gets married, even after the War. Just jumped the broomstick and goes to living with somebody else I reckon. Then when I was four year old along come the War and Master Driver takes up his slaves and leaves the Florida country and goes way out to Texas. Mammy goes along, I goes...

Biographical Sketch of James A. Simms

James A. Simms, deceased, was born in the state of Georgia. When he arrived at his majority he married Miss Emily Jane Hansom, a daughter of a prominent slave holder and planter in the same neighborhood in which he was raised. He moved into Hopkins County in the year 1853, where he settled and raised a large and interesting family. Jonathan Simms, was his eldest child. The others were Uca C., Tom K., Amanda, J. M. Simms, Jr., Britton B., Bianca, and Kendrick,D. three of these children are living in the county. Uca C. is now Mrs. Shugart, a prosperous farmer and a worthy citizen, of noble qualities. J. M., Jr. is a doctor of high standing, and is appreciated for his skill as a physician and as a citizen of noble and generous impulses. He married Miss Annie L. Lacy, a Hopkins County lady of excellent family and good blood. Brooks Simms married Miss Robertson, daughter of Thomas Robertson, a Baptist preacher. The name of the Simms family is prominent in the county. Some of the best citizens in the county are among them. They are all sober, high-minded gentlemen, and well worthy of the good name they...

Biography of T. L. Simms

Jesse M. Simms, deceased, was born in the state of Georgia in the year 1813. At the age of twenty-two years he married Miss E. G. White in an adjacent county. In the year 1857 he moved with his family to Hopkins County, Texas. They were the parents of three children-two girls and one boy. The eldest, Miss Martha, married John P. Orr, a distant relative, and raised a large and respectable family in Hopkins County. The youngest, Miss Penelope, married Rev. James Christian, a Baptist preacher and a splendid gentleman. T. L. Simms married Miss Minter at the age of twenty-four years; She was a daughter of Uncle Joe Minter, an old Texan whom all loved for his many noble qualities of heart and soul. By this marriage twelve children were born, nine of whom are living. Mr. Simms’ family are all about grown. There are two living at home with their parents. They are all worthy of mention in this history-sober, industrious honest, just and truthful. He has used great care and caution in training and educating his children, and with the help of a noble wife and mother to assist, advise, counsel and admonish, he has been successful in rearing first-class children. He has followed farming and raising a few cattle, all through life. He is in comfortable circumstances; always ready and willing to meet all legal and lawful demands. His house is well furnished and his table well supplied, and his friends are at all times welcome and encouraged. He has been a Democrat in politics, and has been honored by his party to fill...

Biography of Franklin Barry Simms

Franklin Barry Simms. During a residence of thirty years or more in Topeka, a thoroughly public spirited citizenship had been one of the chief characteristics of Franklin Barry Simms. He had also administered his private affairs with success, had built up and made a name and repntation for one of the largest laundries and eleaning houses in the city, and had devoted himself with utmost unselfishness to the welfare of the community. He started life as a printer and it was in that capacity that he was first known in Kansas. He was born at Alton, Madison County, Illinois, April 9, 1851, being one of the eleven children of Doctor David and Sarah (Manley) Simms. His parents were both of the same age and were both natives of Derbyshire, England. They were married in England in 1844, and on the same day set out for America, coming with a party of relatives. David Simms was a physician and also an excellent business man. On coming to America they located at what was then called Frenchtown close to the City of St. Louis. Later he established himself in the City of Alton, and enjoyed a large practice as a physician there for many years. He also built up an extensive wholesale drug house. For a number of years this house furnished the oil for the Chicago and Alton Railroad. One day when leaving his store for home he loaded a gun for protection on the way, and it was accidentally discharged and caused a permanent injury to one of his hands. On this account he never became a soldier, though...

Simms, Harry Lester – Obituary

Harry Lester Simms, resident of Wallowa county for 48 years, died at Enterprise March 17, aged 50 years. He crossed the plains at the age of two years with his parents, who settled on a homestead on Hurricane creek. Deceased is survived by his wife, one brother and three sisters, one of the latter being Mrs. Meade Ballard of Union. The Weekly Eastern Oregon Republican, March 25, 1932 Contributed by: Holly...
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